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Undirected Networks


Agent-Centered Search

AI Magazine

In this article, I describe agent-centered search (also called real-time search or local search) and illustrate this planning paradigm with examples. Agent-centered search methods interleave planning and plan execution and restrict planning to the part of the domain around the current state of the agent, for example, the current location of a mobile robot or the current board position of a game. These methods can execute actions in the presence of time constraints and often have a small sum of planning and execution cost, both because they trade off planning and execution cost and because they allow agents to gather information early in nondeterministic domains, which reduces the amount of planning they have to perform for unencountered situations. These advantages become important as more intelligent systems are interfaced with the world and have to operate autonomously in complex environments. Agent-centered search methods have been applied to a variety of domains, including traditional search, strips-type planning, moving-target search, planning with totally and partially observable Markov decision process models, reinforcement learning, constraint satisfaction, and robot navigation.


#111 Machine Learning with TensorFlow with Chris Mattmann – Author / Manager, Chief Technology and Innovation Officer -- DATA FUTUROLOGY PODCAST

#artificialintelligence

Chris Mattmann is the Deputy Chief Technology and Innovation Officer at NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, where he has been recognised as JPL's first Principal Scientist in the area of Data Science. Chris has applied TensorFlow to challenges he's faced at NASA, including building an implementation of Google's Show & Tell algorithm for image captioning using TensorFlow. He was involved in the Mars rover landing mission, where he was working in a planetary data system engineering node, helping to build a data management framework called object-oriented data technology to support capturing, processing and sharing of data for NASA's scientific archives. He contributes to open source as a former Director at the Apache Software Foundation, and teaches graduate courses at USC in Content Detection and Analysis, and in Search Engines and Information Retrieval. In this episode, Chris opens the show discussing his interest in data.


Improving Convolutional Neural Networks for Text Coherence Modelling using Class Balancing…

#artificialintelligence

Lately, Deep Learning is gaining huge popularity due to its supremacy in terms of accuracy when it comes to very complex problems. It proved efficiency in NLP and was widely adopted by many problems to address them opening new doors for more meaningful and accurate modeling approaches. While many problems in NLP involve text syntheses such as text generation and multi-document summarization, text quality measures became a core requirement, and modeling them is an active problem. Of these measures, the problem of text coherence is key and needs special handling. Text coherence, which means the degree of the logical consistency of text, is a problem that dates back to the 1980s, where several models were suggested.


Variational Bayes In Private Settings (VIPS)

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Many applications of Bayesian data analysis involve sensitive information such as personal documents or medical records, motivating methods which ensure that privacy is protected. We introduce a general privacy-preserving framework for Variational Bayes (VB), a widely used optimization-based Bayesian inference method. Our framework respects differential privacy, the gold-standard privacy criterion, and encompasses a large class of probabilistic models, called the Conjugate Exponential (CE) family. We observe that we can straightforwardly privatise VB's approximate posterior distributions for models in the CE family, by perturbing the expected sufficient statistics of the complete-data likelihood. For a broadly-used class of non-CE models, those with binomial likelihoods, we show how to bring such models into the CE family, such that inferences in the modified model resemble the private variational Bayes algorithm as closely as possible, using the Pólya-Gamma data augmentation scheme. The iterative nature of variational Bayes presents a further challenge since iterations increase the amount of noise needed. We overcome this by combining: (1) an improved composition method for differential privacy, called the moments accountant, which provides a tight bound on the privacy cost of multiple VB iterations and thus significantly decreases the amount of additive noise; and (2) the privacy amplification effect of subsampling mini-batches from large-scale data in stochastic learning. We empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in CE and non-CE models including latent Dirichlet allocation, Bayesian logistic regression, and sigmoid belief networks, evaluated on real-world datasets.


Bridging the Gap Between Probabilistic Model Checking and Probabilistic Planning: Survey, Compilations, and Empirical Comparison

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research

Markov decision processes are of major interest in the planning community as well as in the model checking community. But in spite of the similarity in the considered formal models, the development of new techniques and methods happened largely independently in both communities. This work is intended as a beginning to unite the two research branches. We consider goal-reachability analysis as a common basis between both communities. The core of this paper is the translation from Jani, an overarching input language for quantitative model checkers, into the probabilistic planning domain definition language (PPDDL), and vice versa from PPDDL into Jani. These translations allow the creation of an overarching benchmark collection, including existing case studies from the model checking community, as well as benchmarks from the international probabilistic planning competitions (IPPC). We use this benchmark set as a basis for an extensive empirical comparison of various approaches from the model checking community, variants of value iteration, and MDP heuristic search algorithms developed by the AI planning community. On a per benchmark domain basis, techniques from one community can achieve state-ofthe-art performance in benchmarks of the other community. Across all benchmark domains of one community, the performance comparison is however in favor of the solvers and algorithms of that particular community. Reasons are the design of the benchmarks, as well as tool-related limitations. Our translation methods and benchmark collection foster crossfertilization between both communities, pointing out specific opportunities for widening the scope of solvers to different kinds of models, as well as for exchanging and adopting algorithms across communities.


Learning DAGs with continuous optimization

AIHub

As datasets continually increase in size and complexity, our ability to uncover meaningful insights from unstructured and unlabeled data is crucial. At the same time, a premium has been placed on delivering simple, human-interpretable, and trustworthy inferential models of data. One promising class of such models are graphical models, which have been used to extract relational information from massive datasets arising from a wide variety of domains including biology, medicine, business, and finance, just to name a few. Graphical models are families of multivariate distributions with compact representations expressed as graphs. In both undirected (Markov networks) and directed (Bayesian networks) graphical models, the graph structure guides the factorization of the joint distribution into smaller local specifications such as clique potentials or local conditionals of a variable given its "parent" variables.



Inference in the Stochastic Block Model with a Markovian assignment of the communities

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Large random graphs have been very popular in the last decade since they are powerful tools to model complex phenomena like interactions on social networks or the spread of a disease. In practical cases, detecting communities of well connected nodes in a graph is a major issue, motivating the study of the Stochastic Block Model (SBM). In this model, each node belongs to a particular community and edges are sampled independently according to a probability depending of the communities of the nodes. Aiming at progressively bridging the gap between models and reality, time evolving random graphs have been recently introduced. In [20], a Stochastic Block Temporal Model is considered where the temporal evolution is modeled through a discrete hidden Markov chain on the nodes membership and where the connection probabilities also evolve through time.


Deep Reinforcement Learning (DRL): Another Perspective for Unsupervised Wireless Localization

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Location is key to spatialize internet-of-things (IoT) data. However, it is challenging to use low-cost IoT devices for robust unsupervised localization (i.e., localization without training data that have known location labels). Thus, this paper proposes a deep reinforcement learning (DRL) based unsupervised wireless-localization method. The main contributions are as follows. (1) This paper proposes an approach to model a continuous wireless-localization process as a Markov decision process (MDP) and process it within a DRL framework. (2) To alleviate the challenge of obtaining rewards when using unlabeled data (e.g., daily-life crowdsourced data), this paper presents a reward-setting mechanism, which extracts robust landmark data from unlabeled wireless received signal strengths (RSS). (3) To ease requirements for model re-training when using DRL for localization, this paper uses RSS measurements together with agent location to construct DRL inputs. The proposed method was tested by using field testing data from multiple Bluetooth 5 smart ear tags in a pasture. Meanwhile, the experimental verification process reflected the advantages and challenges for using DRL in wireless localization.


Detecting Dynamic Community Structure in Functional Brain Networks Across Individuals: A Multilayer Apporach

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We present a unified statistical framework for characterizing community structure of brain functional networks that captures variation across individuals and evolution over time. Existing methods for community detection focus only on single-subject analysis of dynamic networks; while recent extensions to multiple-subjects analysis are limited to static networks. To overcome these limitations, we propose a multi-subject, Markov-switching stochastic block model (MSS-SBM) to identify state-related changes in brain community organization over a group of individuals. We first formulate a multilayer extension of SBM to describe the time-dependent, multi-subject brain networks. We develop a novel procedure for fitting the multilayer SBM that builds on multislice modularity maximization which can uncover a common community partition of all layers (subjects) simultaneously. By augmenting with a dynamic Markov switching process, our proposed method is able to capture a set of distinct, recurring temporal states with respect to inter-community interactions over subjects and the change points between them. Simulation shows accurate community recovery and tracking of dynamic community regimes over multilayer networks by the MSS-SBM. Application to task fMRI reveals meaningful non-assortative brain community motifs, e.g., core-periphery structure at the group level, that are associated with language comprehension and motor functions suggesting their putative role in complex information integration. Our approach detected dynamic reconfiguration of modular connectivity elicited by varying task demands and identified unique profiles of intra and inter-community connectivity across different task conditions. The proposed multilayer network representation provides a principled way of detecting synchronous, dynamic modularity in brain networks across subjects.