Decision Tree Learning


Machine Learning in GIS: Understand the Theory and Practice

#artificialintelligence

This course is designed to equip you with the theoretical and practical knowledge of Machine Learning as applied for geospatial analysis, namely Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing. By the end of the course, you will feel confident and completely understand the Machine Learning applications in GIS technology and how to use Machine Learning algorithms for various geospatial tasks, such as land use and land cover mapping (classifications) and object-based image analysis (segmentation). This course will also prepare you for using GIS with open source and free software tools. In the course, you will be able to apply such Machine Learning algorithms as Random Forest, Support Vector Machines and Decision Trees (and others) for classification of satellite imagery. On top of that, you will practice GIS by completing an entire GIS project by exploring the power of Machine Learning, cloud computing and Big Data analysis using Google Erath Engine for any geographic area in the world.


SAS and R Integration for Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

R first appeared in 1993 and has gained a steady and fiercely loyal fan base. But as data sets become both longer and wider, storage and processing speeds become an issue. Having spent weeks whipping an extremely wide and messy data set into shape using only R, I am so grateful for SAS Viya and not having to go through that again. SAS Viya is a cloud-enabled, in-memory analytics engine which allows for rapid analytics insights. SAS Viya utilizes the SAS Cloud Analytics Services (CAS) to perform various actions and tasks.


Machine Learning Advanced: Decision Trees in Python

#artificialintelligence

Free Course - Machine Learning Advanced: Decision Trees in Python [2020] Use Decision Trees to solve business problems and build high accuracy prediction models in Python, Learn how to use decision trees to make predictions for business problems using python. Start with this advanced machine learning tutorial today! Instructor: Start Tes Enroll Now - Machine Learning Advanced: Decision Trees in Python About this Course The course is created on the basis of three pillars of learning: Know (Study) Do (Practice) Review (Self feedback) Know We have created a set of concise and comprehensive videos to teach you all the Excel related skills you will need in your professional career. Add To Cart - GET COUPON CODE Do With each lecture, we have provide a practice sheet to complement the learning in the lecture video. These sheets are carefully designed to further clarify the concepts and help you with implementing the concepts on practical problems faced on-the-job.


Interpretability: Cracking open the black box – Part II

#artificialintelligence

In the last post in the series, we defined what interpretability is and looked at a few interpretable models and the quirks and'gotchas' in it. Now let's dig deeper into the post-hoc interpretation techniques which is useful when you model itself is not transparent. This resonates with most real world use cases, because whether we like it or not, we get better performance with a black box model. For this exercise, I have chosen the Adult dataset a.k.a Census Income dataset. Census Income is a pretty popular dataset which has demographic information like age, occupation, along with a column which tells us if the income of the particular person 50k or not. We are using this column to run a binary classification using Random Forest.


Build a Decision Tree in Minutes using Weka (No Coding Required!)

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning can be intimidating for folks coming from a non-technical background. All machine learning jobs seem to require a healthy understanding of Python (or R). So how do non-programmers gain coding experience? Here's the good news – there are plenty of tools out there that let us perform machine learning tasks without having to code. You can easily build algorithms like decision trees from scratch in a beautiful graphical interface.


Build a Decision Tree in Minutes using Weka (No Coding Required!)

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning can be intimidating for folks coming from a non-technical background. All machine learning jobs seem to require a healthy understanding of Python (or R). So how do non-programmers gain coding experience? Here's the good news – there are plenty of tools out there that let us perform machine learning tasks without having to code. You can easily build algorithms like decision trees from scratch in a beautiful graphical interface.


[-1,1]: Random Forests and Decision Trees * BioinformationX

#artificialintelligence

Here we will build a Python(-ic/-esque) Random Forest. Since with python everything is made so easy that you can easily build very complex machines out from one or two libraries, it is better to delve into basic topics before dipping our nose into untameable beasts. Let us start from a single "decision tree" (a simple problem). After that we will extend our knowledge and learn to build a Random Forest and an application to a real problem. To warm up, we will start with a toy problem, with only two features and two classes.


Understanding Voting Outcomes through Data Science

#artificialintelligence

After the surprising results of the 2016 presidential election, I wanted to better understand the socio-economic and cultural factors that played a role in voting behavior. With the election results in the books, I thought it would be fun to reverse-engineer a predictive model of voting behavior based on some of the widely available county-level data sets. For example, if you want to answer the question "how could the election have been different if the percentage of people with at least a bachelor's degree had been 2% higher nationwide?" you can simply toggle that parameter up to 1.02 and click "Submit" to find out. The predictions are driven by a random forest classification model that has been tuned and trained on 71 distinct county-level attributes. Using real data, the model has a predictive accuracy of 94.6% and an ROC AUC score of 96%.


Provably robust boosted decision stumps and trees against adversarial attacks

Neural Information Processing Systems

The problem of adversarial robustness has been studied extensively for neural networks. However, for boosted decision trees and decision stumps there are almost no results, even though they are widely used in practice (e.g. We show in this paper that for boosted decision stumps the \textit{exact} min-max robust loss and test error for an $l_\infty$-attack can be computed in $O(T\log T)$ time per input, where $T$ is the number of decision stumps and the optimal update step of the ensemble can be done in $O(n 2\,T\log T)$, where $n$ is the number of data points. Moreover, the robust test error rates we achieve are competitive to the ones of provably robust convolutional networks. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Robustness Verification of Tree-based Models

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study the robustness verification problem of tree based models, including random forest (RF) and gradient boosted decision tree (GBDT). Formal robustness verification of decision tree ensembles involves finding the exact minimal adversarial perturbation or a guaranteed lower bound of it. Existing approaches cast this verification problem into a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) problem, which finds the minimal adversarial distortion in exponential time so is impractical for large ensembles. Although this verification problem is NP-complete in general, we give a more precise complexity characterization. We show that there is a simple linear time algorithm for verifying a single tree, and for tree ensembles the verification problem can be cast as a max-clique problem on a multi-partite boxicity graph.