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Tony Hudgell raises £1m walking 10km on prosthetic legs

BBC News

A five-year-old boy who had both of his legs amputated has raised more than £1m for the hospital that saved his life.


Researchers Augment Robotic Prosthetics With AI and Computer Vision – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

The AI in robotic prostheses predicts the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantifies the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporates that uncertainty into its decision-making. Researchers at North Carolina State University have integrated computer vision and artificial intelligence into off-the-shelf robotic prosthetics to improve walking on different types of terrain. The team built a device that attaches to the prosthetic limb to track movement and recognize different terrains. The AI is able to recognize six different terrains: downstairs, upstairs, cement, grass, tile, and concrete. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," said Edgar Lobaton, associate professor of computer engineering at North Carolina State University.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

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But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


Researchers incorporate computer vision and uncertainty into AI for robotic prosthetics

#artificialintelligence

Researchers have developed new software that can be integrated with existing hardware to enable people using robotic prosthetics or exoskeletons to walk in a safer, more natural manner on different types of terrain. The new framework incorporates computer vision into prosthetic leg control, and includes robust artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms that allow the software to better account for uncertainty. "Lower-limb robotic prosthetics need to execute different behaviors based on the terrain users are walking on," says Edgar Lobaton, co-author of a paper on the work and an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University. "The framework we've created allows the AI in robotic prostheses to predict the type of terrain users will be stepping on, quantify the uncertainties associated with that prediction, and then incorporate that uncertainty into its decision-making." The researchers focused on distinguishing between six different terrains that require adjustments in a robotic prosthetic's behavior: tile, brick, concrete, grass, "upstairs" and "downstairs."


Chinese man makes own prosthetic limbs

Al Jazeera

Sun Jifa is a Chinese veteran who has created his own bionic arms and is now helping other amputees in his country. At age 27, Sun lost his hands in a fishing-related explosion. Unfortunately, he soon realised he could not afford the prosthetic hands recommended by the local hospital. After eight years of creating prototypes, he says he finally developed a working model that would allow him to grip, hold, and mimic other necessary movements via a system of pulleys and wires. "Up to now, my artificial limbs are beautiful and can be designed with the help of the disabled person's own motivation," Sun explains.


Good news for lazy joggers: Scientists develop ankle 'exoskeleton' that makes running easier

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Couch potatoes trying to get in shape could one day be helped along their fitness journey by an ankle exoskeleton that makes it easier and less tiring to run. The robotic device attaches to the ankle of joggers and was found in lab tests to slash energy expenditure by 14 per cent when compared to standard running shoes. It was created by robotics experts at Stanford University and funded in part by sporting behemoth Nike. The engineers behind the project say the equipment currently only works on a treadmill and when the device is hooked up to a machine via cables. However, they are working to make the exoskeleton portable and lightweight and easy to integrate into future running equipment.


Deep Voice 2: Multi-Speaker Neural Text-to-Speech

Neural Information Processing Systems

We introduce a technique for augmenting neural text-to-speech (TTS) with low-dimensional trainable speaker embeddings to generate different voices from a single model. As a starting point, we show improvements over the two state-of-the-art approaches for single-speaker neural TTS: Deep Voice 1 and Tacotron. We introduce Deep Voice 2, which is based on a similar pipeline with Deep Voice 1, but constructed with higher performance building blocks and demonstrates a significant audio quality improvement over Deep Voice 1. We improve Tacotron by introducing a post-processing neural vocoder, and demonstrate a significant audio quality improvement. We then demonstrate our technique for multi-speaker speech synthesis for both Deep Voice 2 and Tacotron on two multi-speaker TTS datasets.


Incredible moment a British Paralympian swimmer takes her first steps wearing a robotic exoskeleton

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Incredible footage shows the moment a British Paralympian swimmer with cerebral palsy stands up and takes her first steps wearing a robotic exoskeleton. Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take the special walk with the help of state-of-the-art technology developed in Japan -- giving her a day she will never forget. In the video, the swimmer from Ware, Hertfordshire, smiled nervously as she took her'first' tentative steps. She went on to giggle when a bystander said'You're running, Grace.' Swimmer Ms Harvey holds the European record for the 200 metre (656 feet) Individual Medley and is presently the British number one in the 100 metre (328 feet) backstroke event. She is currently training in the city of Suzuka, Japan, ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics in August.


How Artificial Intelligence is Improving Assistive Technology - The Tech Edvocate

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The advances in technology could mean more for society than just new educational technology and virtual reality video games. People with disabilities are finding innovative ways to put artificial intelligence to work with their current conditions. As the science improves, assistive technology will continue producing new and improved platforms to help create a better standard of living for those individuals. Are you interested in the myriad of ways that assistive technology is changing with the improved status of artificial intelligence? These four examples should give you a great idea of what's possible when you integrate these two fields.