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Autonomic Computing


Scientists have built the world's first living, self-healing robots

#artificialintelligence

Scientists have created the world's first living, self-healing robots using stem cells from frogs. Named xenobots after the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) from which they take their stem cells, the machines are less than a millimeter (0.04 inches) wide -- small enough to travel inside human bodies. They can walk and swim, survive for weeks without food, and work together in groups. These are "entirely new life-forms," said the University of Vermont, which conducted the research with Tufts University's Allen Discovery Center. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have the ability to develop into different cell types.


Automated Self-Healing of Residential CPE - Mariner Human-Centered Automation for CSPs.

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Measure success rates of self-healing actions and analyze targeted devices to understand root causes. Costly calls to help desk end up being resolved by simple remote actions. Customer satisfaction is impaired by problems even if the customer is able to resolve themselves. CSP resources tied up applying predictable and repeatable actions to resolve problems. Signature Filters Machine learning algorithms identify CPE with problems and remote fix likely to resolve.


Cloud5 HDX: Predictive, Self-Healing Network Management - Cloud5 Communications

#artificialintelligence

Cloud5 HDX is a predictive, AI-powered solution that identifies and resolves network health issues before they impact guests across applications, including Internet, Voice, Guest Service, IOT, and more. With business intelligence and role-based views of the hotel technology ecosystem, the hardware-agnostic HDX platform boosts guest satisfaction, reduces outages & network costs by managing every aspect of the guest experience proactively. Our experience and knowledge are changing the way the industry thinks about hotel communications and networks, and how they deliver the guest experience. HDX is live in more than100 hotels today, aggregating and analyzing data.


AI helps improve and smooth IT service delivery, survey shows ZDNet

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Artificial intelligence promises to enable machines or bots to take on the heavy-duty work of many parts of enterprises. Now, there are increasingly more initiatives, as well as vendor products, that will autonomously take on the heavy-duty work of information technology departments as well. The automation of IT functions has been evolving for decades, of course -- from job-scheduling systems in the 1990s to self-healing systems introduced more than a decade ago. These days, IT automation goes by many names -- such as autonomous systems, self-driving systems or bots. Lately, more of it is falling under the moniker of AIOps, joining the parade of xOps methodologies, promising to apply AI and machine learning to mechanize, standardize and automate the delivery of IT services.


AI Powers 'Self-Healing' Technology

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Software company Adobe Inc. uses an AI-based program to automate about 25 core IT tasks that were previously done by employees. The company spent about nine months developing the program using open-source technology, said Chief Information Officer Cynthia Stoddard. It has been in use for about a year. "We wanted to look at issues that we could automate and get the human element out," Ms. Stoddard said. One thing the new system does: It automatically fixes failures in data-batching.


Self-healing space suits among 18 ideas to receive NASA funding

Engadget

It once required an open mind and an active imagination to believe we could launch humans into space. Now, we take human space flight for granted, but we still need that out-of-the-box thinking to push the boundaries of exploration in this solar system and beyond. That's where NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program comes in. It's meant to foster ideas that sound borderline science fiction but have the potential to become new technologies. Today, NASA announced 18 innovative concepts that will receive NIAC funding.


Modeling muscle

Science

Adaptive behaviors ranging from self-assembly to self-healing showcase the ability of such systems to sense and adapt to dynamic environments based on signaling between living cells. This signaling takes on many forms--biochemical, mechanical, and electrical--and uncovering it has become as much the purview of regenerative medicine as of fundamental biology. We cannot reverse-engineer native tissues if we do not understand the fundamental design rules and principles that govern their assembly from the bottom up (1). Movement is fundamental to many living systems and driven primarily by skeletal muscle in human bodies. Disease or damage that limits the functionality of skeletal muscle severely affects human health, mobility, and quality of life.


McLaren reveal futuristic race car for 2050 featuring AI co-pilot

#artificialintelligence

McLaren have given fans their take on what the future looks like as they presented a futuristic race car that can take to the tracks in 2050. McLaren Applied Technologies, the sister company of the Formula One team, worked extensively gathering opinions from fans of the sport and now present the 2050: the MCLExtreme which features an on-board artificial intelligence co-pilot, an electric battery that can be folded away and self-healing tyres. The work done by MAT encapsulates more than just the race car for the drivers in three decades time. They have also extensively given their thoughts on developments in driver human performance, racing tracks of the future and the fan experience we can expect to see in 2050. McLaren's research also looked at the tracks of the future and how the overall fan experience would go on to differ from now Pelosi says she is ready to discuss shutdown with Trump'any time' 'The Deuce's' Emily Meade wants intimacy coordinators on all sets In an extensive breakdown of the various elements that the MCLExtreme includes, fans raved given it is a 500km/h rear-wheel-drive electric car powered by a'foldable battery moulded to the aerodynamic package'.


McLaren reveal futuristic race car for 2050 featuring AI co-pilot and self-healing tyres

Daily Mail - Science & tech

McLaren have given fans their take on what the future looks like as they presented a futuristic race car that can take to the tracks in 2050. McLaren Applied Technologies, the sister company of the Formula One team, worked extensively gathering opinions from fans of the sport and now present the 2050: the MCLExtreme which features an on-board artificial intelligence co-pilot, an electric battery that can be folded away and self-healing tyres. The work done by MAT encapsulates more than just the race car for the drivers in three decades time. They have also extensively given their thoughts on developments in driver human performance, racing tracks of the future and the fan experience we can expect to see in 2050. McLaren's research also looked at the tracks of the future and how the overall fan experience would go on to differ from now Savannah Spurlock's mother hopes her daughters is still alive Octomom walks '11 miles a day' to destress from eight children In an extensive breakdown of the various elements that the MCLExtreme includes, fans raved given it is a 500km/h rear-wheel-drive electric car powered by a'foldable battery moulded to the aerodynamic package'.


Self-healing material could be a breakthrough for humanoid robots

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Researchers at US university Carnegie Mellon have created a new electrically conductive material that can repair itself, presenting new opportunities for soft robotics and wearable technology. Combining properties of metal and plastic, the supple, stretchy material can be used to make circuits that stay operational even after sustaining physical damage. The discovery opens up the possibility that robots may one day have sensor-laden skin that can repair itself like a human's, or that we could sport ultra-thin wearable devices on our bodies for long periods of time without them degrading. "This could have important applications in areas like wearable computing, where you want circuits you can incorporate into textiles or place on your skin, and just like natural skin if you get bruised or cut, your skin is able to repair itself," says Carmel Majidi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, in a video produced by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). "Our material also has this property."