Scripts & Frames


Your dog can remember all those silly things you've done: Canines have 'episodic' memories, just like humans

Daily Mail

Previously, evidence that animals use episodic memory has been hard to come by, as it's impossible to ask an animal, in this case a dog, what they remember (stock image) Dogs trained using the trick can watch a person perform an action and carry out the action themselves. They then carried out another round of training in which the dogs were trained to lie down after watching the human action, no matter what it was. Dogs trained using the trick can watch a person perform an action and carry out the action themselves. They then carried out another round of training in which the dogs were trained to lie down after watching the human action, no matter what it was.


MI9-Ch24-SchankDeJong.pdf

Classics (Collection 2)

Conceptual Dependency began to rely more on underlying primitives for the representation of the similarities in meaning that transcend the particular words of a language (Schank, 1975). We built an inference program (Schank and Rieger, 1974) that exploited the properties of the primitive concepts uncovered by the parser and derived new information from them. The end product of such an inference procedure was a connected causal chain of events that represented the implicit and explicit information in a text (Schank, 1974). At this point we began to program a computer understanding system that would attempt to process input texts.


MI9-Ch24-SchankDeJong.pdf

Classics (Collection 2)

Conceptual Dependency began to rely more on underlying primitives for the representation of the similarities in meaning that transcend the particular words of a language (Schank, 1975). We built an inference program (Schank and Rieger, 1974) that exploited the properties of the primitive concepts uncovered by the parser and derived new information from them. The end product of such an inference procedure was a connected causal chain of events that represented the implicit and explicit information in a text (Schank, 1974). At this point we began to program a computer understanding system that would attempt to process input texts.


27 Representation and Understanding of Text

Classics (Collection 2)

Actors, actions and objects in our conceptual schema must correspond to real world actors, actions, and objects. To treat this sentence conceptually as (actor: Mary; action: hurt; object: John) violates the rule that conceptual actions must correspond to real world actions. 'Hurt' here is a resultant state of 576 SCHANK In conceptual dependency representation, actor-action complexes are indicated by 4), denoting a mutual dependency between actor and action; object-state complexes are indicated by 4.4.


27 Representation and Understanding of Text

Classics (Collection 2)

Actors, actions and objects in our conceptual schema must correspond to real world actors, actions, and objects. To treat this sentence conceptually as (actor: Mary; action: hurt; object: John) violates the rule that conceptual actions must correspond to real world actions. 'Hurt' here is a resultant state of 576 SCHANK In conceptual dependency representation, actor-action complexes are indicated by 4), denoting a mutual dependency between actor and action; object-state complexes are indicated by 4.4.


Purposive Understanding

Classics

Conceptual Dependency began to rely more on underlying primitives for the representation of the similarities in meaning that transcend the particular words of a language (Schank, 1975). We built an inference program (Schank and Rieger, 1974) that exploited the properties of the primitive concepts uncovered by the parser and derived new information from them. The end product of such an inference procedure was a connected causal chain of events that represented the implicit and explicit information in a text (Schank, 1974). At this point we began to program a computer understanding system that would attempt to process input texts.


Representation and understanding of text

Classics

Actors, actions and objects in our conceptual schema must correspond to real world actors, actions, and objects. To treat this sentence conceptually as (actor: Mary; action: hurt; object: John) violates the rule that conceptual actions must correspond to real world actions. 'Hurt' here is a resultant state of 576 SCHANK In conceptual dependency representation, actor-action complexes are indicated by 4), denoting a mutual dependency between actor and action; object-state complexes are indicated by 4.4.


The primitive ACTs of conceptual dependency

Classics

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A Framework for Representing Knowledge

Classics

Reprinted in Patrick Winston (ed.), The Psychology of Computer Vision, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1975.Direct link to PDF. MIT-AI Laboratory Memo 306, June