Simulation of Human Behavior


Study will ask 10,000 New Yorkers to share life's data

Daily Mail

The study leaders aim to recruit 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a range of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. Researchers hope the results will illuminate the interplay between health, behavior and circumstances, potentially shedding new light on conditions ranging from asthma to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers hope the results will illuminate the interplay between health, behavior and circumstances, potentially shedding new light on conditions ranging from asthma to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers hope the results of The Human Project will illuminate the interplay between health, behavior and circumstances, potentially shedding new light on conditions ranging from asthma to Alzheimer's disease


'Human Project' Study Will Ask 10,000 to Share Life's Data

U.S. News

In this Thursday, June 15, 2017, photo, people walk inside the Oculus, the new transit station at the World Trade Center Thursday, June 15, 2017, in New York. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting 10,000 New Yorkers early next year for a study so sweeping it's called "The Human Project." They'll be asked to share a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events.


Left handedness makes you more likely to be good at maths

Daily Mail

Left-handers exhibit, on average, a more developed right brain hemisphere, which is specialised for processes such as spatial reasoning and the ability to rotate mental representations of objects. Also, the corpus callosum – the bundle of nerve cells connecting the two brain hemispheres – tends to be larger in left-handers. Left-handers exhibit, on average, a more developed right brain hemisphere, which is specialised for processes such as spatial reasoning, the ability to rotate mental representations of objects, creativity, imagination and impulse. Left-handers seem to have, on average, an edge when solving demanding mathematical tasks – at least during primary school and high school.


Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything But Bleed

WIRED

Back then, there weren't any good models to study the female reproductive system, let alone how it responded to drugs. Today, her team announced a miniature female reproductive tract made of human and mouse tissues that secretes a 28-day cycle of hormones just like the real thing--except it fits in the palm of your hand. While Woodruff used mouse tissue for her ovaries, the other researchers developed their mini-organs from tissues donated by women undergoing surgery for gynecological issues. "We think this will radically change the way we study a lot of human systems, not just the female reproductive tract."


George A. Miller, Cognitive Psychology Pioneer, Dies at 92

AITopics Original Links

Psychological research was in a kind of rut in 1955 when George A. Miller, a professor at Harvard, delivered a paper titled "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two," which helped set off an explosion of new thinking about thinking and opened a new field of research known as cognitive psychology. The dominant form of psychological study at the time, behaviorism, had rejected Freud's theories of "the mind" as too intangible, untestable and vaguely mystical. Its researchers instead studied behavior in laboratories, observing and recording test subjects' responses to carefully administered stimuli. "George Miller, more than anyone else, deserves credit for the existence of the modern science of mind," the Harvard psychologist and author Steven Pinker said in an interview.


Next up: Humans, systems team in cognitive computing

AITopics Original Links

"These increasingly challenging times need organizations to make tighter decisions in tighter timelines with the consequence of each decision going up," Lemnios said. These trends, in Fenn's view, are "augmenting humans with technology--for example, an employee with a wearable computing device; machines replacing humans--for example, a cognitive virtual assistant acting as an automated customer representative; and humans and machines working alongside each other--for example, a mobile robot working with a warehouse employee to move many boxes." At a time when humans are clearly reaching the limits of what we can absorb and understand, Gartner suggests the main benefit of having machines working alongside humans is the ability to access the best of both worlds (that is, productivity and speed from machines, emotional intelligence, and the ability to handle the unknown from humans). Gartner's research suggests that machines and systems can only benefit from a better understanding of human context, humans, and human emotion.


What is cognitive modeling? - Definition from WhatIs.com

#artificialintelligence

Such a model can be used to simulate or predict human behavior or performance on tasks similar to the ones modeled. Some highly sophisticated programs model the intellectual processes of specific individuals; techniques such as discrepancy detection are used to improve these complex models. Discrepancy detection systems signal when there is a difference between the individual's actual state or behavior and the expected state or behavior as per the cognitive model; that information is then used to increase the complexity of the model. Forsythe predicts that computers with embedded cognitive machines might be produced within the next ten years.


Virtual Human

#artificialintelligence

A Bot monitoring tool that will capture user questions to the bot and send them to a slack channel. Any time, the bot does not have an answer, it will ping a human in slack and then the human will provide the answer to the bot. In turn, the bot will respond to the user.


Why is the military doing medical training on live animals? California lawmakers are asking.

Los Angeles Times

Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) and Joe Heck (R-Nevada) and nearly 70 bipartisan members of the U.S. House want to know how the military plans to stop using live animals in medical combat-trauma training. A letter from Speier and Heck, signed by the others, points to recent research by the Department of Defense that using simulated human tissue rather than live animals is cheaper and provides better training. But according to its own studies, simulations are more effective than maiming and killing animals for medical training," Speier said in a news release. The members are asking for specifics on the cost of using live animals versus using simulation-based teaching models, how many animals each military branch used for combat training in fiscal 2015, what regulations or policies still require the use of live tissue in training and what the department is doing to stop using live animals.


The CONTENTED will inherit the Earth, say researchers (but it's bad new for the glum)

Daily Mail

It found those who survived were more content, and valued long term happiness more that short terms gains. Cornell researchers created a series of algorithms to model how simulated humans coped. The findings offer scientific support to the ancient philosophical insights from China, Greece and India, which encourage cultivating long-term contentment or life satisfaction rather than grasping at the fleeting joy of instant gratification, the researchers said. The findings offer scientific support to the ancient philosophical insights from China, Greece and India, which encourage cultivating long-term contentment or life satisfaction rather than grasping at the fleeting joy of instant gratification, the researchers said.