Airport


CES 2020: A smart city oasis

Robohub

Like the city that hosts the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) there is a lot of noise on the show floor. Sifting through the lights, sounds and people can be an arduous task even for the most experienced CES attendees. Hidden past the North Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC) is a walkway to a tech oasis housed in the Westgate Hotel. This new area hosting SmartCity/IoT innovations is reminiscent of the old Eureka Park complete with folding tables and ballroom carpeting. The fact that such enterprises require their own area separate from the main halls of the LVCC and the startup pavilions of the Sands Hotel is an indication of how urbanization is being redefined by artificial intelligence.


ANA starts testing autonomous bus operation at Haneda Airport

The Japan Times

ANA Holdings Inc., the operator of All Nippon Airways Co., said Wednesday it has started testing a semi-autonomous bus that will transport passengers and staff working at Tokyo's Haneda Airport. The company will conduct the test with the electric bus capable of carrying 57 passengers on a 1.9-kilometer route through the end of this month, aiming to start trial operation later in the year. The vehicle, with level-3 automation, allows drivers to turn their attention away from driving and engage in different tasks. "As the Tokyo Olympics are approaching, we hope more passengers from around the world will see our latest technology," ANA Senior Executive Vice President Shinzo Shimizu said in a ceremony at the airport. In 2018, the number of passengers who arrived at and departed from the airport increased 2.1 percent to 85 million, according to Japan Airport Terminal Co. which manages the Haneda Airport facilities.


Passenger waiting for flight takes over airport screen to play video games

FOX News

No word on whether or not the passenger made it to the next level. A passenger waiting for a flight at an Oregon airport needed a bit more screen space for his video game so he plugged his Playstation 4 into a computer screen that had been displaying a map of the airport. Kara Simonds, a spokeswoman for the Port of Portland, told KXL-AM radio in an on-air interview that Portland International Airport staff asked the man to stop gaming on the public map display. He asked if he could finish his game. They said no, and the situation resolved peacefully.


British Airways To Launch Guide Robots At London Heathrow Airport

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British Airways is experimenting with a new tool for guiding passengers through its massive London Heathrow hub: guide robots. Starting in 2020, the flag carrier of the United Kingdom will deploy an array of autonomous robots in Terminal 5 of its London Heathrow base to help guide passengers through the airport and answer basic questions. The problem is harder to solve than it may initially sound. Getting around Heathrow requires deep knowledge of the dozens of storefronts, duty-free shops and lounges in the terminals as well as the ability to navigate through multiple floors and throngs of passengers who may not always be paying attention to their surroundings. To help guide passengers, the new robots will not only have to know where they are at all times but also be able to navigate through the airport without getting lost or running into travelers.


Airlines avoid Iran and Iraq airspace

The Japan Times

PARIS – Several international airlines said Wednesday they would avoid Iranian and Iraqi airspace after Tehran fired ballistic missiles at bases housing U.S. troops in Iraq. Lufthansa and its Austrian Airlines unit nonetheless decided to maintain flights to the Iranian capital, Tehran, this week, a statement said. Iran launched more than 20 missiles at bases housing U.S. troops in the early hours, officials in Washington and Tehran said. Iran's supreme leader called the attacks a "slap in the face" after a U.S. drone strike killed Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani near Baghdad international airport last week. In Germany, Lufthansa said it had halted overflights of Iran and Iraq until further notice.


British Airways plans to trial A.I.-powered robots at Heathrow Airport

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British Airways is set to trial artificial intelligence powered robots at Heathrow Terminal 5. In an announcement Thursday, the airline said the autonomous robots had been programmed to "interact with passengers" in multiple languages and would be able to answer "thousands" of questions, providing passengers with services such as real-time flight information. The robots are being provided by a technology company called BotsAndUs and the trial will start in 2020. British Airways added that the robots would also have the capacity to escort passengers to locations such as special assistance zones. "These smart robots are the latest innovation allowing us to free up our people to deal with immediate issues and offer that one-on-one service we know our customers appreciate," Ricardo Vidal, who is head of innovation at British Airways, said in a statement.


The Amazing Ways Dubai Airport Uses Artificial Intelligence

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As one of the world's busiest airports, (ranked No. 3 in 2018 according to Airports Council International's world traffic report), Dubai International Airport is also a leader in using artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) leads the Arab world with its adoption of artificial intelligence in other sectors and areas of life and has a government that prioritizes artificial intelligence including an AI strategy and Ministry of Artificial Intelligence with a mandate to invest in technologies and AI tools. The Emirates Ministry of the Interior said that by 2020, immigration officers would no longer be needed in the UAE. They will be replaced by artificial intelligence. The plan is to have people just walk through an AI-powered security system to be scanned without taking off shoes or belts or emptying pockets.


How the Utilization of IoT is Benefitting the Airport Security

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The digital networking of camera systems presents the prospects of improving the ways, where resources are used to design procedures efficiently and also reduce costs. FREMONT, CA: As per a research, firm Statista, there are more than 20 billion end devices that have been already networked through the Internet, and by the next year, the number will increase more than three times by. The end devices have become more intelligent and efficient, which is driven by the advancement conducted in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and even 5G. IoT helps the cameras to assist the users in increasing their understanding of the behaviors of the passengers and employees. The knowledge about different technologies opens up new opportunities for advancing the procedures and reduces downtime.


Air France Hopes to Reduce Delays With Self-Driving Luggage Carts

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A multitude of factors can contribute to a flight being delayed, but Air France, who partnered with a handful of other companies, is testing the world's first self-driving luggage tug in hopes of streamlining airport operations and improving the speed of getting luggage to and from an aircraft. The vehicle, known as the AT135 baggage tractor, began official testing at France's Toulouse-Blagnac airport last month on November 15. To the untrained eye it looks like the myriad of vehicles you already see scurrying around the airport tarmac while waiting for a flight, including a cab with a seat, steering wheel, and all the controls needed for a human driver. But look closer and you'll be able to spot some of the telltale hardware upgrades of an autonomous vehicle, including laser scanning LIDAR sensors on the roof and bumper that complement less visible sensors like GPS and front and rear cameras providing a 360-degree view around the tug. Climb inside the tug and you'll also find a big switch allowing it to be switched between manual and autonomous modes, as well as an oversized touchscreen showing a map of the airport and all the gates the vehicle is designed to service.


The Rise of Smart Airports: A Skift Deep Dive

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In late September, Beijing unveiled to the world Daxing, a glimmering $11 billion airport showcasing technologies such as robots and facial recognition scanners that many other airports worldwide are either adopting or are now considering. Daxing fits the description of what experts hail as a "smart airport." Just as a smart home is where internet-connected devices control functions like security and thermostats, smart airports use cloud-based technologies to simplify and improve services. Of course, many of the nearly 4,000 scheduled service airports across the world are still embarrassingly antiquated. The good news for aviation is that more facilities are investing, finally, to better serve airlines, suppliers, and travelers. This year, airports worldwide will spend $11.8 billion -- 68 percent more than the level three years ago -- on information technology, according to an estimate published this month by SITA (Société Internationale de Telecommunications Aeronautiques, an airline-owned tech provider). A few trends are driving the rise of smart airports. Flight volumes are increasing, so airports need better ways to process flyers. Airports need better ways to make money, too, by encouraging passengers to spend more in their shops and restaurants. Data is growing in importance. Everything happening at an airport, from where passengers are flowing to which items are selling in stores, generates data. Airports can analyze this data to spot opportunities for eking out fatter profits. They can sell the data to third-parties as well.