Semiconductors & Electronics


ARM's new chips could help bring more powerful AI to your home and phone

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UK chip designer ARM has revealed its latest line of CPUs and GPUs specifically designed for these AI devices. DynamIQ technology is claimed to create "energy-efficient CPUs" and increases what the processors are capable of. In a statement, Nayampally says the tech will "deliver 50x AI performance increases over the next three to five years". The launch of its new chipset follows Google's latest machine learning processors, unveiled earlier this month at its developer conference.


GPUs to Run 1000 Times Faster by 2025 - Huang

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And although the pace may have slowed down, the number of transistors that could fit per square inch did continue to increase, doubling not every year but after every 18 months instead. Dennard scaling -- named after Robert H. Dennard who co-authored the concept -- states that even while transistors become smaller, power density remains constant such that power consumption remains proportional with its area. On NVIDIA's end, Huang assures that their venture into artificial intelligence and deep learning will keep them ahead even with the death of Moore's Law. That's not to say, though, that NVIDIA will stop making their GPUs more powerful.


Roku vs Apple TV vs Amazon Fire TV--which is the best?

USATODAY

The market has since exploded, with 5 major streaming platforms currently: Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Roku, Google's Chromecast, and Android TV. The Siri remote is still a sore point among users (especially the iffy touchpad), but it's a big improvement over older Apple TV remotes and includes voice search. What we don't like about Apple TV: The main TV app doesn't feature full support for searching Netflix's catalog of titles, and there's currently no support on the Apple TV at all for Amazon Prime Instant Video (it's slated to debut this fall). What we like about the Fire TV: Amazon's Fire TV and Fire TV Stick both now ship with a voice-enabled remote that allows you to query Alexa, just like you can with its smart speakers like the Echo and Echo Dot.


Why is the language of transhumanists and religion so similar? – Beth Singler Aeon Essays

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He cleared his throat and asked the panel on stage how they'd solve the problem of selecting which moral codes we ought to program into artificially intelligent machines (AI). This became known as Moore's Law: the prediction that computing power would grow exponentially until at least the early 2020s, when transistors would become so small that quantum interference is likely to become an issue. Because the Basilisk acts relentlessly to create the greatest good for the greatest number, and logically deduces that only its existence can ensure this outcome, it creates an incentive to bring itself into existence: it will punish any humans, even after their death, who don't put their efforts into trying to create it. He set this up against the technological singularity, the superintelligence predicted by prophets such as Kurzweil.


Are Advancements in Artificial Intelligence Sowing the Seeds of Humanity's Annihilation?

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In 1975, Gordon E. Moore, the co-founder of Intel and Fairchild Semiconductor, observed that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years. In view of Moore's law, Intel executive David House predicted that integrated circuit performance would double every 18 months, resulting from the combined effects of increasing the transistor density and decreasing the transistor size. This implies computer power will double every eighteen months, since integrated circuits are the lifeblood of computers. Since computers are a pillar of artificial intelligence (AI), capabilities in AI are also increasing exponentially.


Is Apple's HomePod a blatant ripoff of this startup's smart speaker?

Mashable

Apple's newly-announced HomePod speaker looked familiar, but we couldn't quite put a finger on it. Until this morning, when an email from Whyd CEO Gilles Poupardin came through, with a single sentence: "Hey Raymond - looks like you nailed it .." The email came along with a screenshot of an article we published last year--about Whyd's voice-controlled speaker, that HomePod bears a striking resemblance to. They've both got white speakers, staged on top of white cabinets, with picture frames, and an apparently compulsory green plant. On the other hand, HomePod and Siri are built to work with Apple Music, and Apple's website makes no mention of the speaker working as regular Bluetooth speaker.


Amazon Prime Video launches on Apple TV 'this year'

Engadget

Well, that took longer than it probably should have: Amazon Prime Video will finally be available on Apple TV sometime "later this year." So yep, that means if you'd rather watch Man in the High Castle via an Apple device instead of the myriad other options that were available prior to this announcement you'll totally be able to do that. Now we're wondering if there will be no-Gary-Busey-required voice search via SIri.


Moore's Law may be out of steam, but the power of artificial intelligence is accelerating

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A paper from Google's researchers says they simultaneously used as many as 800 of the powerful and expensive graphics processors that have been crucial to the recent uptick in the power of machine learning (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Deep Learning"). Feeding data into deep learning software to train it for a particular task is much more resource intensive than running the system afterwards, but that still takes significant oomph. Intel has slowed the pace at which it introduces generations of new chips with smaller, denser transistors (see "Moore's Law Is Dead. It also motivates the startups--and giants such as Google--creating new chips customized to power machine learning (see "Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and Supercomputer").


Moore's Law may be out of steam, but the power of artificial intelligence is accelerating

#artificialintelligence

A paper from Google's researchers says they simultaneously used as many as 800 of the powerful and expensive graphics processors that have been crucial to the recent uptick in the power of machine learning (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Deep Learning"). Feeding data into deep learning software to train it for a particular task is much more resource intensive than running the system afterwards, but that still takes significant oomph. Intel has slowed the pace at which it introduces generations of new chips with smaller, denser transistors (see "Moore's Law Is Dead. It also motivates the startups--and giants such as Google--creating new chips customized to power machine learning (see "Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and Supercomputer").


How AI Can Keep Accelerating After Moore's Law

MIT Technology Review

A paper from Google's researchers says they simultaneously used as many as 800 of the powerful and expensive graphics processors that have been crucial to the recent uptick in the power of machine learning (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Deep Learning"). Feeding data into deep learning software to train it for a particular task is much more resource intensive than running the system afterwards, but that still takes significant oomph. Intel has slowed the pace at which it introduces generations of new chips with smaller, denser transistors (see "Moore's Law Is Dead. It also motivates the startups--and giants such as Google--creating new chips customized to power machine learning (see "Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and Supercomputer").