Motorsports


Watch: This motorcycle-riding robot is no match for one of the most successful racers of all time

ZDNet

We all know the robots are coming. That probably inspires some complicated feelings. So, it's comforting when a three-year development effort to make a robot that can set a speed record results in a human victory... by a wide margin. Yamaha and robotics developer SRI have been working on a humanoid that can ride an unmodified motorcycle. The goal was to beat the lap times of one of the most successful motorcycle racers of all time, Valentino Rossi.


Intel's Khosrowshahi: 'We're Leading the Way' in A.I. Processors

#artificialintelligence

Khosrowshahi is a co-founder, along with Naveen Rao, another Intel executive, of a startup called Nervana Systems. I profiled Nervana in October of 2015 for a Barron's cover story about how the rise of cloud computing and artificial intelligence was changing the objectives, and the design, of silicon. After that article, in which it was posited that Intel's microprocessor business might be in trouble, Rao and Khosrowshahi's company was bought by Intel, in August of last year, for terms that were not disclosed, but speculated by the New York Times's Steve Lohr to be north of $400 million. Rao and Khosrowshahi have both been on the road in support of Intel this year. Rao was at Intel's Xeon unveiling in July in New York.


Intel's Khosrowshahi: 'We're Leading the Way' in A.I. Processors

#artificialintelligence

Khosrowshahi is a co-founder, along with Naveen Rao, another Intel executive, of a startup called Nervana Systems. I profiled Nervana in October of 2015 for a Barron's cover story about how the rise of cloud computing and artificial intelligence was changing the objectives, and the design, of silicon. After that article, in which it was posited that Intel's microprocessor business might be in trouble, Rao and Khosrowshahi's company was bought by Intel, in August of last year, for terms that were not disclosed, but speculated by the New York Times's Steve Lohr to be north of $400 million. Rao and Khosrowshahi have both been on the road in support of Intel this year. Rao was at Intel's Xeon unveiling in July in New York.


Robohub Podcast #245: High-Performance Autonomous Vehicles, with Chris Gerdes

Robohub

In this interview, Gerdes discusses developing a model for high-performance control of a vehicle; their autonomous race car, an Audi TTS named'Shelley,' and how its autonomous performance compares to ameteur and professional race car drivers; and an autonomous, drifting Delorean named'MARTY.' Chris Gerdes is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS) and Director of the Revs Program at Stanford. His laboratory studies how cars move, how humans drive cars and how to design future cars that work cooperatively with the driver or drive themselves. When not teaching on campus, he can often be found at the racetrack with students, instrumenting historic race cars or trying out their latest prototypes for the future.


Microsoft's AI is so good it steered Renault into bottom of the F1 league

#artificialintelligence

Microsoft on Sunday bragged its artificial intelligence technology is behind the, er, success of the massively underperforming Renault Formula One team. In a poorly timed bit of marketing, the Redmond software giant talked up its partnership with the racing team just as the latter finds itself sitting 433 points behind leader Mercedes. The idea, says Microsoft, is to use the machine learning to perform calculations and analysis that would otherwise take up the time of a team of engineers. Additionally, the Windows giant says the Renault design team is using its HoloLens augmented reality platform to study and improve car and engine designs – something that d'Imbleval sees not only more successful Formula One teams, but also the fans themselves, taking up in the coming years.


Project Cars 2 review: A vast journey through motorsport history that frustratingly isn't ready for release

The Independent

From the questionable AI decisions, to the infuriating pit stop strategy, to the fact that if you want to string a fair few races together combined with qualifying, you'll have to write off half the day because you'll spend so long trying to get your set-up right. But given my love of the first edition – so much so that I was playing it the day before the release of Project Cars 2 – let's be fair and start with the good points. It's great that races are much harder to run away with, but at this low a difficulty the AI cars make stupid errors or run straight into you. The pit stop strategy is also a mess, with users required to pre-set stops before the race starts.


Mercedes-AMG's $2.8M Project One Hypercar Is Finally Here

WIRED

The 1.6-liter V6, which would look small in any car, makes roughly 700 horsepower, largely because it cranks at 11,000 rpm. The Merc gets another 500 horsepower from three electric motors--one on each front wheel, the third integrated into the engine. For good measure, the hybrid drive system also gives you up to 20 miles of all-electric propulsion, for when you need to sneak out in the middle of the night with it or roll into emissions-hating city centers. Carbon wheels and carbon ceramic brakes help keep weight down and the car in control.


Robots, Start Your Engines!

#artificialintelligence

A sensor's range--a limiting factor for autonomous driving--"has a very different meaning when you're traveling at higher speed, because the same…distance gives you much less time to react," says Chris Gerdes, a Stanford University professor of mechanical engineering whose lab studies racing to improve autonomous driving. And although the control algorithms that execute the vehicle's plans operate quickly, the algorithms interpreting camera and sensor data take much longer--which means the car has moved nearly the length of a bus by the time it makes sense of what it saw. It is also plausible that seeing high-performing autonomous racers will make consumers more confident in autonomous driving tech--although a lack of crashes in robot races might disappoint a few race fans. Devbots have performed high-speed demonstrations at several Formula E "ePrix" races, which feature Formula 1–like electric cars powered entirely by batteries.


Robots, Race Cars and Weather: Girl Scouts Offer New Badges

U.S. News

In this July 21, 2017 photo, Sylvia Acevedo, right, CEO of the Girl Scouts of the USA, assists a member of the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland as she builds a simple robotic arm during an introduction to the world of robotics in Owings Mills, Md. "It's really all about how do we capture that interest in science and technology," Acevedo said. "The other thing is the girls are learning not just how to do a specific skill but also how to think, how to think like an inventor, how to think like a creator, how to think like a maker. Those are the types of things that we want to ignite in the girls."


Robots, Race Cars and Weather: Girl Scouts Offer New Badges

U.S. News

Girl Scouts of all ages can now earn 23 new badges focused on science, technology, engineering and math, the largest addition of new badges in a decade. The effort takes a progressive approach to STEM and also nudges girls to become citizen scientists using the great outdoors as their laboratory.