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A reporter's FOIA request scored details on EA Sports College Football

Washington Post - Technology News

Since April of 2020, Brown has been writing full time on college sports financing and licensing for his newsletter and podcast. An entire section of his website is dedicated to public records he's obtained in his reporting, including the financial reports and coaching contracts at certain schools. Some schools and institutions charge processing fees for digging up records requests, and Brown estimates that he's spent somewhere in the "low three-figures" procuring records from institutions. To Brown, EA Sports' game -- and whether players will appear in it -- is a clear, practical example of how players may financially benefit from the shift in long-standing NCAA policies.


A simple guide to Bidirectional LSTM(with Keras implementation)

#artificialintelligence

A Bidirectional LSTM, or biLSTM, is a sequence processing model that consists of two LSTMs. One LSTM will carry forward pass information, Another LSTM will carry backward pass information. In bidirectional LSTM, Input flows in forward and backward directions to preserve information from the past and future. This fundamental modification makes biLSTM different than LSTM where input flow either forward or in a backward direction. With the above basic understanding, let's try to implement biLSTM on the IMDB dataset.


Investors see lots to like in Fan Controlled Football. Players have a harder time.

Washington Post - Technology News

The FCF's 150-plus players earn considerably less than their counterparts in other pro football leagues. The FCF offers $750 per week as base pay for quarterbacks; $550 for offensive linemen and tight ends; $350 for running backs and wide receivers; and $450 for defensive players. They can earn hundreds in bonuses each week for winning and via fan voting for individual categories such as best end zone celebration. The league estimates that between 50 and 70 players are awarded bonus money in some amount each week, with increased totals during the playoffs.


John Madden returning to cover of Madden NFL 23 video game

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. For the first time in two decades, late football legend John Madden will grace the cover of a Madden NFL video game. EA Sports on Wednesday announced that the Hall of Fame coach, who died in December, will appear on the cover of all three editions of this year's Madden NFL 23 video game. The covers will include him in different parts of his life, including as a coach and as a broadcaster.


John Madden's influence on EA's Madden games went way beyond the cover

Washington Post - Technology News

Madden, the former Super Bowl-winning coach of the Oakland Raiders, first leant his name to the video game series in 1988 with the stipulation that the game be realistic and representative of actual NFL football. That started with a requirement that the game feature 11 players on each side of the ball, a massive computational challenge for the hardware of the early 1990s. Once solved -- thanks in part to the help of developers at Bethesda Softworks and their game "Gridiron!"


Solving chain of thought problem of AI

#artificialintelligence

Two years back, NYU professors Gary Marcus and Ernest Davis published an article in MIT Technology Review on GPT-3. The authors asked GPT-3 a series of questions to expose its poor grasp of reality: "Yesterday I dropped my clothes off at the dry cleaner's, and I have yet to pick them up. GPT-3 replied, "I have a lot of clothes." Clearly, large language models like GPT-3 are not good at multi-step reasoning. "Fundamentally, language is about relating sentences that you hear, and systems like GPT-3 never do that.


The Morning After: Dyson's secret robot projects

Engadget

The NFL's rumored streaming service could debut in JulyDyson, the company that's recently branched out into hair curlers, air-purifying headphones and not cars, has revealed it has an entire division secretly developing robot prototypes for household chores. The company didn't detail any of the models specifically, but many look like robot arms adapted to do specialized home chores, like cleaning and tidying. Dyson also showed off its Perception Lab dedicated to robotic vision systems, environment detection and even mapping humans with sensors, cameras and thermal imaging systems. So why reveal its secret lab now? Well, Dyson's on a recruiting drive, looking for around 700 engineers to help finally make at least some of these ideas a reality in our homes.


Deshaun Watson accusers blast his record contract with Browns in HBO interview: 'A big screw you'

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A pair of women who are accusing Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson of sexual misconduct blasted the record contact he received with Cleveland after the team traded for him. Watson signed a record-setting $230 million, fully guaranteed contract with the Browns in March after he was traded from the Houston Texans. "It's just like a big screw you," one of Watson's accusers, Ashley Solis, said during an appearance on HBO's "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel," which is set to air Tuesday evening.


Digital Transformation Accelerators: A Service Science Perspective

#artificialintelligence

This talk explores digital transformation accelerators arising from two shocks – the pandemic and the future of artificial intelligence (AI). Presented by Jim Spohrer, retired IBM Executive, and member of the Board of Directors of the non-profit International Society of Service Innovation Professionals (ISSIP). In 2011 during IBM's Centennial Celebration, Jim Spohrer was recognized as an IBM Innovation Champion for his contributions to service science. Service science is one of the 100 innovations celebrated during IBM's Centennial as an IBM Icon of Progress. Will we get a copy of the deck?


AI may be searching you for guns the next time you go out in public

#artificialintelligence

When Peter George saw news of the racially motivated mass-shooting at the Tops supermarket in Buffalo last weekend, he had a thought he's often had after such tragedies. "Could our system have stopped it?" he said. But I think we could democratize security so that someone planning on hurting people can't easily go into an unsuspecting place." George is chief executive of Evolv Technology, an AI-based system meant to flag weapons, "democratizing security" so that weapons can be kept out of public places without elaborate checkpoints. As U.S. gun violence like the kind seen in Buffalo increases -- firearms sales reached record heights in 2020 and 2021 while the Gun Violence Archive reports 198 mass shootings since January -- Evolv has become increasingly popular, used at schools, stadiums, stores and other gathering spots. To its supporters, the system is a more effective and less obtrusive alternative to the age-old metal detector, making events both safer and more pleasant to attend. To its critics, however, Evolv's effectiveness has hardly been proved. And it opens up a Pandora's box of ethical issues in which convenience is paid for with RoboCop surveillance. "The idea of a kinder, gentler metal detector is a nice solution in theory to these terrible shootings," said Jay Stanley, senior policy analyst for the American Civil Liberties Union's project on speech, privacy, and technology. "But do we really want to create more ways for security to invade our privacy?