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Machine Learning Technologies at Tokyo 2020 Olympics

#artificialintelligence

National Olympic teams are using machine learning to gain an edge in competition over their opponents at the Tokyo Olympic Games 2020. Machine learning technologies are being used at the international sports event from athlete data tracking, coaches' real-time feedback that can tell athletes when to train and when to stop, to predicting sports injuries with algorithms. Machine learning algorithms analyze athlete data collected from multiple systems like Alibaba Group and Intel which partnered to run a 3D athlete-tracking system that allows coaches to probe into every minute movement of their Olympic athletes. The system relies on algorithms to understand the biomechanics of the movement of athletes captured by cameras and estimate the position of key body joints. As a field of artificial intelligence, computer vision enables machines to perform image processing tasks with the aim of imitating human vision.


Artificial Intelligence in Olympics Introduces a New Phase of Sporting

#artificialintelligence

'The show must go on,' an often heard sentence that makes absolute sense in the pandemic hit the world. Yes, it all became at the end of 2019 when Covid-19 was first reported in Wuhan. Later, the virus spread across the globe and pushed governments to impose strict lockdowns. An international sports event that was supposed to take place in 2020 got delayed and finally, when people started living with the virus in 2021, the IOC and Japan, the host country, came forward to go on with it. One of the most welcomed guests in the summer Tokyo Olympics is artificial intelligence.


Garmin Vivoactive 4 review: A sleek smartwatch that inspires goal-setting

Mashable

Before I tried it out, I wasn't sure who the vívoactive 4 was created for. Garmin calls it a "smart GPS smartwatch built for your active lifestyle," but that left me wondering: Is it for serious athletes? People who aren't very active but want to be? Two weeks and many miles of running later, I have a better idea. In a nutshell, the vívoactive 4 strikes me as a hybrid smartwatch, combining some essential features of a fitness watch with the look and feel of a classic smartwatch.


Robo Olympians? Olympics schedule packed with bots, AI, VR and more

#artificialintelligence

After being delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 Olympics schedule is in full swing, albeit without spectators in the stands. Aside from featuring top athletic competition from nations around the globe, the quadrennial event is also showcasing several cutting-edge innovations ranging from robotics and artificial intelligence to virtual reality training solutions, carrying on a tradition of Olympic tech innovation history. "The Olympic Games have always been a catalyst and showcase for innovation, and when Tokyo last hosted the event, in 1964, it saw satellites used to relay live pictures to a global audience for the first time, as well as the debuts of close-pickup microphones and slow-motion replays," reads a portion of an Olympic blog post. Historically, human beings have traditionally located, chased down and seized game balls during Olympic competitions. But at the 2020 games, spectators may catch a glimpse of a few bots retrieving these spheres and other equipment during gameplay.


Why Even the Fastest Human Can't Outrun Your House Cat

WIRED

This weekend, the fastest sprinters on the planet came together at the Tokyo Olympics to compete for the gold in the 100-meter dash. Lamont Marcell Jacobs crossed the finish line in 9.80 seconds to bring Italy its first gold in the event. In the women's race, Jamaica won the gold, silver, and bronze--a clean sweep led by Elaine Thompson-Herah, who smashed through a 33-year-old Olympic women's record with a time of 10.61 seconds. But neither of them could touch the legacy of Jamaica's eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt, who retired in 2017 but still boasts the title of fastest human alive. Bolt ran the 100 meters in 9.58 seconds.


NotCo gets its horn following $235M round to expand plant-based food products – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

NotCo, a food technology company making plant-based milk and meat replacements, wrapped up another funding round this year, a $235 million Series D round that gives it a $1.5 billion valuation. Tiger Global led the round and was joined by new investors, including DFJ Growth Fund, the social impact foundation, ZOMA Lab; athletes Lewis Hamilton and Roger Federer; and musician and DJ Questlove. Follow-on investors included Bezos Expeditions, Enlightened Hospitality Investments, Future Positive, L Catterton, Kaszek Ventures, SOSV and Endeavour Catalyst. This funding round follows an undisclosed investment in June from Shake Shack founder Danny Meyer through his firm EHI. In total, NotCo, with roots in both Chile and New York, has raised more than $350 million, founder and CEO Matias Muchnick told TechCrunch.


200 MPH Autonomous Cars Will Make History in World's First High-Speed Robo-Race

#artificialintelligence

Back in 2004, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge paved the way for autonomous vehicle development. Now, some of the innovators who have competed in that challenge are taking things further as advisors for the Indy Autonomous Challenge (IAC). Organized by Energy Systems Network and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, IAC is addressed to university teams from all over the world, who will compete for the $1 million grand prize. Hundreds of students from over 40 schools entered the first stage of the challenge. As of this month, the 10 final teams have been established, with more than 200 students from 19 universities.


What is the Difference Between The Learning Curve of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Machine Learning (ML) is about statistical patterns in the artificial data sets, while artificial intelligence (AI) is about causal patterns in the real world data sets. The term artificial intelligence was coined in 1956, but AI has become more popular today thanks to increased data volumes, advanced algorithms, and improvements in computing power and storage. Artificial intelligence (AI) makes it possible for machines to learn from experience, adjust to new inputs and perform human-like tasks. Artificial intelligence is important because it automates repetitive learning and discovery through data. Instead of automating manual tasks, AI performs frequent, high-volume, computerized tasks.


Say Hello To The Tokyo Olympic Robots

NPR Technology

A Field Support Robot was used to retrieve rugby balls on day three of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tokyo Stadium. Over the weekend, the FSR will help during track and field events. A Field Support Robot was used to retrieve rugby balls on day three of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tokyo Stadium. Over the weekend, the FSR will help during track and field events. The Field Support Robot is a good boy!


Say Hello To The Tokyo Olympic Robots

NPR Technology

A Field Support Robot was used to retrieve rugby balls on day three of the Tokyo Olympics. Over the weekend, the robot will help during track and field events. A Field Support Robot was used to retrieve rugby balls on day three of the Tokyo Olympics. Over the weekend, the robot will help during track and field events. The Field Support Robot is a good boy!