Goto

Collaborating Authors

Sports


Evaluating Soccer Player: from Live Camera to Deep Reinforcement Learning

#artificialintelligence

Scientifically evaluating soccer players represents a challenging Machine Learning problem. Unfortunately, most existing answers have very opaque algorithm training procedures; relevant data are scarcely accessible and almost impossible to generate. In this paper, we will introduce a two-part solution: an open-source Player Tracking model and a new approach to evaluate these players based solely on Deep Reinforcement Learning, without human data training nor guidance. Our tracking model was trained in a supervised fashion on datasets we will also release, and our Evaluation Model relies only on simulations of virtual soccer games. Combining those two architectures allows one to evaluate Soccer Players directly from a live camera without large datasets constraints.


What we want from Ubisoft Massive's open world Star Wars game

Washington Post - Technology News

In contrast to the 007 game announcement from IO Interactive, which was a match made in heaven, the response to the announcement of this game has been a bit more muted. The developers of "The Division" series have not had a great track record for releasing games that live up to expectations. The first game took about a year to right its ship and develop a healthy online community. The second game removed much of what the first game (eventually) got right, and although it was received critically well at the start, the game floundered as a live service quickly.


Indy has selected the AI-powered cars for its autonomous challenge race

Engadget

The Indy Autonomous Challenge has revealed the vehicle participating universities will have to program and race in October 2021: the Dallara IL-15 racecar. IAC has made the announcement during its press conference for CES 2021, where it also hosted discussions about the commercialization of autonomous vehicles and technology in motorsports. The competition, which has a $1.5 million prize purse, challenges universities to build AI algorithms that can power an IL-15 that has been fitted with hardware and controls that enable automation. Back in 2020, IAC announced that 37 universities from 11 countries registered to compete, with teams being composed of members with varying expertise. There are undergraduate and graduate student participants, as well as faculty and industry experts in AI, machine learning and robotics.


Playing video games when angry makes you a worse player, says study

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Playing video games can stir up a lot of emotions, but a new study indicates being upset or depressed when you log onto your favorite game can make you play worse. Researchers from Stanford University showed participants video clips intended to make them feel amused, enthusiastic, angry or sad and then compared how they performed on the highly popular soccer game FIFA 19. Gamers exposed to positive scenes -- especially ones that encouraged enthusiasm -- did far better against a computer opponent than ones who watch saddening or anger-inducing clips. Not only did they score more goals, they showed an increase in'approach tendency,' taking possession of the ball more often and having more shots hit the goal, which experts say stems from'extra motivation that comes from positive emotion.' Participants were shown various video clips before playing five matches of FIFA 19, the most popular console game of the year. 'In addition, we observed that players who have greater confidence in their abilities and get more physiologically involved in the game achieve better results,' the researchers told IFLScience.


Drone Racing League embraces sports betting in partnership with DraftKings

Engadget

Since the dawn of the drone era, enterprising pilots and enthusiasts have found ways to make money off their passion for flying. Thanks to a new partnership between the Drone Racing League and DraftKings, though, gamblers can now make money off of other people's passion for flying. While DraftKings can legally operate its daily fantasy sports business in 43 states, the company stresses that betting on drone races is currently only legal in Colorado, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Tennessee and New Jersey. "The sky is now the limit for DRL fans to get skin in the game, and we're thrilled to partner with DraftKings to transform our high-speed race competition into the ultimate sport to bet on," said DRL President Rachel Jacobson in a press release. Today's announcement makes drone racing the first aerial sport people can legally bet on, and Jacobson noted to Forbes that embracing betting is part of the company's plan to scale into an "ultimately mainstream sport."


'Hitman 3' goes knives out with a full-on mansion murder mystery

Washington Post - Technology News

The Dartmoor Estate level is so grand and well written, it's hard to see how the game's other levels in the final build will top it. But we can expect each one to be even bigger than the last. "Hitman" games are top of the industry when it comes to portraying parties and massive amounts of people across believable, everyday spaces. The last two titles took Agent 47 through NASCAR-like events on massive speedways, a fashion show in Paris, a civil revolution in Mumbai and even an idyllic American suburb, all crowded with people. The "Hitman" games come closest to achieving the grandeur of the dance party scenes in films like "John Wick" and "Collateral."


Sark latest 'Bama assistant multi-tasking before title game

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Steve Sarkisian is the latest Alabama coordinator to be drawing up game plans for a national title showdown before leaving for a new head coaching job. The top-ranked Crimson Tide's offensive chief is trying to treat the transition as business as usual, saying Wednesday that his "week has been as normal as it could be." "Quite honestly, my week for me would be a normal game week as if I hadn't taken the Texas job," Sarkisian said.


Watch a Robot Dog Learn How to Deftly Fend Off a Human

WIRED

Study hard enough, kids, and maybe one day you'll grow up to be a professional robot fighter. A few years ago, Boston Dynamics set the standard for the field by having people wielding hockey sticks try to keep Spot the quadrupedal robot from opening a door. Previously, in 2015, the far-out federal research agency Darpa hosted a challenge in which it forced clumsy humanoid robots to embarrass themselves on an obstacle course way outside the machines' league. And now, behold: The makers of the Jueying robot dog have taught it a fascinating way to fend off a human antagonizer who kicks it over or pushes it with a stick. A team of researchers from China's Zhejiang University--where the Jueying's hardware was also developed--and the University of Edinburgh didn't teach the Jueying how to recover after an assault, so much as they let the robot figure it out.


Former ESPN esports reporter Jacob Wolf joins Dot Esports

Washington Post - Technology News

Former ESPN esports journalist Jacob Wolf will be joining Dot Esports, where he began his career. The 23-year-old Wolf owns a reputation as one of the leading news breakers in the world of esports, where information is typically tightly controlled. He was also among a number of recognized esports journalists laid off by ESPN when it decided to shutter its esports section after four years as part of a broader round of layoffs announced in November. Before joining ESPN, Wolf worked at the Daily Dot and will begin a second term at Dot Esports on Monday as the site's chief reporter and investigative lead.


G2 were the kings of 'Valorant' in Europe. What happened?

Washington Post - Technology News

One theory, raised by Broomall, who coaches TSM in North America, is that the disparity between the two scenes can be explained by the regions' respective "Counter-Strike" scenes. In North America, the scene is inert, mostly discussed in the context of speculation around its apparent impending death. In Europe, however, "Counter-Strike" tournaments happen on a regular basis; a bounty of mid- and high-level organizations make it a hospitable environment for players. In North America, talented players who didn't have a shot in "Counter-Strike" made the jump to "Valorant," where they faced tons of other talented but unrecognized pros. In Europe, however, professionals had few incentives to leave the warm bosom of "Counter-Strike."