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Law Enforcement & Public Safety


How To Fool Facial Recognition Systems

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"We've developed a new attack on AI-driven facial recognition systems, which can change your photo in such a way that an AI system will recognise you as a different person, in fact as anyone you want," according to Adversa AI's official website. Adversa managed to trick facial recognition search tool PimEyes into misidentifying Vice reporter Todd Feathers as Mark Zuckerberg. Facial recognition for one-to-one identification has become an increasingly popular AI application. But facial recognition technology is not fool-proof. Adversa AI was designed to fool facial recognition algorithms by adding alterations or noise to the original image.


Pluralistic: 02 Aug 2021 – Pluralistic: Daily links from Cory Doctorow

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This work licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. That means you can use it any way you like, including commercially, provided that you attribute it to me, Cory Doctorow, and include a link to pluralistic.net.


Citizen app launches paid service to spy on your phone

Mashable

Would you pay a subscription for the neighborhood watch app Citizen? On Tuesday, the controversial mobile app which lets users report on local crime and other incidents announced a $19.99 premium service called Citizen Protect that offers 24/7 access to "highly trained safety experts." The premium Protect service, which is now available for iOS, began testing earlier this year with nearly 100,000 beta users. One new feature that particularly stands out allows the company to monitor your smartphone audio using AI-powered technology. The Citizen Protect service is designed to provide customers with a live, human safety expert on-demand.


Citizen crime app releases Protect, an on-demand subscription security feature

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

After months of testing, Citizen, the crime and neighborhood watch app, is releasing Protect, a subscription-based feature that lets users contact virtual agents for help if they feel they're in danger. According to Citizen, the feature can connect users with a Protect agent either through video, audio, or text available around the clock. The company said audio and text-only communication allows users to discreetly call for help "in difficult situations" where they might not be able to or are scared to be seen calling 911. Protect began beta testing earlier this year as the feature has been available to 100,000 users, Citizen said. The new feature comes as Citizen currently has more than 8 million users who have sent out more than billion alerts in major U.S. cities including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, Houston and the San Francisco Bay Area.


Fake It to Make It: Companies Beef Up AI Models With Synthetic Data

#artificialintelligence

Companies rely on real-world data to train artificial-intelligence models that can identify anomalies, make predictions and generate insights. To detect credit-card fraud, for example, researchers train AI models to look for specific patterns of known suspicious behavior, gleaned from troves of data. But unique, or rare, types of fraud are difficult to detect when there isn't enough data to support the algorithm's training. To get around that, companies are learning to fake it, building so-called synthetic data sets designed to augment training data. At American Express Co., machine-learning and data scientists have been experimenting with synthetic data for nearly two years in hopes of improving the company's AI-based fraud-detection models, said Dmitry Efimov, head of the company's Machine Learning Center of Excellence. The credit-card company uses an advanced form of AI to generate fake fraud patterns aimed at bolstering the real training data.


Use of Artificial Intelligence in Banking World today

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AI is evolving on fast pace. Financial organizations are already using AI technologies to identify fraud and unusual transactions, personalize customer service, help make decisions on creditworthiness, using natural language processing on text documents, and for cybersecurity and general risk management. Over the past decades, banks have been improving their methods of interacting with customers. They have tailored modern technology to the specific character of their work. As an example, in the 1960s, the first ATMs were installed, and ten years later, there were already cards for doing transactions and payment.


Grafton police use artificial intelligence for new type of policing

#artificialintelligence

This camera can scan hundreds of cars a minute, to track down wanted criminals. It is called a Flock Safety camera. Grafton Police showed us how it has worked. For example in less than 2.5 minutes, Chief Jeff Caponera found the car our TMJ4 News crew drove to the interview. A camera installed on I-43 near the Washington Street exit, captured images of our SUV, along with every other vehicle that passes this stationary camera.


Lying, corrupt, anti-American cops are running amok with AI

#artificialintelligence

Hundreds of thousands of law enforcement agents in the US have the authority to use blackbox AI to conduct unethical surveillance, generate evidence, and circumvent our Fourth Amendment protections. And there's little reason to believe anyone's going to do anything about it. The problem is that blackbox AI systems are a goldmine for startups, big tech, and politicians. And, since the general public is ignorant about what they do or how they're being used, law enforcement agencies have carte blanche to do whatever they want. Let's start with the individual officers.


'It's feasible to start a war': how dangerous are ransomware hackers?

The Guardian

They have the sort of names that only teenage boys or aspiring Bond villains would dream up (REvil, Grief, Wizard Spider, Ragnar), they base themselves in countries that do not cooperate with international law enforcement and they don't care whether they attack a hospital or a multinational corporation. Ransomware gangs are suddenly everywhere, seemingly unstoppable – and very successful. In June, meat producer JBS, which supplies over a fifth of all the beef in the US, paid a £7.8m ransom to regain access to its computer systems. The same month, the US's largest national fuel pipeline, Colonial Pipeline, paid £3.1m to ransomware hackers after they locked the company's systems, causing days of fuel shortages and paralysing the east coast. "It was the hardest decision I've made in my 39 years in the energy industry," said a deflated-looking Colonial CEO Joseph Blount in an evidence session before Congress. In July, hackers attacked software firm Kaseya, demanding £50m.


Use of Artificial Intelligence in Banking World today

#artificialintelligence

AI is evolving on fast pace. Financial organizations are already using AI technologies to identify fraud and unusual transactions, personalize customer service, help make decisions on creditworthiness, using natural language processing on text documents, and for cybersecurity and general risk management. Over the past decades, banks have been improving their methods of interacting with customers. They have tailored modern technology to the specific character of their work. As an example, in the 1960s, the first ATMs were installed, and ten years later, there were already cards for doing transactions and payment.