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Deep Learning A-Z : Hands-On Artificial Neural Networks

#artificialintelligence

Learn to create Deep Learning Algorithms in Python from two Machine Learning & Data Science experts. Artificial intelligence is growing exponentially. There is no doubt about that. Self-driving cars are clocking up millions of miles, IBM Watson is diagnosing patients better than armies of doctors and Google Deepmind's AlphaGo beat the World champion at Go - a game where intuition plays a key role. But the further AI advances, the more complex become the problems it needs to solve.


Did 'The Simpsons' Predict Yet Another Technological Marvel Before Its Time?

#artificialintelligence

Over the years, Fox's animated comedy The Simpsons has successfully predicted several real-life developments. From Donald Trump becoming the United States President to Disney purchasing 20th Century Fox, the show's writers have been correct more than a few times. Though not all their predictions have received the attention they deserve. Back in Season 5, in the episode entitled "Homer Loves Flanders," the frenemy neighbors become better acquainted with each other. At one point, Ned takes his new best friend to a baseball game.


Dataloop Drives Labeling Into the DataOps Pipeline

#artificialintelligence

Data is the fuel for machine learning, but the data needs to be accurately labeled for the machines to learn. To that end, data training startup Dataloop yesterday unveiled that it's received $11 million in Series A funding to build SaaS data pipelines that combine human supervision of the data annotation process, along with data management capabilities. Today's computer vision models are extremely powerful, and the ones based on deep learning approaches can exceed human capabilities. From self-driving cars navigating in the world to programs that can accurate diagnose diseases in MRI images, the potential uses for Ais built upon convolutional neural networks are astonishingly wide. However, there's a catch (there always is).


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

Data is the fuel for machine learning, but the data needs to be accurately labeled for the machines to learn. To that end, data training startup Dataloop yesterday unveiled that it's received $11 million in Series A funding to build SaaS data pipelines that combine human supervision of the data annotation process, along with data management capabilities. Today's computer vision models are extremely powerful, and the ones based on deep learning approaches can exceed human capabilities. From self-driving cars navigating in the world to programs that can accurate diagnose diseases in MRI images, the potential uses for Ais built upon convolutional neural networks are astonishingly wide. However, there's a catch (there always is).


MIT, TU Wien & IST Austria Brain-Based AI Self-Drives With Just a Few Neurons

#artificialintelligence

Modern AI has produced models that exceed human performance across countless tasks. Now, an international research team is suggesting AI might become even more efficient and reliable if it learns to think more like worms. In a paper recently published in Nature Machine Intelligence journal, the team from MIT CSAIL, TU Wien in Vienna, and IST Austria proposes an AI system that mimics biological models. The system was developed based on the brains of tiny animals such as threadworms and is able to control a vehicle using just a small number of artificial neurons. The researchers say the system has decisive advantages over other deep learning models because it copes much better with noisy input, and, because of its simplicity, its operations can be explained in detail -- alleviating the "black box" concerns affecting today's deep AI models. Explains TU Wien Cyber-Physical Systems head Professor Radu Grosu in a project press release: "For years, we have been investigating what we can learn from nature to improve deep learning.


Cruise to launch unmanned self-driving cars in San Francisco this year

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving cars will start rolling on the streets of San Francisco without a human on board by the end of this year, according to Cruise, a General Motors-owned autonomous vehicle company that received a permit from the California Department of Motor Vehicles this week. Cruise is now one of five companies to hold a permit to test self-driving cars in California without a person in the vehicle, along with the Alphabet-owned Waymo and several others, though dozens of companies have been permitted by the California DMV to test self-driving cars with a human operator in the vehicle. GM President Dan Ammann confirmed in blog post on Thursday that the company will rapidly deploy its autonomous vehicles in San Francisco by the end of this year, citing the potential safety and environmental benefits the technology could have for city residents. "And while it would be easier to do this in the suburbs, where driving is 30–40 times less complex, our cities are ground zero for the world's transportation crisis," Ammann wrote. "This is where accidents, pollution, congestion, and lack of accessibility collide.


Waymo Has Launched a Self-Driving Taxi Service

#artificialintelligence

The age of the driverless taxi has arrived – at least in parts of Phoenix, Arizona. Self-driving car company Waymo, owned by Google's parent company Alphabet, announced its autonomous vehicles are now available to the general public (or at least paying customers). The service is only available in a limited area for now, both because regulations in Arizona are relatively permissive and because the cars need a detailed three-dimensional map to tell them all about the road environment. Until earlier this year, the self-driving vehicles were under testing and were used in 5-10% of Waymo's rides. The service has been shut because of the pandemic, but is now back and Waymo is aiming to increase availability.


Sapcorda expands GNSS augmentation service for autonomous vehicles - GPS World

#artificialintelligence

GNSS augmentation solution targets North America and Europe with safe and precise centimeter-level accuracy performance from two geostationary satellites. Sapcorda Services GmbH is now testing its GNSS augmentation services for the L-band signal in North America and Europe. The testing lays the foundation for a Dec. 1 launch of what Sapcorda said will be the strongest, most reliable GNSS augmentation signal for safety-critical navigation in autonomous vehicles and machinery. Available in areas without GSM coverage or mobile internet signal, the new Sapcorda L-band beam solutions from two geostationary satellites provide PPP-RTK data-feed redundancy in real-time by swapping to a second data feed when internet connectivity is not available. This automated swapping significantly improves reliability for life-critical applications such as autonomous cars. "To use GNSS in mass-market safety-critical applications, manufacturers need GNSS augmentation services that provide correction data with safety-critical positioning," said Botho zu Eulenburg, CEO, Sapcorda.


This at-home science kit helps kids build their own self-driving cars

Mashable

TL;DR: Nurture your budding scientist with the Autonomous Vehicle Kit, which is on sale for $239.99 as of Oct. 16. Got a kid who loves to play with toy cars? Grab the Autonomous Vehicle Kit and help them take their interest to new heights. This kit from Twin Science will help kids learn the basics of how artificial intelligence in transportation. Through hands-on projects with step-by-step instructions, this kit will help them grow their STEM skills, problem-solving skills, and confidence early on.


GM's Cruise plans to test unmanned self-driving cars this year in San Francisco

#artificialintelligence

Cruise, a majority-owned subsidiary of General Motors, plans to begin testing unmanned autonomous vehicles by the end of this year in San Francisco. The company said Thursday it has received a permit from the California Department of Motor Vehicles to remove the human backup drivers from its self-driving cars. The state also confirmed the permit on its website. "Before the end of the year, we'll be sending cars out onto the streets of SF -- without gasoline and without anyone at the wheel," Cruise CEO Dan Ammann wrote in a Medium post. "Because safely removing the driver is the true benchmark of a self-driving car, and because burning fossil fuels is no way to build the future of transportation."