Parkinson's Disease


Tango could stave off the effects of Parkinson's disease

Daily Mail

To us as a neuroscientist and biomechanist (Lena), and a rehabilitation scientist and dancer (Madeleine), understanding the complexities of motor skill in a ballet move, or the physical language of coordination in partner dance, is an inspiring and daunting challenge. The ultimate goal is to help better design and prescribe rehabilitation to those with reduced mobility, as well as to develop robots that can physically interact with people to help with both motor assistance and motor learning. Lucas McKay, an assistant professor in Biomedical Engineering at Emory specializing in mechanisms of balance impairment in Parkinson's disease, showed that participants improved muscle activity for balance after adapted tango. That is, as they practiced their tango dancing skills, they developed motor modules that also helped them walk and balance in everyday situations.


New Parkinson's Disease Treatment: Dancing With Robots

International Business Times

To us as a neuroscientist and biomechanist (Lena), and a rehabilitation scientist and dancer (Madeleine), understanding the complexities of motor skill in a ballet move, or the physical language of coordination in partner dance, is an inspiring and daunting challenge. The ultimate goal is to help better design and prescribe rehabilitation to those with reduced mobility, as well as to develop robots that can physically interact with people to help with both motor assistance and motor learning. Lucas McKay, an assistant professor in Biomedical Engineering at Emory specializing in mechanisms of balance impairment in Parkinson's disease, showed that participants improved muscle activity for balance after adapted tango. That is, as they practiced their tango dancing skills, they developed motor modules that also helped them walk and balance in everyday situations.


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Mashable

To us as a neuroscientist and biomechanist ( Lena), and a rehabilitation scientist and dancer ( Madeleine), understanding the complexities of motor skill in a ballet move, or the physical language of coordination in partner dance, is an inspiring and daunting challenge. Adapted tango rehabilitation class improves gait and balance in people with Parkinson's disease. Lucas McKay, an assistant professor in Biomedical Engineering at Emory specializing in mechanisms of balance impairment in Parkinson's disease, showed that participants improved muscle activity for balance after adapted tango. That is, as they practiced their tango dancing skills, they developed motor modules that also helped them walk and balance in everyday situations.


Radical 'brain mesh' that could make the Matrix a reality

Daily Mail

In tests in mice, the injectable probe produced a minimal, short-lived immune response and the mesh and brain tissue merged with the probe. In tests in mice, the injectable probe produced a minimal, short-lived immune response and the mesh and brain tissue merged with the probe. Dr Charles Lieber, the co-author of the research, says that'the mesh electronics should provide unique opportunities for brain-machine interfaces for tetraplegic patients, deep brain stimulations for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and neural prosthetics in general' Dr Lieber says that most areas of neuroscience research could benefit from the technology's long-term stability and ability to record signals at the level of a single neuron. Dr Lieber also says that'the mesh electronics should provide unique opportunities for brain-machine interfaces for tetraplegic patients, deep brain stimulations for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and neural prosthetics in general.'


But Will the Algorithms Have Empathy?

#artificialintelligence

How soon will it be before smart machines perform complex, multifaceted services such as looking out for our health? Every day, we hear about smart machines with new capabilities: computers that can outplay chess masters or are capable of processing natural language to answer increasingly complex questions; new cars that alert us when the driver in front of us hits the brakes, when we drift out of our designated lanes, or when a pedestrian suddenly steps off the curb. But how soon will it be before smart machines perform complex, multifaceted services such as looking out for our health? Applying similar capabilities to detect other illness early and accurately may not be far away.


Microsoft watch eliminates hand tremors in Parkinson's

Daily Mail

The prototype device works by sending tiny vibrations into the wearer's wrist, which disrupts the feedback loop between the brain and the hand that causes the tremors. Microsoft has developed a vibrating watch (pictured) that alleviates the hand tremors of sufferers of Parkinson's disease Microsoft's Emma Watch works via a combination of motion sensors and artificial intelligence. The device works by sending tiny vibrations into the wearer's wrist, which disrupt the feedback loop between the brain and the hand that causes the tremors'Once these symptoms can be identified and measured, it's possible to develop technology and devices that help humans manage their symptoms,' a company spokesperson said during the showcase. Despite her job as a graphic designer, Ms Lawton tells Ms Zhang: 'I tend to avoid doing sketching and writing now because it's not really worth it' But after Ms Zhang gives Ms Lawton the watch, she is able to draw a neat square with relative ease, and is shown as she writes her own name'for the first time in years' Ms Lawton tells Ms Zhang: 'I tend to avoid doing sketching and writing now because it's not really worth it.


Brain cell therapy 'promising' for Parkinson's disease

BBC News

Scientists believe they have found a way to treat and perhaps reverse Parkinson's disease, by making replacement cells to mend the damaged brain. They say human brain cells can be coaxed to take over the job of the ones that are destroyed in Parkinson's. Scientists have been looking for ways to replace the damaged dopamine neurons by injecting new ones into the brain. The treatment appeared to work, reprogramming their brain cells and lessening their Parkinson's symptoms.


Meet the Guys Who Sold "Neuralink" to Elon Musk without Even Realizing It

MIT Technology Review

Starting in 2011, Mohseni, a bioengineer, and Nudo, a brain specialist, began exploring an idea for an electronic brain chip to treat traumatic brain injury. That's also been a problem for researchers developing devices that read the brains of paralyzed people and allow them to move robotic arms. The most widely employed, and sold by medical device giant Medtronic, is a "deep brain stimulator" able to stop the tremors of people with Parkinson's disease. More recently, a company called NeuroPace began selling the first "closed-loop" brain implant for epilepsy patients.


Have Scientists Discovered A Mind Control Drug? Using Dopamine To Read Thoughts, Treat Addiction And OCD

International Business Times

A study in Neuron says that in a situation where a person has to make a decision about which action to take, levels of dopamine in the brain suggest which choice will be made, and changing those dopamine levels will affect the choice. Measuring dopamine levels in the brain could tell scientists what action you are about to take. According to the Salk Institute, whose researchers were involved in the study that used brain scans on mice to discover the mind-control mechanism of dopamine, the findings suggest that playing with dopamine levels in someone's brain could help people with Parkinson's control their behavior. A similar system could be used to stop the compulsive behaviors of drug addicts and people with OCD.


Super-fast Parkinson's app will track symptoms more closely

New Scientist

A smartphone app that uses deep learning lets people with Parkinson's disease test their symptoms at home in just 4 minutes. The app could help people monitor the disease's progression more closely, and uncover how lifestyle factors may affect their symptoms. This makes it hard to track the disease progression in an individual in detail, and means that side effects of medication such as deterioration of mood can go unnoticed. Stamate added a deep learning feature so that subsequent versions of the app can distinguish between good data, like a measurement of tremors, and bad data, like the smartphone being knocked.