Parkinson's Disease


Microsoft watch eliminates hand tremors in Parkinson's

Daily Mail

The prototype device works by sending tiny vibrations into the wearer's wrist, which disrupts the feedback loop between the brain and the hand that causes the tremors. Microsoft has developed a vibrating watch (pictured) that alleviates the hand tremors of sufferers of Parkinson's disease Microsoft's Emma Watch works via a combination of motion sensors and artificial intelligence. The device works by sending tiny vibrations into the wearer's wrist, which disrupt the feedback loop between the brain and the hand that causes the tremors'Once these symptoms can be identified and measured, it's possible to develop technology and devices that help humans manage their symptoms,' a company spokesperson said during the showcase. Despite her job as a graphic designer, Ms Lawton tells Ms Zhang: 'I tend to avoid doing sketching and writing now because it's not really worth it' But after Ms Zhang gives Ms Lawton the watch, she is able to draw a neat square with relative ease, and is shown as she writes her own name'for the first time in years' Ms Lawton tells Ms Zhang: 'I tend to avoid doing sketching and writing now because it's not really worth it.


Brain cell therapy 'promising' for Parkinson's disease

BBC News

Scientists believe they have found a way to treat and perhaps reverse Parkinson's disease, by making replacement cells to mend the damaged brain. They say human brain cells can be coaxed to take over the job of the ones that are destroyed in Parkinson's. Scientists have been looking for ways to replace the damaged dopamine neurons by injecting new ones into the brain. The treatment appeared to work, reprogramming their brain cells and lessening their Parkinson's symptoms.


Meet the Guys Who Sold "Neuralink" to Elon Musk without Even Realizing It

MIT Technology Review

Starting in 2011, Mohseni, a bioengineer, and Nudo, a brain specialist, began exploring an idea for an electronic brain chip to treat traumatic brain injury. That's also been a problem for researchers developing devices that read the brains of paralyzed people and allow them to move robotic arms. The most widely employed, and sold by medical device giant Medtronic, is a "deep brain stimulator" able to stop the tremors of people with Parkinson's disease. More recently, a company called NeuroPace began selling the first "closed-loop" brain implant for epilepsy patients.


Have Scientists Discovered A Mind Control Drug? Using Dopamine To Read Thoughts, Treat Addiction And OCD

International Business Times

A study in Neuron says that in a situation where a person has to make a decision about which action to take, levels of dopamine in the brain suggest which choice will be made, and changing those dopamine levels will affect the choice. Measuring dopamine levels in the brain could tell scientists what action you are about to take. According to the Salk Institute, whose researchers were involved in the study that used brain scans on mice to discover the mind-control mechanism of dopamine, the findings suggest that playing with dopamine levels in someone's brain could help people with Parkinson's control their behavior. A similar system could be used to stop the compulsive behaviors of drug addicts and people with OCD.


Super-fast Parkinson's app will track symptoms more closely

New Scientist

A smartphone app that uses deep learning lets people with Parkinson's disease test their symptoms at home in just 4 minutes. The app could help people monitor the disease's progression more closely, and uncover how lifestyle factors may affect their symptoms. This makes it hard to track the disease progression in an individual in detail, and means that side effects of medication such as deterioration of mood can go unnoticed. Stamate added a deep learning feature so that subsequent versions of the app can distinguish between good data, like a measurement of tremors, and bad data, like the smartphone being knocked.


Experts find two mechanisms involved in making decisions

Daily Mail

Scientists have identified two distinct mechanisms in the human brain that control the balance between speed and accuracy when making decisions. The computational model showed that the brain took longer in the more difficult tests to gather the necessary information to a critical threshold and make a decision. The computational model showed that the brain took longer in the more difficult tests to gather the necessary information to a critical threshold and make a decision. 'We measured the electrical activity of groups of nerve cells within the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease, who had recently been treated with deep brain stimulation.'


It's Gee-Whiz for the Golden Years

AITopics Original Links

Researchers dreaming up such high-tech innovations to make the lives of senior citizens easier are convening this week at an unusual technology exhibition at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Woodley Park. As more baby boomers hit retirement, the potential market for such appliances will become enormous, said Russell Bodoff, executive director of tech industry coalition Center for Aging Services Technologies. Home Free Inc. offers monitoring services for senior citizens, tracking patients via watches or pendants with built-in wireless technology. Guido the walker, developed by Carnegie Mellon University, uses similar wireless technology to help Grandma find her way through large buildings -- or to help the walker find Grandma; she can summon it by remote control.


Quality of Life Technology Center - Carnegie Mellon University

AITopics Original Links

Alex Hauptmann received funding from the CMU Disruptive Health Technology Institute for a computerized coach for proper inhaler use. Fernando De La Torre received funding from the CMU Disruptive Health Technology Institute to develop techniques for detecting symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. Jim Osborn received funding for a "Successful Aging" project from CMU's Metro21 initiative. Kris Kitani was named a Systems Scientist in the CMU Robotics Institute and is working with Dan Siewiorek, Asim Smailagic and Jim Osborn on computer vision-assisted life logging.


Simple breath test can detect cancer and 16 other diseases

#artificialintelligence

The team tested breath samples from more than 1,400 patients and identified 13 chemicals found in eight types of cancers, Crohn's disease, Parkinson's disease, pulmonary hypertension and other diseases. To pick up the presence and ratio of the chemicals, the team built an "artificially intelligent nanoarray" called the Na-Nose. The data is then analyzed by an artificial intelligence system, which takes into account age, gender and other factors, picking out the right affliction 86 percent of the time. "For example, in the case of lung cancer we can increase the survival rate from 10 to 70 percent by early diagnosis," Haick said in a video (above).


Simple breath test can detect cancer and 16 other diseases

Engadget

They developed a device that uses nanoparticles to identify 17 different diseases, including lung cancer and Parkinson's disease, from just a single breath. While the machine isn't accurate enough yet for real-life clinical diagnoses, it shows high promise as a quick, non-invasive test that could catch diseases in their early stages The team tested breath samples from more than 1,400 patients and identified 13 chemicals found in eight types of cancers, Crohn's disease, Parkinson's disease, pulmonary hypertension and other diseases. "These odor signatures are what enables us to identify the diseases using the technology that we developed," says research lead Prof. Hossam Haick. "For example, in the case of lung cancer we can increase the survival rate from 10 to 70 percent by early diagnosis," Haick said in a video (above).