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Dementia


IoT + AI = Divine Healthcare Pair for helping Elderly

#artificialintelligence

As we age our bodies becomes a host to several diseases and inabilities. It's like the reverse cycle of a young-one growing up that executes in the opposite direction. Here's how AI and IoT in healthcare can help dementia patients. With age, senior people tend to lose their ability to walk correctly, hear well, speak sharply, and they get blurred vision. Dementia is the dysfunction of several mental conditions like memory loss, decision making, or thinking potential.


IoT + AI = Divine Healthcare Pair for helping Elderly

#artificialintelligence

As we age our bodies becomes a host to several diseases and inabilities. It's like the reverse cycle of a young-one growing up that executes in the opposite direction. Here's how AI and IoT in healthcare can help dementia patients. With age, senior people tend to lose their ability to walk correctly, hear well, speak sharply, and they get blurred vision. Dementia is the dysfunction of several mental conditions like memory loss, decision making, or thinking potential.


Nigerian-Irish teens win international prize with app that helps people with dementia

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A group of Nigerian girls living in Ireland have won an international tech competition with an app that helps people with dementia. Three teens took first place in Technovation Girls, a contest challenging young women and families to use technology to address real-world problems. Their app, Memory Haven, was on one of 16 finalists at the Technovation World Summit, taking the senior girl's division and being named People's Choice. In all, nearly 2,000 entrants from more than 60 countries entered the competition. Memory Haven has a half-dozen features targeting memory loss and speech and recognition problems - all of which are key issues faced by people with dementia.


Ethically Collecting Conversations With People that have Cognitive Impairments

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This is a streamlined abridgement of my paper with Pierre Albert, published at LREC's Workshop on Legal and Ethical Issues in Human Language Technologies 2020. If you use any of this guide in your research, please do cite our paper titled "Ethically Collecting Multi-Modal Spontaneous Conversations with People that have Cognitive Impairments": Getting ethical approval to collect a crucial corpus took me over a year to complete. This was relatively fresh ground to tread, but I hope other researchers want to work on the accessibility of voice assistants for people with all varieties of cognitive impairments. This practical guide aims to help future researchers, like me, collect these valuable datasets quickly without compromising any ethical considerations or data security. Over a year ago now, I decided that I wanted to work to make voice assistants (Siri, Alexa, etc…) more accessible for people with dementia. To begin this project, I (with two of my supervisors) first detailed some of the critical challenges that need to be tackled if we are to make progress towards this goal.


Artificial intelligence: Elon Musk puts computer chips in animal brains - Daily Times

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Elon Musk, the founder of the American company Tesla and SpaceX, demonstrated how to connect a computer chip made by his new company'Neuralink' to the animal brain. Elon Musk's company, Neuralink, has developed a chip in just four years, which is being hailed as the beginning of a new era in the world of medicine and technology. Musk, however, has expressed fears in the past that artificial intelligence will overtake the human mind in the future, and has apparently acknowledged the natural faculties of the human mind. Neuralink aims to implant wireless brain-computer interfaces that include thousands of electrodes in the most complex human organ to help cure neurological conditions like Alzheimer's, dementia and spinal cord injuries and ultimately fuse humankind with artificial intelligence. "An implantable device can actually solve these problems," Musk said on a webcast Friday, mentioning ailments such as memory loss, hearing loss, depression and insomnia.


The Ethics Of AI And Death - Big Easy Magazine

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AI can now accurately predict death, but is that a prediction we want to hear? In almost every industry, artificial intelligence (AI) is on the fast track to outpacing human endeavor. Machine learning technologies are already better than the average person at gaming, creating content and even building AI, and it appears they are only going from strength to strength. As a result of their developing intelligence, the most common question AI critics have been asking is whether it's ethical to be putting ourselves out of a job. YouTube video essayist CGP Grey put it best when he said that, by investing in AI development, we are steaming ahead towards a market in which "humans need not apply" without adequately preparing the population for that scenario.


Good sense of smell may indicate lower risk of dementia in older adults: study

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. "Stop and smell the roses" may actually be important when it comes to detecting your risk for dementia and getting early treatment for the condition, according to a new study. A study out of the University of California San Francisco found that older Americans who can identify odors like roses, lemons, onions, paint-thinner, and turpentine may have half the risk of developing dementia compared to those with significant sensory loss, according to researchers performing the study. "The olfactory bulb, which is critical for smell, is affected fairly early on in the course of the disease," said first author Willa Brenowitz, Ph.D., of the UCSF Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Weill Institute for Neurosciences, in a statement.



The surprising future of fintech

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Thanks to open banking, fintech early adopters likely already have accounts that round up transactions to boost savings or connect to third-party tools for loan applications, budget management and more. But the new wave of fintech startups are proving there's much more that can be done using open banking, the two-year-old mandate from UK regulators that required banks to easily allow their customers to share their data with third parties such as apps. "Open banking offers people the chance to get personalised, tailored support to help them manage their money by allowing regulated companies to securely analyse their bank data," says Lubaina Manji, senior programme manager at Nesta Challenges, one of the organisations behind the Open Up 2020 Challenge, alongside the Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE). "It's enabled the creation of new services and tools to help people with every aspect of money management – from budgeting to investing, and much, much more, all in a safe and secure way." And some of the innovations from finalists in the Open Up 2020 Challenge have surprised with their ingenuity and customer focus, she says, citing Sustainably's round-up tool for automated charity donations, and Kalgera's neuroscience-informed AI to help spot fraud targeting people with dementia – two projects that highlight the purpose-driven idea behind open banking and the aim to get financial support to show who need it the most.


App promises to improve pain management in dementia patients

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University of Alberta computing scientists are developing an app to aid health-care staff to assess and manage pain in patients suffering from dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases. "The challenge with understanding pain in patients with dementia is that the expressions of pain in these individuals are often mistaken for psychiatric problems," said Eleni Stroulia, professor in the Department of Computing Science and co-lead on the project. "So we asked, how can we use technology to better understand the pain of people with dementia?" Along with Stroulia, the project is led by Thomas Hadjistavropoulos at the University of Regina as part of AGE-WELL, one of Canada's Networks of Centres of Excellence. The app will serve to digitize a pen-and-paper observational checklist that past research has shown helps health-care workers such as nurses when assessing pain in their patients suffering from dementia.