Autism


The questionable ethics of treating autistic children with robots

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One day in the spring of 2017, at the department of clinical psychology at Babes-Bolyai University, Romania, a robot stood on a table facing a child. The robot was a half-metre tall humanoid in brightly coloured plastic, like a toy. Its round eyes lit up as it spoke, its voice childlike. Across the table sat a young boy in a Pokémon T-shirt, playing a game where he had to figure out which object the lit-up eyes are looking at. Over the table-top between the pair was a horizontal display, showing two digital items, a flower and a tree.


AI Could Make Detecting Autism Easier

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Martin Styner's son Max was 6 by the time clinicians diagnosed him with autism. The previous year, Max's kindergarten teacher had noticed some behavioral signs. For example, the little boy would immerse himself in books so completely that he shut out what was going on around him. But it wasn't until Max started to ignore his teacher that his parents enlisted the help of a child psychologist to evaluate him. Max is at the mild end of the spectrum.


Personalized "deep learning" equips robots for autism therapy

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Children with autism spectrum conditions often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them -- distinguishing a happy face from a fearful face, for instance. To remedy this, some therapists use a kid-friendly robot to demonstrate those emotions and to engage the children in imitating the emotions and responding to them in appropriate ways. This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent, the scientists report June 27 in Science Robotics.


IBM Watson Takes On Autism

Forbes Technology

IBM Watson burst onto the world stage in 2011 when it participated in the trivia-based game show Jeopardy!. The supercomputer beat out two former champions to claim a victory for "artificial intelligence". Since then, Watson has embarked on a number of challenges across a variety of domains, from identifying the best cancer treatments to improving weather forecasting. For its latest endeavor, Watson is looking to improve the quality of life for individuals with autism and other cognitive disorders. Autism refers to a group of complex disorders of brain development characterized by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and possible repetitive behaviors.


Deep Learning Equips Robots to Help Autistic Children With Therapy

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Children who have autism often find it challenging to ascertain the emotional state of people surrounding them. For example, they have trouble differentiating between a scared and a happy face. In order to resolve this concerning issue, some therapists have begun employing children-friendly robots who demonstrate these emotions and help them imitate these feelings so that they are then able to respond to them appropriately. These robots are designed in a way that they engage autistic kids in a personalized way. However, this therapy can work only if a robot can accurately comprehend a child's behavior and analyze his/her level of focus and excitement during the course of therapy.


Scientists develop "deep learning" robots to empower autistic children - The Financial Express

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MIT scientists have developed a new type of "deep learning" network that can aid robots gauge the quality of their interactions with children having autism spectrum conditions by using data unique to each child. Autism spectrum disorder is a condition related to brain development that impacts how a person perceives and socializes with others, causing problems in social interaction and communication. The term "spectrum" in autism spectrum disorder refers to the wide range of symptoms and severity. Armed with personalised "deep learning", the child-friendly robot NAO can smoothly estimate the engagement and interest of each autistic child, using data unique to that particular individual, based on a study performed on 35 autistic children. The new development can make their lives easier.


Robotic AI Helping Autistic Kids Read Emotions

#artificialintelligence

Kids with autistic conditions sometimes work with robots to help them better distinguish emotions. Now, scientists at MIT are using artificial intelligence to make sure these robots understand the children they're working with. When therapists use robots for kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), they do so to demonstrate how to better understand emotions and socialize in a more general population. A study in 2012 showed several "potential advantages to using interactive robots" with ASD children. Robots like Milo or NAO can walk, talk and even mimic human facial expressions.


Personalized "Deep Learning" equips Robots for Autism Therapy

#artificialintelligence

Children with autism spectrum conditions often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them . To remedy this, some therapists use a kid-friendly robot to demonstrate those emotions and to engage the children in imitating the emotions and responding to them in appropriate ways. This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning "EngageME" that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent.


Personalized 'deep learning' equips robots for autism therapy: Machine learning network offers personalized estimates of children's behavior

#artificialintelligence

This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent, the scientists report June 27 in Science Robotics. It can be challenging for human observers to reach high levels of agreement about a child's engagement and behavior. Their correlation scores are usually between 50 and 55 percent.


Personalized "deep learning" equips robots for autism therapy

MIT News

Children with autism spectrum conditions often have trouble recognizing the emotional states of people around them -- distinguishing a happy face from a fearful face, for instance. To remedy this, some therapists use a kid-friendly robot to demonstrate those emotions and to engage the children in imitating the emotions and responding to them in appropriate ways. This type of therapy works best, however, if the robot can smoothly interpret the child's own behavior -- whether he or she is interested and excited or paying attention -- during the therapy. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have now developed a type of personalized machine learning that helps robots estimate the engagement and interest of each child during these interactions, using data that are unique to that child. Armed with this personalized "deep learning" network, the robots' perception of the children's responses agreed with assessments by human experts, with a correlation score of 60 percent, the scientists report June 27 in Science Robotics.