Nephrology


Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells: Robotic approach could accelerate regenerative medicine research and drug discovery

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The advance promises to greatly expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery, according to Benjamin Freedman, assistant professor of medicine, Division of Nephrology, at the UW School of Medicine, who led the research effort. "This is a new'secret weapon' in our fight against disease,' said Freedman, who is a scientist at the UW Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, as well as at the Kidney Research Institute, a collaboration between the Northwest Kidney Centers and UW Medicine. A report describing the new technique will be published online May 17 in the journal Cell Stem Cell. The lead authors were research scientists Stefan Czerniecki, and Nelly Cruz from the Freedman lab, and Dr. Jennifer Harder, assistant professor of internal medicine, Division of Nephrology at the University of Michigan School of Medicine, where she is a kidney disease specialist. The traditional way to grow cells for biomedical research, Freeman explained, is to culture them as flat, two-dimensional sheets, which are overly simplistic.


We Might Be Able to Grow Human Organs Inside of Animals. Should We?

Slate

This story was originally published by Undark and has been republished here with permission. In the United States, the clock is ticking for more than 114,700 adults and children waiting for a donated kidney or other lifesaving organ, and each day, nearly 20 of them die. Researchers are devising a new way to grow human organs inside other animals, but the method raises potentially thorny ethical issues. Other conceivable futuristic techniques sound like dystopian science fiction. As we envision an era of regenerative medicine decades from now, how far is society willing to go to solve the organ shortage crisis?


Valid Inference for $L_2$-Boosting

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We review several recently proposed post-selection inference frameworks and assess their transferability to the component-wise functional gradient descent algorithm (CFGD) under normality assumption for model errors, also known as $L_2$-Boosting. The CFGD is one of the most versatile toolboxes to analyze data, as it scales well to high-dimensional data sets, allows for a very flexible definition of additive regression models and incorporates inbuilt variable selection. %After addressing several issues associated with Due to the iterative nature, which can repeatedly select the same component to update, an inference framework for component-wise boosting algorithms requires adaptations of existing approaches; we propose tests and confidence intervals for linear, grouped and penalized additive model components estimated using the $L_2$-boosting selection process. We apply our framework to the prostate cancer data set and investigate the properties of our concepts in simulation studies. %The most general and promising selective inference framework for $L_2$-Boosting as well as for more general gradient-descent boosting algorithms is an sampling approach which constitutes an adoption of the recently proposed method by Yang et al. (2016).



Artificial intelligence can diagnose prostate cancer as well as a pathologist Science

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The key to that is a sharper focus on patient outcomes – measuring what works, and doesn't work, in treating patients from one clinic, region and member-state to another. For that, we need more experts – in industry, policy and academia – who help this effort grow across the EU, from one capital to another. Stakeholder groups need mobilising, and interconnecting, across Europe. The old silos in healthcare across Europe need to be dismantled.


Treatment for enlarged prostate uses a robot and a jet of water

ZDNet

Procept BioRobotics, a Silicon Valley-based surgical robotics company, recently raised nearly $120 million in private equity to commercialize a treatment for a prevalent prostate condition known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH, also known as enlarged prostate, affects around half of men age 60 or older and 90 percent of men age 85 or older. Founded in 1999, Procept has pioneered the first commercially available autonomous tissue removal robot to treat BPH. The company's AQUABEAM system uses autonomous robotics and advanced imaging to deliver a heat-free waterjet that removes enlarged prostate tissue. The company has presented clinical research suggesting its method carries less risk of side effects than the current surgical gold-standard, known as TURP.


Google's DeepMind wants AI to spot kidney injuries

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Google subsidiary DeepMind announced today that it's working with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to use machine learning in an attempt to predict when patients will deteriorate during a hospital stay.



AI mines EHR data to predict diabetic patients at risk for kidney damage, study finds

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Artificial intelligence start-up Medial EarlySign in a new study has shown how the combination of AI and EHR data can facilitate early detection and treatment of kidney problems and can help slow down – or even prevent – progression to end-stage renal disease.


AI mines EHR data to predict diabetic patients at risk for kidney damage, study finds

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence start-up Medial EarlySign in a new study has shown how the combination of AI and EHR data can facilitate early detection and treatment of kidney problems and can help slow down – or even prevent – progression to end-stage renal disease.