Internal Medicine


Artificial intelligence, automation and the future of nursing Canadian Nurse

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Picture this: a patient walks into the emergency department and sits in front of the "triage nurse" -- a computer that uses advanced algorithms to ask questions based on the patient's answers. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are testing robotic decision supports that schedule nursing tasks and assign rooms to patients. TAVIE uses pre-recorded videos of a nurse to coach patients to manage their health condition and make behaviour changes. Ryan Chan, an emergency nurse and a master's student, is working with Booth and his research team as they develop an online computer game to teach electronic medication administration to nursing students.


How to Apply Artificial Intelligence to the HIV/AIDS Pandemic - ExtremeTech

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But the AI's work isn't done yet. Comparing the change in genetic code with infection rates and virulence factors could give us a better model for working toward a vaccine for this insufferable virus. And if we finally managed to program an AI that would tell us how it arrives at its conclusions, that would be a powerful collaboration indeed. Imagine an AI that evolves with the virus it tracks.


Artificial intelligence: five ways it can change our lives for the better - Inbenta

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The Center on Artificial Intelligence for Social Solutions (CAISS) has developed a tool which identifies peer leaders within Los Angeles' homeless community to spread awareness about HIV prevention. The chatbots use natural language processing on Facebook Messenger. In addition, the CC-Cruiser will be able to utilize big data by pooling worldwide cases to improve the AI further. Inbenta is a leader in natural language processing and artificial intelligence for customer support, e-commerce and conversational chatbots, providing an easy-to-deploy solution that improves customer satisfaction, reduces support costs, and increases revenue.


Scientists unveil CRISPR-based diagnostic platform

MIT News

A team of scientists from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has adapted a CRISPR protein that targets RNA (rather than DNA), for use as a rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive diagnostic tool with the potential to transform research and global public health. In a study published today in Science, Broad Institute members Feng Zhang, Jim Collins, Deb Hung, Aviv Regev, and Pardis Sabeti describe how this RNA-targeting CRISPR enzyme was harnessed as a highly sensitive detector -- able to indicate the presence of as little as a single molecule of a target RNA or DNA. In their paper and patent filing, the team described a wide range of biotechnological applications for the system, including harnessing RNA cleavage and collateral activity for basic research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. "We can now effectively and readily make sensors for any nucleic acid, which is incredibly powerful when you think of diagnostics and research applications," says Collins, the Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering and Science at MIT and core faculty member at the Wyss Institute.


Deep learning algorithm could aid drug development Stanford News

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Vijay Pande, professor of chemistry at Stanford University, and his students thought that a fairly new kind of deep learning, called one-shot learning, that requires only a small number of data points might be a solution to that low-data problem. Stanford chemistry Professor Vijay Pande and his students see a future for machine learning in the early stages of drug development. "We're trying to use machine learning, especially deep learning, for the early stage of drug design," said Pande. However, they'd had success in the past with machine learning methods requiring only hundreds of data points, and they had data available to test the one-shot approach.


Artificial intelligence: five ways it can change our lives for the better – Inbenta

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The Center on Artificial Intelligence for Social Solutions (CAISS) has developed a tool which identifies peer leaders within Los Angeles' homeless community to spread awareness about HIV prevention. Facebook is now using artificial intelligence to identify users who could be in danger of harming themselves. The chatbot is based on Facebook Messenger and asks the user a series of questions, utilizing natural language processing to determine which application refugees need to fill out. Inbenta is a leader in natural language processing and artificial intelligence for customer support, e-commerce and conversational chatbots, providing an easy-to-deploy solution that improves customer satisfaction, reduces support costs, and increases revenue.


How Zocdoc's New Machine Learning Search Engine Makes Medicine More Human

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And, wait, are internists doctors who specialize in internal medicine - or just their interns? But the complexities of medical jargon can make an already complicated U.S. health system even more convoluted for millions of people seeking care. Click here to subscribe to Brainstorm Health Daily, our brand new newsletter about health innovations. This essay appears in today's edition of the Fortune Brainstorm Health Daily.


New technology offers fast peptide synthesis

MIT News

To help speed up the manufacturing process, MIT researchers have designed a machine that can rapidly produce large quantities of customized peptides. Their new tabletop machine can form links between amino acids, the buildings blocks of proteins, in about 37 seconds, and it takes less than an hour to generate complete peptide molecules containing up to 60 amino acids. This technology could help researchers rapidly generate new peptide drugs to test on a variety of diseases, and it also raises the possibility of easily producing customized cancer vaccines for individual patients. "In my view, this approach opens up the field to the generation of peptide libraries that enable more complete structure-activity relationships of bioactive peptides in a matter of days, as well as extending this chemical approach to the synthesis of small proteins and protein domains," says Paul Alewood, a research group leader in chemistry and structural biology at the University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience.


8 innovations helping homeless populations around the world

Mashable

From a winter coat that takes contactless donations in Amsterdam to commercial shower trailers that offer hygiene and dignity in San Francisco, these eight inventions think outside the box when it comes to the issue of homelessness. Launched in June 2014, Lava Mae is a San Francisco-based nonprofit offering mobile showers and sanitation to people experiencing homelessness. The Helping Heart jacket is a prototype that takes contactless donations -- all you need to do is hover your smart credit card over the front pocket to help someone in need. Through artificial intelligence, the algorithm (called PSINET) helps organizations identify the best person in a given homeless community to spread HIV prevention information among young people.


Reality Checkup: Medical Artificial Intelligence Still a Hard Sell in the Clinic

AITopics Original Links

As head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Clinical Decision Making Group, which works to apply artificial intelligence (AI) to medicine, Szolovits knew that intelligent systems could optimize care by working together better to eliminate errors as well as avoid repetition of medical tests. Although it made inroads via various diagnostic programs such as INTERNIST and MYCIN, intelligent technologies did not revolutionize clinical care by saving lives, money and time. Researchers taught the software to recognize endocarditis by using information from medical records of patients once suspected of having the condition. By helping doctors keep track of patients' tests, make diagnoses and determine treatments, intelligent technologies could become invaluable in making health care more efficient.