Internal Medicine


What Artificial Intelligence Can Really Teach Us – Breathe Publication

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Much has been made about the rise of artificial intelligence (A.I.) and the effects it has on our society. So far, lately with its explosion especially throughout the last 5 years -- it has been used a political weapon designed to really scare peers, constituents and even go so far as to generate animosity, fear and ignorance. A.I. is real and will continue to grow as it moves to harness and leverage its own power in numerous industries. We are facing it every single day in our lives within the current smartphone era. The most notable A.I. interaction the mass market had faced?


The Key to Reducing Doctors' Misdiagnoses

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"Knowledge from systematically analyzing missed opportunities in correct or timely diagnosis will inform improvements and create a learning health system for diagnosis," Dr. Singh says. The network, known as Pride, short for Primary Care Research in Diagnostic Errors, plans to identify, analyze and classify diagnostic errors and delays with the help of electronic medical records, to develop and share interventions that can overcome diagnostic errors and delays, especially in primary care. It also plans to help doctors avoid ordering unnecessary and wasteful tests by developing "principles of conservative diagnosis," says Gordon Schiff, associate director of Brigham and Women's division of general internal medicine and quality and safety director at Harvard Medical School's Center for Primary Care. In response, the project plans to develop and test "loop-closing" tools for electronically tracking doctors' recommendations of tests and procedures that aren't carried out.


AI Research Is in Desperate Need of an Ethical Watchdog

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Stanford's review board approved Kosinski and Wang's study. "The vast, vast, vast majority of what we call'big data' research does not fall under the purview of federal regulations," says Metcalf. Take a recent example: Last month, researchers affiliated with Stony Brook University and several major internet companies released a free app, a machine learning algorithm that guesses ethnicity and nationality from a name to about 80 percent accuracy. The group also went through an ethics review at the company that provided training list of names, although Metcalf says that an evaluation at a private company is the "weakest level of review that they could do."


ai-research-is-in-desperate-need-of-an-ethical-watchdog

WIRED

Stanford's review board approved Kosinski and Wang's study. "The vast, vast, vast majority of what we call'big data' research does not fall under the purview of federal regulations," says Metcalf. Take a recent example: Last month, researchers affiliated with Stony Brook University and several major internet companies released a free app, a machine learning algorithm that guesses ethnicity and nationality from a name to about 80 percent accuracy. The group also went through an ethics review at the company that provided training list of names, although Metcalf says that an evaluation at a private company is the "weakest level of review that they could do."


Africa Leads the World on Drone Delivery: Flights to Begin in Tanzania in 2018

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Zipline, a pioneering drone startup that began delivering blood packs to Rwanda's remote hospitals in October 2016, today announced a major expansion into Tanzania. In early 2018 the company will begin flying its delivery drones to more than 1000 health care facilities around Tanzania, bringing urgently needed medicines and supplies to big hospitals and tiny rural clinics alike. He ticks off the hard parts of operating an automated, drone-delivery system at national scale: making sure all regulatory issues are resolved; finding and training a local team to operate the distribution centers; spreading word to doctors and health care workers about the service; and communicating with people in towns and villages who see the drones whizzing overhead. In Rwanda, Zipline has flown 1,400 delivery flights since service began in October 2016.


Zipline Launches Medical Supply Drone Deliveries in Tanzania

WIRED

Desperate, the doctors called a distribution center near Kigali, where clinic workers and a flight crew loaded a series of small, unmanned aircraft with the needed supplies and launched them into the sky. The Tanzanian government wants to make as many as 2,000 daily deliveries from four distribution centers serving an area roughly the size of Texas and Louisiana. Each can carry 3 pounds of cargo (one unit of blood weighs roughly 1.2 pounds), and the batteries can make a round trip of 100 miles. Zipline makes a habit of recruiting and training local engineers, health workers, and flight operators.


Artificial intelligence, automation and the future of nursing Canadian Nurse

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Picture this: a patient walks into the emergency department and sits in front of the "triage nurse" -- a computer that uses advanced algorithms to ask questions based on the patient's answers. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are testing robotic decision supports that schedule nursing tasks and assign rooms to patients. TAVIE uses pre-recorded videos of a nurse to coach patients to manage their health condition and make behaviour changes. Ryan Chan, an emergency nurse and a master's student, is working with Booth and his research team as they develop an online computer game to teach electronic medication administration to nursing students.


How to Apply Artificial Intelligence to the HIV/AIDS Pandemic - ExtremeTech

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But the AI's work isn't done yet. Comparing the change in genetic code with infection rates and virulence factors could give us a better model for working toward a vaccine for this insufferable virus. And if we finally managed to program an AI that would tell us how it arrives at its conclusions, that would be a powerful collaboration indeed. Imagine an AI that evolves with the virus it tracks.


Artificial intelligence: five ways it can change our lives for the better - Inbenta

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The Center on Artificial Intelligence for Social Solutions (CAISS) has developed a tool which identifies peer leaders within Los Angeles' homeless community to spread awareness about HIV prevention. The chatbots use natural language processing on Facebook Messenger. In addition, the CC-Cruiser will be able to utilize big data by pooling worldwide cases to improve the AI further. Inbenta is a leader in natural language processing and artificial intelligence for customer support, e-commerce and conversational chatbots, providing an easy-to-deploy solution that improves customer satisfaction, reduces support costs, and increases revenue.


Scientists unveil CRISPR-based diagnostic platform

MIT News

A team of scientists from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has adapted a CRISPR protein that targets RNA (rather than DNA), for use as a rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive diagnostic tool with the potential to transform research and global public health. In a study published today in Science, Broad Institute members Feng Zhang, Jim Collins, Deb Hung, Aviv Regev, and Pardis Sabeti describe how this RNA-targeting CRISPR enzyme was harnessed as a highly sensitive detector -- able to indicate the presence of as little as a single molecule of a target RNA or DNA. Co-first authors Omar Abudayyeh and Jonathan Gootenberg, graduate students at MIT and Harvard, respectively, dubbed the new tool SHERLOCK (Specific High-sensitivity Enzymatic Reporter unLOCKing); this technology could one day be used to respond to viral and bacterial outbreaks, monitor antibiotic resistance, and detect cancer. The scientists demonstrate the method's versatility on a range of applications, including: Because the tool can be designed for use as a paper-based test that does not require refrigeration, the researchers say it is well-suited for fast deployment and widespread use inside and outside of traditional settings -- such as at a field hospital during an outbreak, or a rural clinic with limited access to advanced equipment. "It's exciting that the Cas13a enzyme, which was originally identified in our collaboration with Eugene Koonin to study the basic biology of bacterial immunity, can be harnessed to achieve such extraordinary sensitivity, which will be powerful for both science and clinical medicine," says Feng Zhang, core institute member of the Broad Institute, an investigator at the McGovern Institute, and the James and Patricia Poitras '63 Professor in Neuroscience and associate professor in the departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering at MIT.