Immunology


What Artificial Intelligence Can Really Teach Us – Breathe Publication

#artificialintelligence

Much has been made about the rise of artificial intelligence (A.I.) and the effects it has on our society. So far, lately with its explosion especially throughout the last 5 years -- it has been used a political weapon designed to really scare peers, constituents and even go so far as to generate animosity, fear and ignorance. A.I. is real and will continue to grow as it moves to harness and leverage its own power in numerous industries. We are facing it every single day in our lives within the current smartphone era. The most notable A.I. interaction the mass market had faced?


War in Yemen: In a Devastated Country, One City Is Thriving

Der Spiegel International

No, cholera isn't the worst problem here," says the hospital director. The fatal epidemic spreading across Yemen in the last eight months, which has infected around 800,000 people and claimed over 2,000 lives, "is only the third or fourth most common cause of death here in Marib," says Dr. Mohammed al-Qubati. "Most deaths are caused by landmines." Marib's desert valley, located 172 kilometers (107 miles) east of the capital Sanaa, served for months as the frontline of some of the civil war's fiercest fighting. Starting in 2015, the attacking Houthi militants began laying tens of thousands of land mines on roads, in fields and in gardens.


AI-Powered Microscope Counts Malaria Parasites in Blood Samples

#artificialintelligence

Today, a Chinese manufacturer and a venture backed by Bill Gates will announce plans to commercialize a microscope that uses deep learning algorithms to automatically identify and count malaria parasites in a blood smear within 20 minutes. AI-powered microscopes could speed up diagnosis and standardize detection of malaria at a time when the mosquito-borne disease kills almost half a million people per year. An experimental version of the AI-powered microscope has already shown that it can detect malaria parasites well enough to meet the highest World Health Organization microscopy standard, known as competence level 1. That rating means that it performs on par with well-trained microscopists, although the researchers note that some expert microscopists can still outperform the automated system. That previous research, presented at the International Conference on Computer Vision [pdf] in October, has inspired the Global Good Fund--a partnership between the company Intellectual Ventures and Bill Gates--and a Chinese microscope manufacturer called Motic to take the next big commercialization step.


Forget killer robots - it's humans you should be worrying about instead

#artificialintelligence

When it comes to understanding artificial intelligence, is science fiction just a pesky distraction from the real dangers out there? Microsoft's authority on all things AI seems to think so, reports Jihee Junn. "With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon," declared Elon Musk back in 2014. "In all those stories where there's the guy with the pentagram and the holy water, it's like – yeah, he's sure he can control the demon. Over the years, the Tesla and SpaceX chief executive has regularly come out to express his concerns over the future of AI.


bringing-machine-learning-to-last-mile-health-challenges.html?utm_content=buffer6c127&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

@machinelearnbot

A new microscope will use image recognition software and machine learning technology to identify and count malaria parasites in a blood smear. The EasyScan GO, announced at MEDICA, the medical industry's leading trade fair, is the result of a partnership between the Global Good Fund, a Seattle-based group funded by philanthropist Bill Gates, and Motic, a China-based company that specializes in manufacturing microscopes. Field tests have demonstrated that the machine learning algorithm is as reliable as an expert microscopist in fighting the spread of drug resistant malaria. EasyScan GO is the latest example of Global Good's partnering to bring emerging technologies to health systems in low resource settings. Based at the invention company Intellectual Ventures, Global Good is focused on developing and deploying technologies for the poorest parts of the world.


AI-Powered Microscope Counts Malaria Parasites in Blood Samples

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Today, a Chinese manufacturer and a venture backed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will announce plans to commercialize a microscope that uses deep learning algorithms to automatically identify and count malaria parasites in a blood smear within 20 minutes. AI-powered microscopes could speed up diagnosis and standardize detection of malaria at a time when the mosquito-borne disease kills almost half a million people per year. An experimental version of the AI-powered microscope has already shown that it can detect malaria parasites well enough to meet the highest World Health Organization microscopy standard, known as competence level 1. That rating means that it performs on par with well-trained microscopists, although the researchers note that some expert microscopists can still outperform the automated system. That previous research, presented at the International Conference on Computer Vision [pdf] in October, has inspired the Global Good Fund--a partnership between the company Intellectual Ventures and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation--and a Chinese microscope manufacturer called Motic to take the next big commercialization step.


Zombie fungal parasites invade ants through their muscles

Daily Mail

The idea of a fungal parasite that infects ants to turn them into zombies by controling their behaviour may sound like an idea from a science fiction blockbuster. But the terrifying behaviour happens in reality, and a new study has shed light on the gruesome phenomenon. Scientists found that the parasite controls the ant through its muscles, without having to infect its brain. Researchers describe this behaviour as'like a puppeteer pulling the strings to make a marionette move.' The idea of a zombie fungal parasite that infects ants to control their behaviour may sound like an idea from a science fiction blockbuster.


ARM CEO: Tech Industry Must Build an Immune System to Prevent a Cybercrime Pandemic

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Tech security today is bad, and as people bring more and more connected tech gadgets into their homes, the risks are increasing dramatically. That's why it is time for the tech industry to step up and take responsibility for protecting the devices they make, and the people that use them. This was the message delivered by ARM CEO Simon Segars to ARM developers attending the annual ARM TechCon in Santa Clara, Calif., this week. The theme of security permeated the event, with ARM announcing its Platform Security Architecture, a set of architecture specifications and open source firmware aimed for use in the IoT, along with a programmable security core. But Segars and other speakers made it clear that this concern about security wasn't just about what ARM is doing.


News at a glance

Science

In science news around the world, a deadly plague epidemic spreads through Madagascar, Japan's economy ministry announces a successful first test of seafloor mining for metallic ore deposits near hydrothermal vents, the World Health Organization releases a new strategy for fighting cholera, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency moves to roll back limits on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. Also, economist Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago in Illinois wins the Nobel economics prize for his study of irrational human economic behavior, scientists discover evidence of rice domestication in South America, and a Carnegie Mellon University roboticist describes how his robotic snakes combed through rubble of the 19 September earthquake in Mexico.


The world is definitely going to end — just probably not Saturday

USATODAY

Musk worries AI could start World World III and Hawking worries "the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race." "Once humans develop artificial intelligence, it will take off on its own and redesign itself at an ever-increasing rate," Hawking told the BBC. "I was a member of the NASA Advisory Council on Planetary Defense which studied ways for NASA to defend the planet from asteroids and comets," NASA aerospace engineer Brian Wilcox told the BBC. "I came to the conclusion during that study that the supervolcano threat is substantially greater than the asteroid or comet threat."