Surgery


AI Is Disrupting Everything And These 3 Industries Are Next - Dataconomy

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Using typically available data from operating rooms, Sentient partnered with MIT to predict the onset of sepsis–the leading killer in the ICU–with a success rate above 90%, giving ICU doctors and nurses the ability to act quickly to prevent this killer. Finance has used AI algorithms for a long time to compute credit scores and identify fraud, and now we are again seeing chatbot-esque approaches, this time to help banks answer customer questions more quickly. Everything from AI acting as your personal stockbroker to artificial intelligence finding stock predictors to AI running entire hedge funds: it's all here, right now. But within that data, there is space for real decision-making that can improve processes, make for happier customers, and positively affect the bottom line for companies smart enough to jump on sooner rather than later.


harvard-tiny-robotic-arm-endoscopic-laparoscopic-surgery

Engadget

They designed a tiny robotic arm that lays flat while the endoscope is moving through narrow passages and pops up to reveal tools surgeons can use for the procedure. Unlike the typical surgical tools doctors use today, which are completely rigid, the team's creation has a hybrid design featuring a rigid skeleton surrounded by soft materials. By using a combination of the soft and rigid components -- connected to each other by chemical bond instead of adhesive -- the device is more flexible than completely rigid tools. The team already performed an ex-vivo (outside the body) test on a pig's stomach, but that's just the beginning.


THE ROBOT WILL SEE YOU NOW

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The man who is snapping on the surgical gloves while beaming live operations across the globe, in crystal clear 40K VR, is Professor Shafi Ahmed, surgeon, cancer specialist and co-founder of virtual and augmented reality firm Medical Realities When saving lives is second nature, it must feel good to diversify a little, so Professor Ahmed's Wikipedia page also lists him as a'teacher, futurist, innovator, entrepreneur and evangelist' in immersive tech. Working closely with clinicians and experts in film production, animation, CGI, coding and graphics, Medical Realities experiments with virtual reality and wearable tech to stream operations live. Through the company's broadcasts, Medical Realities also aims to make healthcare and surgical access more equitable by training people in parts of the world where they don't have the resources for conventional training. Through the pioneering work of Professor Shafi Ahmed and Medical Realities, this cutting-edge technology looks set to play a much greater role in medical training, treatment and saving lives on the operating tables of the future and Professor Ahmed's relatively simple VR broadcasts could be the start of something truly miraculous.


shrinking-data-for-surgical-training

Robohub

For this research, MGH surgeons identified seven distinct stages in a procedure for removing part of the stomach, and the researchers tagged the beginnings of each stage in eight laparoscopic videos. "We wanted to see how this system works for relatively small training sets," Rosman explains. "If you're in a specific hospital, and you're interested in a specific surgery type, or even more important, a specific variant of a surgery -- all the surgeries where this or that happened -- you may not have a lot of examples." In this case, the system had to learn to identify similarities between frames of video in separate laparoscopic feeds that denoted the same phases of a surgical procedure.


Where Artificial Intelligence Will Pay Off Most in Health Care

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A new report from Accenture Consulting, entitled Artificial Intelligence: Healthcare's New Nervous System, projects the market for health-related AI to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 40% through 2021--to $6.6 billion, from around $600 million in 2014. In that regard, the Accenture report, authored by senior managing director Matthew Collier and colleagues, echoes earlier assessments of the market. They estimate such smart robotic surgery will return $40 billion in "value," or "potential annual benefits…by 2026." "As these, and other AI applications gain more experience in the field, their ability to learn and act will continually lead to improvements in precision, efficiency and outcomes," say the authors.


Trusting robots with our lives

Robohub

Understanding how Intuitive's Da Vinci robot built trust within the medical community could offer parallels to other areas of the automation industry. A decade later, Intuitive received FDA approval for its Da Vinci robot for general surgery, which has since been expanded for prostate, neurological, and thoracic procedures. Last month, the FDA approved the Da Vinci Xi Systems, enabling Intuitive Surgical to market less expensive systems and gain marketshare with smaller medical institutions globally. Similar to robotic medicine, trust-based systems for the military are built by teleporting human expertise into dangerous situations.


Shrinking data for surgical training

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For this research, MGH surgeons identified seven distinct stages in a procedure for removing part of the stomach, and the researchers tagged the beginnings of each stage in eight laparoscopic videos. "We wanted to see how this system works for relatively small training sets," Rosman explains. "If you're in a specific hospital, and you're interested in a specific surgery type, or even more important, a specific variant of a surgery -- all the surgeries where this or that happened -- you may not have a lot of examples." In this case, the system had to learn to identify similarities between frames of video in separate laparoscopic feeds that denoted the same phases of a surgical procedure.


New Grant: Predicting, Preventing Surgery Cancellations with Machine Learning

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Nick Pratap, MB, BChir, of Cincinnati Children's Department of Anesthesia and the Heart Institute and Yizhao Ni, PhD, of the Division of Biomedical Informatics have received a 300,000, two-year grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality that aims to use electronic health records (EHRs) to identify children likely to suffer last-minute surgery cancellation. Already Pratap has led quality improvement efforts at Cincinnati Children's to reduce cancellation by about 16% through use of text-message reminders and clearer pre-operative instructions for families. Information that EHRs can provide about a patient has the potential to reduce health care costs and improve efficiency. The AHRQ R21 grant is provided by the Agency for Healthcare Research Quality to support researchers as they explore a developing area of research.


Robot with sense of touch to allow surgeons to operate remotely

Mashable

Unlike most current keyhole surgery tools, the robot uses haptic feedback to deliver a sense of touch to the operator, as well as 3D images so the surgeon can see where their instruments are placed. The project lead, Mohsen Moradi Dalvand, has been working with medical robotics and haptic systems for almost one decade. "When you have the ability to measure or feel the interaction forces ... you can touch the instruments and feel how stiff [the tissues] are, how soft they are, to what extent the tissues are normal or abnormal." "We are hoping to just fill a gap here, because when we spoke with surgeons, they all spoke about having haptic feedback, a sense of touch, and the limitations they have with the current systems because they do not feel the actual tissue," Dalvand added.


Deakin University unveils first robotic surgical system with sense of touch

ZDNet

Unveiled on Wednesday at the Australasian Simulation Congress, the university claims HeroSurg to be a major breakthrough compared to current technology, which limits robotic surgery to the sense of sight. Giving surgeons the added sense of touch through technology known as haptic feedback means laparoscopic or keyhole microsurgery will be safer and more accurate by reducing trauma and lowering the risk of blood loss and infection. Krishnan, from the Royal Adelaide Hospital and an honorary professor at the Deakin Institute for Intelligent Systems Research and Innovation (IISRI), said HeroSurg's added sense of touch improves the ability of surgeons to distinguish between normal tissue and tissue affected by cancer. "Many clinicians claim the benefits of robotic technology lead to improved quality of life and oncological outcomes."