Surgery


First long-distance heart surgery performed via robot ZDNet

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A doctor in India has performed a series of five percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures on patients who were 20 miles away from him. The feat was pulled off using a precision vascular robot developed by Corindus. The results of the surgeries, which were successful, have just been published in EClinicalMedicine, a spin-off of medical journal The Lancet. The feat is an example of telemedicine, an emerging field that leverages advances in networking, robotics, mixed reality, and communications technologies to beam in medical experts to remote locations for everything from consultations to surgical procedures. Telemedicine, which could decentralize healthcare by distributing doctors into local communities virtually, could ease shortages of nurses and doctors and potentially cut healthcare costs.


Robot Helps Surgeon on World's First Long-Distance Heart Operations Digital Trends

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You're a patient about to undergo heart surgery, but the surgeon performing the procedure hasn't turned up at the hospital and, in fact, is still 20 miles away at the time that the operation is due to be carried out. Not at all, if it's anything like a recently reported world's-first procedure carried out by a surgeon in India. Using a robot called the CorPath GRX, created by a company named Corindus, five patients were the recipients of the first remote. The robot was controlled using a workstation with multiple joysticks, which allowed the surgeon to control the robot in real time while getting visual feedback in the form of livestreaming video showing what it was seeing. The procedure performed was something called (PCI), in which a small structure called a stent is used to open blood vessels in the heart that have been narrowed by plaque buildup.


Robot Helps Surgeon on World's First Long-Distance Heart Operations Digital Trends

#artificialintelligence

You're a patient about to undergo heart surgery, but the surgeon performing the procedure hasn't turned up at the hospital and, in fact, is still 20 miles away at the time that the operation is due to be carried out. Not at all, if it's anything like a recently reported world's-first procedure carried out by a surgeon in India. Using a robot called the CorPath GRX, created by a company named Corindus, five patients were the recipients of the first remote. The robot was controlled using a workstation with multiple joysticks, which allowed the surgeon to control the robot in real time while getting visual feedback in the form of livestreaming video showing what it was seeing. The procedure performed was something called (PCI), in which a small structure called a stent is used to open blood vessels in the heart that have been narrowed by plaque buildup.


'Robot Arm' assisted operations and AI techniques to dominate future: Apollo Doc

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Hyderabad, Sep 8: Dr Mithin Aachi, Sr Ortho & Joint Replacement Surgeon, Apollo Hospitals, Secunderabad on Sunday said that'Robot Arm' assisted navigated knee replacement and Artificial Intelligence Machine Learning, definitely would dominate in future for patient care, there would be an exponential increase in their usage in the years to come. Talking to media on the occasion of 5th edition of Arthroplasty Arthrocopy Summit, organized by Apollo Hospitals under the aegis of Telangana Orthopaedic Surgeon's Association (TOSA) and Twin Cities Orthopaedic Society (TCOS), here, Dr Aachi along with Dr N Somashekar Reddy, Sr Ortho & Joint Replacement Surgeon, Apollo Hospitals said that a Robot doesn't do surgery by itself but it helps the surgeon plan, execute and achieve a better surgical result than he (doctor) would have by human effort alone. Hence Robot surgery in less pain, better outcomes and longer survival rates of joint replacement surgery, he said. Explaining further on Robot surgery, Dr Aachi said usually for a Robot assisted surgery patient undergoes CT scan of the knee to correctly update the surgeon about the deformity and the thickness of bone cuts required and the implant sizes to be placed. This is enhanced planning which gives the surgeon an idea of the type of bone cuts required and the size of implants which will correctly match that patient on an individual level.


Magic Leap teams with Brainlab, SyncThink, and XRHealth for medical AR

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Magic Leap's $2,300 spatial computing platform Magic Leap One may be too expensive for most consumers, but like other early augmented reality devices, enterprise users with bigger pocketbooks are embracing its potential as a business tool. One particularly promising category is health care, where Magic Leap says it's now collaborating with at least five different companies to bring its hardware into labs, clinics, and even hospital operating rooms. On the surgical side, German medical technology company Brainlab is working with Magic Leap on a collaborative 3D spatial viewer for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) content, enabling clinicians to work together when viewing medical images. Brainlab's software could, for example, let a doctor and radiologist talk through multiple brain scans before a surgical procedure, or enable a surgeon to rely on a heads-up display of scanned imagery while performing a procedure. Another brain-focused initiative involves SyncThink, a company that uses eye tracking analytics to help diagnose patients' concussions and balance disorders.


Robot Performs First Long-Distance Heart Surgery

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A surgeon in India has successfully performed the first remote heart surgery on a patient who was lying on an operating table 20 miles away. During the procedure, the CorPath GRX robot--developed by a company called Corindus--inserted a small instrument called a stent in order to open blood vessels in the heart, according to a paper published in EClinicalMedicine. The operation, called percutaneous coronary intervention, is often performed in patients who have a condition called atherosclerosis, where plaque builds up in the blood vessels, restricting blood flow. The long-distance procedure was performed by Dr. Tejas Patel of the Apex Heart Institute in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. "I am honored to have been a part of this medical milestone," Patel told ZDNet.


Guest blog: Future of surgery: robots and genomics

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At a time when pressures on the healthcare system are higher than ever--with challenges for those in need of care and those providing care--a look at advances in technology and medicine currently under development brings up some optimism as to what the future of healthcare might look like. From artificial intelligence and robotics, to genomics and regenerative medicine, there certainly is enough for any sci-fi enthusiast to start taking an interest in the future of medicine. Of course this future is not exactly around the corner, but it's probably much closer than most would think. The proof of concept for some of these technologies is very much available--and in some cases already successfully piloted. The NHS provides many examples of pilots and demonstrations of medical and digital innovation.


Robotic surgery comes to Sharon Regional

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Sharon Regional Medical Center is offering advanced robotic technology to help give patients who need surgery faster recovery times following their procedures. The hospital offers the advanced robotics technologies to patients in Lawrence and Mercer counties, including two individual robotics systems used for general surgery as well as for knee arthroplasty or knee replacement surgery. The new technology includes the da Vinci XI Surgical System with Integrated Table Motion system, which can be used across a spectrum of minimally invasive surgeries including gynecology, urology, thoracic, cardiac and general surgery procedures. The second system is called the NAVIO Surgical System, which is used for knee arthroplasty procedures. Dr. Randy Hofius, a board-certified general surgeon who specializes in hernia and gallbladder surgeries, and Dr. Shateel Nijhawan, a board-certified general and bariatric surgeon, are performing procedures with the da Vinci system; Dr. Stephen Hand, a board-certified orthopedist, will perform the region's first robotic-assisted total knee arthroplasty in the Mercer and Lawrence county areas in the coming weeks.


Dr. AI: Challenges and Opportunities on the Road to AI-enabled Healthcare

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Healthcare systems have evolved rapidly during the last decade and are now providing a variety of benefits to patients throughout the globe. This is because the healthcare industry has embraced artificial intelligence and is currently utilizing its many applications to provide a better and safer experience to patients suffering from different ailments. However, while discussing the benefits AI brings to the healthcare industry, one shouldn't forget that all that glitters in't gold. According to Bob Kocher, MD, an adjunct professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine, "if we are not careful, AI could…unintentionally exacerbate many of the worst aspects of our current healthcare system." This doesn't mean the advantages of AI should be ignored.


A surgical robot with cognitive functions - Saras Project

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Dexterity and perception capabilities of surgical robots may soon be improved by cognitive functions that can support surgeons in decision making and performance monitoring, and enhance the impact of automation within the operating rooms. The practical meaning of each level and the necessary technologies to move from one level to the next are the subject of intense debate and development. In the paper "A Multirobots Teleoperated Platform for Artificial Intelligence Training Data Collection in Minimally Invasive Surgery" we discuss the first outcomes of the European funded project Smart Autonomous Robotic Assistant Surgeon (SARAS). SARAS will develope a cognitive architecture able to make decisions based on pre-operative knowledge and on scene understanding via advanced machine learning algorithms. To reach this ambitious goal that allows us to reach Level 1 and 2, it is of paramount importance to collect reliable data to train the algorithms.