Surgery


shrinking-data-for-surgical-training

Robohub

For this research, MGH surgeons identified seven distinct stages in a procedure for removing part of the stomach, and the researchers tagged the beginnings of each stage in eight laparoscopic videos. "We wanted to see how this system works for relatively small training sets," Rosman explains. "If you're in a specific hospital, and you're interested in a specific surgery type, or even more important, a specific variant of a surgery -- all the surgeries where this or that happened -- you may not have a lot of examples." In this case, the system had to learn to identify similarities between frames of video in separate laparoscopic feeds that denoted the same phases of a surgical procedure.


Where Artificial Intelligence Will Pay Off Most in Health Care

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A new report from Accenture Consulting, entitled Artificial Intelligence: Healthcare's New Nervous System, projects the market for health-related AI to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 40% through 2021--to $6.6 billion, from around $600 million in 2014. In that regard, the Accenture report, authored by senior managing director Matthew Collier and colleagues, echoes earlier assessments of the market. They estimate such smart robotic surgery will return $40 billion in "value," or "potential annual benefits…by 2026." "As these, and other AI applications gain more experience in the field, their ability to learn and act will continually lead to improvements in precision, efficiency and outcomes," say the authors.


Shrinking data for surgical training

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For this research, MGH surgeons identified seven distinct stages in a procedure for removing part of the stomach, and the researchers tagged the beginnings of each stage in eight laparoscopic videos. "We wanted to see how this system works for relatively small training sets," Rosman explains. "If you're in a specific hospital, and you're interested in a specific surgery type, or even more important, a specific variant of a surgery -- all the surgeries where this or that happened -- you may not have a lot of examples." In this case, the system had to learn to identify similarities between frames of video in separate laparoscopic feeds that denoted the same phases of a surgical procedure.


Artificial Intelligence Transforming the Healthcare Industry

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Be it virtual assistants, intelligent automation, or cognitive computing, AI is definitely set to make a big impact on various aspects of healthcare, some of them being operations, patient-centric care, and precision medicine. Currently, AI is already under use in areas like mining medical data, diagnosing medical images, studying genomics-based data for personalized medicine, and improving the lives of the disabled. We, at Grow Fit, are powered by Artificial Intelligence to help our 300,000 users make their health a daily habit. The fact that such innovations can and are helping in better diagnosis, surgical procedures, and improved patient care cannot be ignored.


Moving Beyond Dashboards for Healthcare IT

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For example, in a key resource like the operating room, most health systems can track room and block utilization and drill down to individual surgeons to see their metrics: utilization, first case on-time starts, turnover time, etc. Technologies to make sense of data -- natural language processing, image recognition, predictive analytics and machine learning, to name a few -- have become advanced, mature and practical. Seamless and secure mobile experiences will send intelligent alerts, answer questions and help people be proactive and productive. But even with optimized schedule templates, an infusion center's ground-level reality, with last-minute add-ons that clinics send their way and late cancellations, means that what centers need are simple-to-use but sophisticated mathematically optimized applications that send a "daily huddle report" each morning which lets nurses and infusion staff make fact-based decisions like: Is it because the patients haven't been seen yet?


Entering the post-dashboard era: Build speedboats, not cruise ships

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For example, in a key resource like the operating room, most health systems can track room and block utilization and drill down to individual surgeons to see their metrics: utilization, first-case on-time starts, turnover time, etc. Technologies to make sense of data -- natural language processing, image recognition, predictive analytics and machine learning, to name a few -- have become advanced, mature and practical. Machine learning will help providers understand patterns, make predictions and continuously refine their learning. But even with optimized schedule templates, an infusion center's ground-level reality -- with last-minute add-ons that clinics send their way and late cancellations -- means that what centers need are simple-to-use but sophisticated, mathematically optimized applications that send a "daily huddle report" each morning which lets nurses and infusion staff make fact-based decisions such as: When should nurses not take unscheduled breaks?


Artificial intelligence: coming soon to a hospital near you

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To overcome this problem, my colleagues and I at the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center worked with a game development company called ARA/Virtual Heroes to create a virtual world in which a surgeon can practice team communication and leadership. Future generations of robotic surgery platforms will be more aware of the procedure being performed and use that knowledge and perception to give the surgeon intelligent assistance. Big data and artificial intelligence will bring computer minds to these problems and significantly improve our ability to offer effective health care to individuals and communities. Roger Smith, PhD, is chief technology officer for the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center and a graduate faculty member at the University of Central Florida.


Dr. Robot, please report to the OR

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The most commonly used surgical system using robotic engineering today is DaVinci, which allows doctors to conduct minimally invasive surgeries from a computer screen. "Operations in cavities, in the stomach or chest area, are gradually no longer being done with big incisions, but using minimally invasive robot-assisted systems," says Klaus-Peter J√ľnemann, Director of Kiel University Hospital, where robot-assisted surgery is already practiced. There are nearly 1.5 million medication errors made annually in the United States alone. Watson reached its result after comparing the woman's generic information with data sets from 20 million clinical cancer studies.


Work in an automated future

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In what is now called the fourth Industrial Revolution, technologies that are coming of age--including robotics, nanotechnology, virtual reality, 3D printing, the Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, and advanced biology--will converge. The first Industrial Revolution moved British manufacturing from people's homes into factories, and marked the beginning of hierarchical organization. During the third Industrial Revolution, modes of production were further automated by electronics and by information and communication technology, with many human jobs moving from manufacturing into services. Last but not least, to ensure that the fourth Industrial Revolution translates into economic growth and bears fruit for all, we must work together to create new regulatory ecosystems.


'The rise of the machines: lessons from history on how to adapt

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In what we now call the Fourth Industrial Revolution, we will see the confluence of several technologies that are coming of age, including robotics, nanotechnology, virtual reality, 3D printing, the Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI) and advanced biology. And as electronics and information technology automated production during the third industrial revolution, many human jobs started to become service-driven. Instead of focusing on the specific jobs that will appear or disappear, we should instead concentrate on the skills that will be needed, then educate, train and reskill the human workforce to leverage the new opportunities afforded by technology. Government will have a crucial role to play, along with business and civil society leaders, in driving the appropriate levels of collaboration, regulation and standards that will be needed to ensure that the fourth industrial revolution translates into economic growth and creates benefits for all.