Pharmaceuticals & Biotechnology


4 Ways IBM Watson's Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Healthcare

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Some say that artificial intelligence (AI) will radically change healthcare in the future. But that prediction overlooks an important detail: AI is already significantly changing healthcare. IBM (NYSE:IBM) Watson Health general manager Deborah DiSanzo spoke at the annual J. P. Morgan Healthcare Conference on Wednesday. She provided an update on the progress that IBM Watson, the AI system famous for beating Jeopardy! DiSanzo highlighted four areas where AI is making a big difference today.


The Unabomber: uncanny prophecies of a dangerous man

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He predicted that machines would eventually displace people in the workplace and that this would ultimately put the human race at the mercy of technology. This was written on a typewriter at a time when the internet was in its infancy, desktop computers were large, boxy affairs too expensive for most of us, and artificial intelligence was a fringe science, treated with derision by most. He explained: "As society and the problems that face it become more and more complex and as machines become more and more intelligent, people will let machines make more and more of their decisions for them, simply because machine-made decisions will bring better results than man-made ones. "Eventually a stage may be reached at which the decisions necessary to keep the system running will be so complex that human beings will be incapable of making them intelligently. At that stage the machines will be in effective control.


This Startup Uses AI to Get you Pregnant

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Can you get pregnant using Artificial Intelligence? One American startup is trying to make it so. Mira Care, which SHACK15 News met up at CES 2018, has designed a gadget that harnesses machine learning to track hormone levels, and suggest how likely a user is to conceive a baby at a given time. Users just need to pee on a test stick and insert it in the device; then, Mira's algorithm will blend data from the sample with information about each user's fitness and life habits in order to calculate a fertility score, which will be shown on a mobile app. Mira's AI-powered device and its linked app showing a user's fertility score (via Mira Care) "One difference with any other menstrual cycle tracker is personalization," company CEO Zheng Yang said."It


Most Effective Birth Control Methods: Does Natural Cycles Contraceptive App Work?

International Business Times

More than 50 women in Sweden who said they used the Natural Cycles app as contraception ended up pregnant and reported their cases to the Medical Product Agency, according to a statement from Natural Cycles. The app, a certified contraceptive in Europe, has about the same failure rates as the pill, but only under certain circumstances, according to experts. "Natural methods, when used correctly, are very very effective," Richard J. Fehring, professor, and director of the Marquette University College of Nursing Institute for Natural Family Planning, told International Business Times. The Natural Cycles app uses an algorithm to calculate the days a woman is fertile and therefore most likely to get pregnant and when used properly, it claims to be about as effective as the pill. The app requires that users take their temperature each morning and input it into the app, then after some calculations, the app says whether users are "not fertile," or should "use protection."


4 Ways IBM Watson's Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

Some say that artificial intelligence (AI) will radically change healthcare in the future. But that prediction overlooks an important detail: AI is already significantly changing healthcare. IBM (NYSE:IBM) Watson Health general manager Deborah DiSanzo spoke at the annual J. P. Morgan Healthcare Conference on Wednesday. She provided an update on the progress that IBM Watson, the AI system famous for beating Jeopardy! DiSanzo highlighted four areas where AI is making a big difference today.


26 Observations From CES 2018 – SOSV: Inspiration from Acceleration – Medium

@machinelearnbot

There was no dominant theme. As for classics: basic smartwatches and trackers were barely there (those markets are too mature already), AR/VR seemed to be entering a new phase, with practical applications (mostly B2B, from surgery to manufacturing), and drones are… too 2015. Compared to previous years, most booth designs and brands looked neat. CES is the Consumer Electronics Show, but B2B was definitely on the rise. Products tend to be less flashy but address a true business problem.


4 Ways IBM Watson's Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

Some say that artificial intelligence (AI) will radically change healthcare in the future. But that prediction overlooks an important detail: AI is already significantly changing healthcare. IBM (NYSE: IBM) Watson Health general manager Deborah DiSanzo spoke at the annual J. P. Morgan Healthcare Conference on Wednesday. She provided an update on the progress that IBM Watson, the AI system famous for beating Jeopardy! DiSanzo highlighted four areas where AI is making a big difference today.


Machine Learning And Medicine: Made For Each Other

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Analysts predict that artificial intelligence and machine learning will disrupt almost every industry – education, financial services, transportation, and retail among them. But more often than not, healthcare leads their list as the top candidate. Here are a just a few examples of how these technologies are transforming the industry. Some sources cite that the average cost of bringing a new drug to market has increased to record levels – almost US$2 billion for the biggest companies. McKinsey & Company believes that Big Data strategies that result in better informed decision making could optimize innovation and improve the efficiency of research and clinical trials.


Xconomy: Hc1 Uses Artificial Intelligence to Uncover Opioid Crisis Insights

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As the opioid crisis continues to wreak havoc on the nation's health and productivity, an Indianapolis-based startup called hc1 is applying artificial intelligence to a vast array of datasets in an attempt to uncover insights aimed at decreasing opioid misuse, abuse, and addiction. Brad Bostic, CEO of hc1, describes his venture as a healthcare relationship management company, a term he coined in 2011, the same year he started the company. With the rapid growth of cloud storage technologies, Bostic founded hc1 to harness the abundance of siloed data at both the patient and provider levels and create holistic consumer profiles that could span providers, and thus improve care. So far, hc1 has amassed 90 million HIPAA-compliant consumer profiles and has more than 1,000 customers that subscribe to its customer-relationship and data-parsing services. The current state of American healthcare, Bostic says, is "impersonal and appalling."


Microsoft to use artificial intelligence to improve CRISPR

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The primary medical potential of the gene-editing technology CRISPR is to eliminate many types of genetic diseases,. This could be achieved through eliminating certain genetic codes responsible for specific illness. There are various barriers to achieving this, ranging from public policy, to funding, and the current state of the technology itself. Another issues arises with so-called off-target effects. This means induced mutations at sites other than the intended on-target site.