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Epidemiology


Startups Apply Artificial Intelligence To Supply Chain Disruptions

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Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multi-billion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc, Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


How AI is helping to Address Staffing Shortages in Healthcare

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Over the last two years, staffing shortages in healthcare have impacted many hospital and healthcare facility business operations, especially during emergency events like COVID-19. A resourceful approach is overdue, and artificial intelligence might have a part in ensuring the continuity of patient care and security by using various AI tools. For the past two years, the whole world is facing a harsh time due to Covid-19 and most of its effect comes on the healthcare industry. Doctors and healthcare frontlines are working never-ending shifts because the no. of patients is rising day by day which makes them also think about their career once in their lifetime. Many highly skilled healthcare professionals, who tend to be older, are choosing to retire rather than face the Covid-19 associated risks of working in a hospital.


Startups apply artificial intelligence to supply chain disruptions

#artificialintelligence

LONDON, May 3 (Reuters) - Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multi-billion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc, Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


Startups apply artificial intelligence to supply chain disruptions

The Japan Times

LONDON – Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multibillion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc., Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp. and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


Scientists Develop a Machine Learning Model to Predict the Evolution of an Epidemic Accurately - CBIRT

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According to a new KAUST study, machine learning approaches can achieve an assumption-free analysis of epidemic case data with amazingly good prediction accuracy and the flexibility to incorporate new data dynamically. Yasminah Alali, an intern in KAUST's 2021 Saudi Summer Internship (SSI) program, developed a proof of concept that reveals a possible alternative to traditional parameter-driven mechanistic models by removing human bias and assumptions from analysis, revealing the underlying story of the data. Using publicly released COVID-19 incidence and recovery data from India and Brazil, Alali leveraged her experience working with artificial intelligence models to design a framework to fit the characteristics and time-evolving nature of epidemic data in collaboration with KAUST's Ying Sun and Fouzi Harrou. To create an effective Gaussian process regression (GPR) based model for forecasting recovered and confirmed COVID-19 cases in two significantly impacted countries, India and Brazil, the researchers first used Bayesian optimization to modify the Gaussian process regression (GPR) hyperparameters. However, the time dependency in the COVID-19 data series is ignored by machine learning models.


Top 3 Digital Transformation Strategies of 2022

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The past two years of the pandemic have been marked by a period of rapid technological change. Amidst supply chain disruptions and changes in consumer behaviours, organisations have turned to digital transformation strategies to stay agile and resilient. The COVID-19 crisis has made it clear that technology is the lynchpin of organisational resilience and agility. As the pandemic disrupted global supply chains, forced employees to work from home and triggered a massive shift of consumer behaviour to online channels, digital technologies have played a pivotal role in keeping organisations afloat. According to Google's State of the API Economy 2021, digital transformation was the leading business imperative of 2020, based on a survey of 700 IT decision-makers from around the world.


Should Artificial Intelligence be Regulated to Protect Jobs?

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For over 23 years, Larry Collins worked as a toll collector on the Carquinez Bridge in San Francisco. He loved his job -- every day, he would come to work and greet drivers, provide directions, answer questions, and collect toll fees. Over the years, although the toll price had changed tremendously, his job was always in a stable condition. But, this all changed during March of 2020. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, Collins was suddenly informed that his tollbooth was getting shut down and replaced by an artificial intelligence-based toll collector machine. Collins was not the lone victim of industrial automation unemployment, just in the Northern California region, 185 other toll booths were also shut down and replaced by technological alternatives (Semuels). As the 21st-century technological advances continue, applications of artificial intelligence are expected to expand exponentially. Slowly but surely, artificial intelligence is automating a multitude of manual jobs, causing widespread unemployment around the world (Peterson). There is clear uncertainty about the future of artificial intelligence. A recent report from the conference on Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection suggested that the European Commission (EU), is strongly "considering the possibility of legislating for Artificial Intelligence". This legislation would explore a number of nuances that come with future artificial intelligence job automation and will consider the implementation of a novel regulatory framework (MacCarthy). On the other hand, organizations such as Deltec, an international financial research institute, are in support of artificial intelligence automation and don't want regulation as it would hinder humanity's ability to research and solve problems in an efficient manner (Trehan). Currently, there has been no clear conclusion to this ongoing debate -- experts have varying opinions but agree that a full-proof solution is direly needed.


Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Education Market 2022 Statistical Forecasts 2028 – Cognii, Carnegie Learning, Microsoft, Third Space Learning, Metacog and Bridge-U - Buckeyes 101

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The global Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Education industry research digs into the topic, covering classifications, implementations, meanings, and supply chain frameworks. The production position, development objectives, efforts, and cost information are all briefly mentioned in the report. The most recent industry study survey, which is being provided to a global audience, comprises development patterns, an Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Education industry prognosis, and the growth status of important areas. The report also looks at the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on global consumer pricing, market share, and yearly growth rate. The global Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Education research report evaluates the industry's current condition and future prospects, as well as the market size and market share by geography.


The Hazard-Filled Ruling on the Transportation Mask Mandate

The New Yorker

"At first blush," Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle wrote in her order, on Monday, throwing out the federal mask mandate for people using public conveyances--planes, trains, Ubers--it might appear that the mandate was rather "closely related to the powers granted" to the federal health authorities by law. Indeed, it appears, at any blush, to be intimately related, which is why the ruling issued by Mizelle, a federal district-court judge based in Tampa, Florida, is so alarming. The Public Health Service Act of 1944 gives federal health authorities broad powers "to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases" by means of interstate modes of transport, and to do so by establishing rules related to "inspection, fumigation, disinfection, sanitation, pest extermination, destruction of animals or articles found to be so infected or contaminated as to be sources of dangerous infection to human beings," as well as by "other measures" that in their "judgment may be necessary." Mizelle's ruling, which inspired social-media videos of people gleefully unmasking on airplanes, was sudden and startlingly broad. She did not rely on narrow ground such as the fact that, at this stage in the COVID-19 crisis, hospitalization rates are low and vaccines are widely available, and so a transportation mask mandate might no longer be justified. Instead, she found that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention never had the power to issue such a mandate and thus would not be able to do so in the future, no matter the shape of a future pandemic.


Bay Area drone company Zipline starts delivering medicine in Japan

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TOKYO -- Zipline, an American company that specializes in using autonomously flying drones to deliver medical supplies, has taken off in Japan. Other parts of Japan may follow, including urban areas, although the biggest needs tend to be in isolated rural areas. Zipline, founded six years ago, already is in service in the U.S., where it has partnered with Walmart Inc. to deliver other products at the retail chain as well as drugs. It is also delivering medical goods in Ghana and Rwanda. Its takeoff in Japan is in partnership with Toyota Tsusho, a group company of Japan's top automaker Toyota Motor Corp. "You can totally transform the way that you react to pandemics, treat patients and do things like home health care delivery," Zipline Chief Executive Keller Rinaudo told The Associated Press.