Space Agency


Space Station gets new floating robo-camera ball

Daily Mail

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has unveiled the first images captured by its spherical camera drone on the International Space Station. The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.' The camera ball uses 3D printed internal and external components, and uses drone technology such as Miniaturized Attitude Control Sensors and Actuators in an'All-in-one Module.'


Buzz of drones is more annoying than any other kind of vehicle

New Scientist

Amazon, UPS, Domino's Pizza and other companies planning drone delivery services may be heading for discord. A preliminary NASA study has discovered that people find the noise of drones more annoying than that of ground vehicles, even when the sounds are the same volume. "We didn't go into this test thinking there would be this significant difference," says study coauthor Andrew Christian of NASA's Langley Research Center, Virginia. However, Christian points out that simply making drones "only as noisy" as delivery trucks would still mean they are more annoying, meaning companies may need to find ways to make their drones significantly quieter than ground vehicles.


Meet the International Space Station's adorable camera drone

Engadget

Astronauts on board the International Space Station have a new robotic companion to play around with. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released the first images shot by the "Int-Ball," a spherical camera that floats around alongside the rest of the crew. JAXA says crew members spend 10 percent of their working hours with a camera in hand, photographing work or equipment that requires further evaluation. A floating camera drone could, in theory, alleviate the crew of that responsibility, giving them more time to conduct experiments and carry out repairs.


Nasa admits it can't afford to land humans on Mars

The Independent

The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art ...


NASA's drone killer does not play around

Mashable

NASA isn't one to mess around when it comes to security, and their Safeguard technology is clear proof of that. NASA's software system -- the aforementioned Safeguard -- uses an invisible fence around secure geographical locations. The Safeguard technology itself is small enough to be mounted on any drone. This means places like airports, stadiums, military bases, and other secure locations.


NASA's Safeguard Tech Stops Trespassing Drones Without Touching Them

WIRED

It works like this: A software system called Safeguard monitors the drone's proximity to FAA-designated no-fly-zones like airports, military installations, and stadiums. New NASA Tech Tells Drones When They're Broken--and Helps Them Land How Do Drones Fly? For one thing, most geofencing systems rely on GPS, which is prone to signal loss or interference. If successful, the system could be one fewer reason for drone-safety advocates to stay up at night--and one more incentive for drone manufacturers to make sure their systems stay away from no-fly zones on their own.


NASA will use artificial intelligence for planetary defense -

#artificialintelligence

NASA's Frontier Development Lab (FDL), a public-private research institute operated jointly by the space agency's Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute, announced it will use artificial intelligence to study methods of protecting the Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids and comets. The announcement was made on Friday, June 30, designated in 2014 as International Asteroid Day, an annual event that addresses potential threats from Near Earth Objects (NEOs). For this year's event, FDL assembled a research team to discuss the ways artificial intelligence can assist in planetary defense. In addition to addressing the issue of potentially hazardous asteroids and comets, the researchers also dealt with the possible threat from solar storms.


Artificial intelligence better than scientists at choosing successful IVF embryos

#artificialintelligence

Stuart Lavery, director of the Boston Place Clinic, said the technology would not replace examining chromosomes in detail, which is thought to be a key factor in determining which embryos are "normal" or "abnormal". It is the outermost of five planets circling a star that is smaller and cooler than the sun discovered by the American space agency Nasa's Kepler space telescope in 2013 Scientists have taken a leaf out of the script of The Martian by showing how easy it would be to grow your own veg on the Red Planet. Specific parts of the brain do show sex differences, but individual brains rarely have all "male" traits or all "female" traits. Since dogs' anatomy is similar to those of humans', intentionally creating dogs with certain human genetic traits could allow scientists to further understand how they occur Nasa has announced that it has found evidence of flowing water on Mars.


Put deep learning neural network AI software from NASA in your apps

#artificialintelligence

Their neural network software - originally developed for NASA - uses a bio-inspired approach to mimic the way the human brain learns and analyzes its environment. This software enables a variety of smart products - from self-driving cars and industrial drones to toys, consumer electronics and smart cameras - to learn, adapt and interact in real time. For example, toys can learn to identify their owners, security cameras can identify specific threats, drones can learn how to diagnose problems at the tops of cell towers, saving humans considerable danger and drudgery, and self-driving cars can be safer and learn to avoid obstacles.


Nasa creates a sticky 'space Velcro' gripper

Daily Mail

Sticky'space Velcro' grippers based on the adhesive feet of geckos have been developed by Nasa to clear up dangerous space junk in orbit. Sticky'space Velcro' grippers based on the adhesive feet of geckos have been developed by Nasa to clear up dangerous space junk in orbit. Most proposed solutions, including debris harpoons, either require or cause forceful interaction with the debris, which could push those objects in unintended, unpredictable directions. Most proposed solutions, including debris harpoons, either require or cause forceful interaction with the debris, which could push those objects in unintended, unpredictable directions.