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"Ban Killer Robots" - AI Experts Urge Governments

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Two open letters have been sent by Artificial Intelligence experts to the Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, which was signed by 122 AI researchers, and to the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, which had 216 signatures on it.


'Killer robots' that can decide whether people live or die must be banned, warn hundreds of experts

The Independent

Hundreds of artificial intelligence experts have urged the Canadian and Australian governments to ban "killer robots". They say that delegating life-or-death decisions to machines crosses "a clear moral line", and that the development of autonomous weapons will result in machines, rather than people, deciding who lives and who dies. Such systems, including drones, military robots and unmanned vehicles, should be treated in the same way as chemical weapons, biological weapons and nuclear weapons, they say. An open letter addressed to Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has been signed by 122 AI researchers, while an open letter sent to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has 216 signatories. Toby Walsh, the organiser of the Australian letter and Scientia Professor of AI at UNSW Sydney, said, "The Canadian AI research community is clear: we must not permit AI to target or kill without meaningful human control.


Justin Trudeau explains why Canada really 'gets' AI and smart cities

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At Google's Go North event today in Toronto, which features a slate of speakers focused primarily on artificial intelligence, Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt spoke to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (and actually asked him some tough questions on NAFTA negotiations and his feelings about Trump, surprisingly). Trudeau talked a lot about the Canadian perspective on innovation, and about why Canada is doing so well with regards to acting as a hub for research and development around artificial intelligence in general. "I just think Canadians realize better than most that there is an opportunity here," Trudeau began, also nothing that this extends not only to the innovation side, but also to the "consequences of AI, the consequences of automation," and the "economic imbalance of those who own the robots and those who are displaced by them." Trudeau explained that while he has no specific foresight in terms of where technological progress with artificial intelligence is taking us, he believes it's not up to the Canadian government to "pick winners," but that instead that it is their role to say that they're going to "invest in quantum, we're gonna invest in AI, we're going to invest in robotics, we're going to invest in high-value, innovative, creative, groundbreaking areas" that match the Canadian education system and the country's entrepreneurial values. He added that Canada has a drive to search for a way to "be relevant in a positive way on the world stage," and that AI fits with that goal, as does investment in other high-tech areas.


Watch Live: Justin Trudeau To Discuss Artificial Intelligence in Canada

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The New York Times will be live streaming select panels from Google's Go North Canada conference on artificial intelligence. Tune in on November 2nd, 2017 at 10 a.m. to watch Prime Minister Justin Trudeau discuss Canada's role in the world of A.I. At 3:55 p.m. Times reporter Cade Metz will interview Geoffrey Hinton, professor emeritus of computer science at the University of Toronto who is a pioneer of A.I. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.


Why Artificial Intelligence Should Be More Canadian

@machinelearnbot

Canada has produced several big breakthroughs in artificial intelligence in recent years, and its government is keen to establish the country as a global epicenter of AI. The country's prime minister, Justin Trudeau, also hopes that the technology will learn Canadian values as it grows up. Speaking at a major AI event in Toronto today, Trudeau demonstrated an impressive enthusiasm for AI and machine learning, at one point even taking a stab at describing the concept of deep reinforcement learning, an approach that lets computers learn to do complex things that can't be programmed manually (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2017: Reinforcement Learning"). Both deep reinforcement learning and deep neural networks, which the method exploits, were pioneered by researchers working at Canadian universities. The country's government is now investing in big efforts to spur more AI research.


Google to create its own neighbourhood with weather management systems and 'flexible' buildings

The Independent

Google is set to build a "new kind" of high-tech neighbourhood that will be unlike anywhere else in the world. The company has revealed radical plans for the town, which will be called Quayside. It will feature flexible buildings that can be completely reconfigured at speed, and Google will even attempt to "mitigate" the weather, to encourage people to spend more time outside. It's an astonishing vision, which Google hopes to turn into "a blueprint for the 21st-century urban neighbourhood". Quayside will be built on Toronto's Eastern Waterfront, with the project being undertaken by Google subsidiary Sidewalk Labs and the Canadian government.


Canada, a leader in AI, now makes its foray into driverless car technology

The Japan Times

TORONTO – Having built an impressive lead in artificial intelligence, Canada is keen to do the same in driverless cars -- specifically the lidar (laser radar) technology that lets these vehicles see where they're going. The Quebec City-based company makes solid-state technology it says is better and cheaper than earlier versions of lidar and sells it to parts makers, which in turn bake it into their hardware. LeddarTech has attracted big-name industry backers including Delphi Automotive, Germany's Osram Licht and Fiat Chrysler's parts division, which last month participated in a $101 million fundraising round. There's a race on to get self-driving cars on the road over the next four years and lidar is a key component in making that possible. The market for the technology will grow tenfold to $2.5 billion by 2027, according to Akhilesh Kona, a senior analyst at IHS Markit, and become much bigger as cars become increasingly autonomous.


Facebook heads to Canada in search of the next big AI advance

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Several leading figures in AI, including LeCun, have studied or taught at Canadian universities. Reinforcement learning builds on deep learning to let machines learn through experimentation. Michael Bowling, a U.S.-born computer scientist who leads a lab at the University of Alberta that has produced cutting-edge poker-playing machines, says the new Facebook lab simply shows that Canada already leads the rest of the world in AI. Indeed, after seeing AI researchers snapped up by big U.S. companies in recent years, Canada may well hope that the environment fostered by new labs, including the one in Montreal, will eventually produce companies that rival the likes of Facebook.


Facebook heads to Canada in search of the next big AI advance

#artificialintelligence

Several leading figures in AI, including LeCun, have studied or taught at Canadian universities. Reinforcement learning builds on deep learning to let machines learn through experimentation. Michael Bowling, a U.S.-born computer scientist who leads a lab at the University of Alberta that has produced cutting-edge poker-playing machines, says the new Facebook lab simply shows that Canada already leads the rest of the world in AI. Indeed, after seeing AI researchers snapped up by big U.S. companies in recent years, Canada may well hope that the environment fostered by new labs, including the one in Montreal, will eventually produce companies that rival the likes of Facebook.


new-facebook-research-facility-open-montreal

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The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today took part in Facebook's announcement that they will open a new AI lab in Montréal – the company's first intelligence lab in Canada, and only its second outside of the United States. By next year, the lab is expected to employ a team of twenty researchers headed by McGill University's Dr. Joelle Pineau, a leading AI researcher. This new lab will help grow a stronger Canadian technology ecosystem. Facebook's new lab in Montréal will underline Canada's status as a global AI powerhouse, and a leader in the economy of the future -- and encourage other leading tech companies to set up shop here and create good, middle class jobs for Canadians."