Canada Government


VPRI looking to engage in collegial conversation around Artificial Intelligence – YFile

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is of great interest to the research world today, potentially driving innovative problem-solving. Both the federal and provincial governments have imagined this potential. The Ontario government has invested in the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence, a flagship of its development in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to make Ontario a source of high-quality professionals and to attract an industrial base of the information technology (IT) and the AI sectors. The Ministry of Research, Innovation & Science is also commissioning a report to develop a provincial strategy. On the federal side, Ottawa has invested $120 million of direct support and $36 million has been allocated for Vector AI chairs for existing and newly recruited individuals.


Canada is exploring using AI to help prevent suicide

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Suicide is the second most common cause of death in people between the ages of 10 and 19 in Canada. Despite the country's preventative efforts, the number of suicides continues to grow year after year. Existing efforts include increased funding for suicide research, new mental wellness educational programs, and human-assisted monitoring of national suicide statistics. Though these efforts provide an important foundation for preventing suicide in Canada, it's clear additional tactics are needed to save more lives. This is where the predictive and scalable capabilities of AI could offer assistance.


Canada is exploring using AI to help prevent suicide

#artificialintelligence

Suicide is the second most common cause of death in people between the ages of 10 and 19 in Canada. Despite the country's preventative efforts, the prevalence of suicide continues to grow year over year. Existing efforts include ramped up suicide research funding, the addition of new mental wellness educational programs, and human-assisted monitoring of national suicide statistics. Though these efforts provide an important foundation for preventing suicide in Canada, it's clear additional tactics are necessary to save more lives. This is where the predictive and scalable capabilities of AI could offer assistance.


Canada will use AI to monitor suicidal social media posts

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This year the Canadian government will start using artificial intelligence to help track social media posts that could indicate someone is at risk of suicide, according to a contract. The Canadian government recently signed a contract with Ottawa-based AI firm Advanced Symbolics to monitor social media posts for suicidal behavior. In the first phase of the partnership, Advanced Symbolics will work with the government to define "suicide-related behavior," according to the contract. This is typically defined through thoughts, behaviors, and communications. The company will then identify patterns that are associated with these behaviors based on online data.


Ottawa turns to AI to search social media for patterns of suicide-related behaviour

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The Canadian government will soon hire an Ottawa-based company specializing in social media monitoring and artificial intelligence to forecast potential spikes in suicide risk. A contract with Advanced Symbolics Inc., an AI and market research firm, is set to be finalized next month. Working with the company to develop its strategy, the federal government will define "suicide-related behaviour" on social media and "use that classifier to conduct market research on the general population of Canada," according to a document published to Public Works website. This pilot project will last three months, after which the government "will determine if future work would be useful for ongoing suicide surveillance," the tender document said. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death for Canadians aged 10 to 19, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada.


Ottawa turns to AI to predict suicide through social media searches

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The Canadian government will soon hire an Ottawa-based company specializing in social media monitoring and artificial intelligence to forecast spikes in suicide rates. A contract with Advanced Symbolics Inc., an AI and market research firm, is set to be finalized next month. Working with the company to develop its strategy, the federal government will define "suicide-related behaviour" on social media and "use that classifier to conduct market research on the general population of Canada," according to a document published to Public Works website. This pilot project will last three months, after which the government "will determine if future work would be useful for ongoing suicide surveillance," the tender document said. Instead of calling people to assess public opinion, Advanced Symbolics conducts its market research by identifying and tracking social media accounts to build a representative sample of a population.


Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister of Canada) in conversation with Shivon Zilis (Bloomberg Beta)

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This video clip is from the Creative Destruction Lab's third annual conference, "Machine Learning and the Market for Intelligence", hosted at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management on October 26, 2017. The Creative Destruction Lab is a seed-stage program for massively-scalable, science-based companies. Graduates include companies such as Atomwise (San Francisco), Thalmic Labs (Waterloo), Deep Genomics (Toronto), Kyndi (Palo Alto), Nymi (Toronto), Automat (Montreal), Ada (Toronto), and Heuritech (Paris). This year, the program admitted 125 AI-oriented startups in Toronto and another 40 at other CDL locations across Canada. To our knowledge, this is the third year in a row that the CDL is home to the greatest concentration of AI startups of any program on Earth.


Diversity must be the driver of artificial intelligence

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The question over what to do about biases and inequalities in the technology industry is not a new one. The number of women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has always been disproportionately less than men. What may be more perplexing is, why is it getting worse? It's 2017, and yet according to the American Association of University Women (AAUW) in a review of more than 380 studies from academic journals, corporations, and government sources, there is a major employment gap for women in computing and engineering. North America, as home to leading centres of innovation and technology, is one of the worst offenders.


Artificial intelligence – a video to promote Montréal around the world - Montreal International

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Montréal International used the opportunity of the 31st Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) Conference, which had over 25,000 attendees this week in California, to launch a video promoting Greater Montréal as a world leader in AI, before all the international talent and investors at the conference. The video is titled Montréal, an Artificial Intelligence Powerhouse, and features several headliners in the industry, including Yoshua Bengio (Université de Montréal), Doina Precup (McGill University), Hugo Larochelle (Google Brain), Yann LeClun (Facebook), as well as the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau. The video highlights all of Montréal's advantages and the deep collaboration between research chairs, laboratories and entrepreneurs. "Home to over 250 leading researchers and a one-of-a-kind collaborative ecosystem, Greater Montréal has become one of the world's most attractive AI hubs in less than two years," said Hubert Bolduc, President and CEO of Montréal International. "Last year, an impressive 20% of the investments we facilitated were in the AI sector, which continues to draw influential top players," added Mr. Bolduc.


"Ban Killer Robots" - AI Experts Urge Governments

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Two open letters have been sent by Artificial Intelligence experts to the Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, which was signed by 122 AI researchers, and to the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, which had 216 signatures on it.