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In Texas, driverless trucks are set to take over roads

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A giant 18-wheel transport truck is barreling down a multi-lane Texas highway, and there is no one behind the wheel. The futuristic idea may seem surreal, but it is being tested in this vast southern US state, which has become the epicenter of a rapidly developing self-driving vehicle industry. Before driverless trucks are allowed onto roads and highways, however, multiple tests must still be conducted to ensure they are safe. Self-driving lorries are operated using radars, laser scanners, cameras and GPS antennas that communicate with piloting software. "Each time we drive a mile or a kilometer in real life, we re-simulate a thousand more times on the computer by changing hundreds of parameters," explains Pierre-François Le Faou, trucking partner development manager at Waymo, the self-driving unit at Google's parent company Alphabet.


New Report Offers Glimpse Of How AI Will Remake Spywork

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Unless the intelligence community changes the way it defines intelligence and adopts cloud computing, it will wind up behind adversaries, private interests, and even the public in knowing what might happen, according to a new report from the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Intelligence collection to predict broad geopolitical and military events has historically been the job of well-funded and expertly staffed government agencies like the CIA or the NSA. But, the report argues, the same institutional elements that allowed the government to create those agencies are now slowing them down in a time of large publicly-available datasets and enterprise cloud capabilities. The report, scheduled to be released Wednesday, looks at a hypothetical "open-source, cloud-based, AI-enabled reporting," or OSCAR, tool for the intelligence community, a tool that could help the community much more rapidly detect and act on clues about major geopolitical or security events. The report lists the various procedural, bureaucratic, and cultural barriers within the intelligence community that block its development and use by U.S. spy agencies.


Update on Artificial Intelligence as a Patent Inventor

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Our previous blog posts, Artificial Intelligence as the Inventor of Life Sciences Patents? and Update on Artificial Intelligence: Court Rules that AI Cannot Qualify As "Inventor," discuss recent inventorship issues surrounding AI and its implications for life sciences innovations. Continuing our series, we now look at the appeal recently filed by Stephen Thaler ("Thaler") in his quest to obtain a patent for an invention created by AI in the absence of a traditional human inventor. As we previously reported, on September 3, 2021, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia ruled that an AI machine cannot qualify as an "inventor" under the Patent Act, in a case that Thaler filed seeking, among other things, an order compelling the USPTO to reinstate his patent applications. Those patent applications name an AI system called "Device for Autonomous Bootstrapping of Unified Sentience" aka "DABUS," as the sole inventor. Thaler, who developed DABUS, remains the owner of any patent rights stemming from these applications.


Human error in data analytics, and how to fix it using artificial intelligence

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The benefits of analytics are well-documented. Analytics has helped organisations transform retail experiences, map pathways for trains and trucks, discover extraterrestrial life, and even predict diseases. However, over the past few years, organisations across the globe have wrestled with just how much human error has permeated their analytics attempts, often ending with disastrous results. From crashing spacecraft to sinking ships, transferring billions of dollars to unintended recipients, and causing deaths due to overdose of medication, human error in data analysis has far-reaching ramifications for organisations. The reason for human error in data analysis could be many, such as lack of experience, fatigue or loss of attention, lack of knowledge, or the all-too-common biases in interpreting data. However, what's common among these errors is that they are related to humans reading, processing, analysing, and interpreting data.


DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman departs Google

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DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman has departed Google after an eight-year stint at the company. Suleyman co-founded AI giant DeepMind alongside Demis Hassabis and Shane Legg in 2010 before it was acquired by Google in 2014 for $500 million. DeepMind has become somewhat of an AI darling and has repeatedly made headlines for creating neural networks that have beat human capabilities in a range of games. DeepMind's AlphaGo even beat Go world champion Lee Sedol in a five-game match. He left for Google in 2019 and was most recently the company's vice president of AI product management and policy.


An inside look at how one person can control a swarm of 130 robots

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Last November, at Fort Campbell, Tennessee, half a mile from the Kentucky border, a single human directed a swarm of 130 robots. The exercise was part of DARPA's OFFensive Swarm-Enabled Tactics (OFFSET) program. If the experiment can be replicated outside the controlled settings of a test environment, it suggests that managing swarms in war could be as easy as point and click for operators in the field. "The operator of our swarm really was interacting with things as a collective, not as individuals," says Shane Clark, of Raytheon BBN, who was the company's main lead for OFFSET. "We had done the work to establish the sort of baseline levels of autonomy to really support those many-to-one interactions in a natural way."


Surgalign receives FDA clearance for AI-driven HOLO Portal system for spine surgery - Spinal News International

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Surgalign Holdings has announced that it has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for its HOLO Portal surgical guidance system for use within lumbar spine procedures. According to Surgalign, the HOLO Portal system is the world's first artificial intelligence (AI)-driven augmented reality (AR) guidance system for spine and the first clinical application of Surgalign's HOLO AI digital health platform. Terry Rich, president and chief executive officer of Surgalign, said: "Receiving the initial clearance for the HOLO Portal system is a significant milestone and represents a critical step toward building the foundation of the digital surgery of the future. This system is designed to improve patient outcomes by delivering intelligent solutions to our customers, and we believe it is truly revolutionary. "With clearance in hand for our guidance application, our near-term focus is getting the platform into the hands of surgeons as we work towards a market release.


Can China create a world-beating AI industry?

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"SOUTH OF THE Huai river few geese can be seen through the rain and snow." In classical Chinese this verse is a breakthrough--not in literature but in computing power. The line, composed by an artificial intelligence (AI) language model called Wu Dao 2.0, is indistinguishable in metre and tone from ancient poetry. The lab that built the software, the Beijing Academy of Artificial Intelligence (BAAI), challenges visitors to its website to distinguish between Wu Dao and flesh-and-blood 8th-century masters. Anecdotal evidence suggests that it fools most testers.


DeepMind co-founder Mustafa Suleyman leaves Google

Engadget

Mustafa Suleyman, a co-founder of artificial intelligence research company DeepMind, has left Google to join venture capital firm Greylock Partners. Suleyman has brought to an end an eight-year run at Google, where he was most recently the company's vice president of AI product management and policy. He joined Google when it bought DeepMind in 2014 and became the latter's head of applied AI. Suleyman was reportedly placed on administrative leave in 2019 following allegations that he bullied employees. Suleyman, who moved to Google at the end of that year, said on a podcast with Greylock partner Reid Hoffman this week that he "really screwed up" and that "I remain very sorry about the impact that that caused people and the hurt that people felt there."


Blizzard chief promises to 'rebuild trust' ahead of Microsoft takeover

Engadget

Blizzard Entertainment boss Mike Ybarra has promised in a blog post to "rebuild your trust" in the studio, marking his first comments since Microsoft's proposed $68.7 billion acquisition of Blizzard Activision. The developer of blockbuster titles like World of Warcraft and Overwatch has been under pressure since it was sued by the state of California, which accused it of being a "breeding ground for harassment and discrimination against women." Ybarra promised new measures to improve the company's culture, starting with tying executive and management compensation to "our overall success in creating a safe, inclusive and creative work environment at Blizzard," he said. "A Culture leader who will help us maintain the best aspects of what we have today, and change and evolve where needed to ensure everyone brings their best self to Blizzard; a new organizational leader for Human Resources who will build trust, empower our teams, and help foster a safe, positive work environment for everyone; [and] a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DE&I) leader solely focused on our progress across multiple efforts in this area." We're committed to more open dialog directly with the amazing player communities - not just from me but from all of our incredible teams.