North America Government


Perspecta Labs to Provide Advanced Photonic Edge Artificial Intelligence Compact Hardware Research for DARPA

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Perspecta Inc. announced that its innovative applied research arm, Perspecta Labs, was awarded a prime contract from the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to provide Photonic Edge AI Compact Hardware (PEACH) research under DARPA's Artificial Intelligence (AI) Exploration program. The contract, which represents new work for the company, has a total value of $1 million and work will be performed over 18 months. The goal of the PEACH program is to research and develop novel AI processing architectures in combination with innovative photonic hardware to enable breakthrough AI functionality with significant reduction in hardware complexity, latency and power consumption. Perspecta Labs will create a novel multiple-loop, delay-line reservoir computing architecture, an algorithm for specific emitter identification, and a scalable prototype hardware design in combination with innovative photonic hardware. "Perspecta Labs will draw on its rich portfolio of research and development in AI, photonics, radio frequency (RF) analytics, and systems engineering to deliver this work," said Petros Mouchtaris, Ph.D., president of Perspecta Labs.


Knowledge-Powered Deep Learning for Word Embedding - Semantic Scholar

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The basis of applying deep learning to solve natural language processing tasks is to obtain high-quality distributed representations of words, i.e., word embeddings, from large amounts of text data. However, text itself usually contains incomplete and ambiguous information, which makes necessity to leverage extra knowledge to understand it.


Bernie Sanders wants to ban police use of facial recognition

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Fox News Flash top headlines for August 19 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Bernie Sanders has called for a complete ban on the police use of facial recognition. The Vermont senator's proposal to "ban the use of facial recognition software for policing" is part of his broader criminal justice reform agenda. Facial recognition technology has drawn the ire of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, some of whom have called for a "time out" on its development.


Will we ever control the world with our minds?

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Science-fiction can sometimes be a good guide to the future. In the film Upgrade (2018) Grey Trace, the main character, is shot in the neck. His wife is shot dead. Trace wakes up to discover that not only has he lost his wife, but he now faces a future as a wheelchair-bound quadriplegic. He is implanted with a computer chip called Stem designed by famous tech innovator Eron Keen – any similarity with Elon Musk must be coincidental – which will let him walk again.


How You Can Help Your Agency Put AI to Work Today

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Imagine being alive when the first commercial airline flight was flown or remember the first time you encountered an ATM. At first, these new technologies were cause for caution, and perhaps seemed a bit daunting and maybe even dangerous. After all, they were highly disruptive innovations that dramatically changed how we traveled and accessed our money but eventually, society recognized their benefits. We live in an era when another disruptive tool is on the cusp of transforming our world. Artificial intelligence has shown the potential to be the greatest workforce disruptor since the first industrial revolution.


How 5G can save lives

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AR and thermal imaging in the Qwake C-Thru mask could help firefighters better navigate burning buildings. With smoke, flames and a claustrophobic mask on, running into a burning building is a leap of faith. Firefighters are taught never to leave the wall, because they could become disoriented, run out of air and die. "The way we used to look for people was almost as if you were blind," said Harold Schapelhouman, fire chief of the Menlo Park Fire Protection District. That could change with technology like Qwake's C-Thru.


How A Tip -- And Facial Recognition Technology -- Helped The FBI Catch A Killer

NPR Technology

An FBI agent displays seized firearms from a gang investigation. Digital facial recognition helped the bureau track down an MS-13 member wanted in connection with murder. An FBI agent displays seized firearms from a gang investigation. Digital facial recognition helped the bureau track down an MS-13 member wanted in connection with murder. Walter Yovany-Gomez evaded authorities for years before the FBI put him on its Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.


Biometric Data Regulations: Do Your Insurance Policies Cover This Emerging Risk? JD Supra

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Over the past several years, commercial use of biometric data has become increasingly prevalent. In response, several states have adopted biometric data privacy legislation. Consequently, companies that rely on biometric data face new regulatory risks, in addition to increased legal exposure to individual and class action lawsuits. In fact, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently affirmed certification of a class action alleging Facebook's face-scanning practices violate Illinois' biometric privacy law, finding that the class alleged sufficiently concrete injuries based on Facebook's alleged use of facial recognition technology without users' consent to establish standing. Insurance policies currently available on the market, including cyber insurance policies, may not adequately cover these risks.


Who Is Winning the AI Race: China, the EU or the United States?

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The United States Geological Survey confirmed with the Center for Data Innovation over email on July 22, 2019, that "1-meter DEMs are available or in progress for 45% of the country."


Surveillance cameras in parts of Pennsylvania use hackable Chinese tech and can recognize faces

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Their lifeless eyes peer from building facades, lampposts and streetlight poles. They never sleep, never even blink. And now, enabled by advances in computing power and artificial intelligence, surveillance cameras can do more than just watch. They can recognize, and they can remember. The district attorney for Pennsylvania's second-most-populous county has assembled a network of advanced surveillance cameras in and around Pittsburgh and has enlisted colleagues in four surrounding counties to extend its reach into their jurisdictions.