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AI and computer vision could transform kidney treatment and save NHS millions

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Renal transplantation is widely regarded as the best treatment for patients with end-stage kidney disease. Over the past 15 years, demand in the UK for kidney transplants has been rising, resulting in more elderly deceased donors being considered. The problem with elderly donors is that kidney function deteriorates with age. Kidney transplants from elderly donors are associated with higher risks of early failure. Early failure of a kidney graft is a disastrous outcome for the recipient.


Artificial Intelligence used on Army operation for the first time

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Soldiers from the 20th Armoured Infantry Brigade used an AI engine which provides information on the surrounding environment and terrain. Through the development of significant automation and smart analytics, the engine is able to rapidly cut through masses of complex data. Providing efficient information regarding the environment and terrain, it enables the Army to plan its appropriate activity and outputs. The deployment was a first of its kind for the Army. It built on close collaboration between the MOD and industry partners that developed AI specifically designed for the way the Army is trained to operate.


£36 million boost for AI technologies to revolutionise NHS care

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Thousands of patients and NHS staff will benefit from dozens of new pioneering projects awarded a share of £36 million to test state-of-the-art AI technology. The projects will help the NHS to transform the quality of care and the speed of diagnoses for conditions such as lung cancer. At CogX Festival today (16 June), the Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock announced the winners of the second wave of the NHS AI Lab's AI in Health and Care Award. Already over 17,000 stroke patients and over 25,000 patients with diabetes or high blood pressure have benefited from the first round of the AI in Health and Care Award since September, where £50 million was given to 42 AI technologies. AI has the potential to completely revolutionise every part of how we approach healthcare, from how we diagnose diseases and the speed at which our doctors and nurses deliver treatments to how we support people's mental health.


Patients to get easier access to medical data through NHS App

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Patients are set to get easier access to their medication lists and care plans through the NHS App under the government's new data strategy. New requirements for data sharing across the entire health and care system are also set to come into place, with new legislation to be introduced to require all adult social care providers to provide information about the services they fund. Published today (June 22), the NHSX draft strategy'Data Saves Lives: Reshaping health and social care with data', aims to capitalise on the work undertaken using data during the pandemic to improve health and care services. In a bid to establish openness, the government committed to publishing the first transparency statement setting out how health and care data has been used across the sector by 2022. Under the proposals, patients are set to gain more control over their health data, while data will also be used to improve care and treatment.


NHS to receive £36m injection for AI tech in national health bounce back - CityAM

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The NHS is set to receive a £36m injection to bolster its AI capabilities across 38 new projects designed to make diagnoses faster. While the NHS has been handling the Covid-19 pandemic, concerns over a diagnoses backlog have emerged, with people more hesitant to go to the GP or hospital for check-ups. The new technology will help detect cancers and provide mental health support and form part of the NHS AI Lab's £140m AI in Health and Care award money pot – which will be dished out over three years. Chief executive of NHS England, Simon Stevens, said: "As the NHS comes through the pandemic, rather than a return to old ways, we're supercharging a more innovative future. "So today our message to developers worldwide is clear – the NHS is ready to help you test your innovations and ensure our patients are among the first in the world to benefit from new AI technologies."


UK's ICO warns over 'Big Data' surveillance threat of live facial recognition in public – TechCrunch

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The UK's chief data protection regulator has warned over reckless and inappropriate use of live facial recognition (LFR) in public places. Publishing an opinion today on the use of this biometric surveillance in public -- to set out what is dubbed as the "rules of engagement" -- the information commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, also noted that a number of investigations already undertaken by her office into planned applications of the tech have found problems in all cases. "I am deeply concerned about the potential for live facial recognition (LFR) technology to be used inappropriately, excessively or even recklessly. When sensitive personal data is collected on a mass scale without people's knowledge, choice or control, the impacts could be significant," she warned in a blog post. "Uses we've seen included addressing public safety concerns and creating biometric profiles to target people with personalised advertising. "It is telling that none of the organisations involved in our completed investigations were able to fully justify the processing and, of those systems that went live, none were fully compliant with the requirements of data protection law.


£36 million boost for AI technologies to revolutionise NHS care

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"AI has the potential to completely revolutionise every part of how we approach healthcare, from how we diagnose diseases and the speed at which our doctors and nurses deliver treatments to how we support people's mental health. "The 38 projects we are backing reflect the UK's trailblazing approach to innovation in the healthcare sector, and could help us take a leap forward in the quality of care and the speed of disease diagnoses and treatment in the NHS. "Confronted with this global pandemic, our tech sector has risen to the challenge and upended how we do things through innovations to support people to test from home, complete remote consultations and diagnose issues safely." "Precision cancer diagnosis, accurate surgery, and new ways of offering mental health support are just a few of the promising real world patient benefits. Because as the NHS comes through the pandemic, rather than a return to old ways, we're supercharging a more innovative future. "So today our message to developers worldwide is clear - the NHS is ready to help you test your innovations and ensure our patients are among the first in the world to benefit from new AI technologies." The AI in Health and Care Award aims to accelerate the testing and evaluation of AI in the NHS so patients can benefit from faster and more personalised diagnosis and greater efficiency in screening services. For example, use of Paige Prostate will be able to give more information about prostate cancer, including detecting a tumour, its size and how severe it is, enabling clinicians to make treatment more specific and more targeted. As well as this, Mia by Kheiron Medical, a winner from the first round of the AI Awards, aims to replace the need for two radiologists to review breast cancer scans by instead using one radiologist and the AI, making the process faster and more efficient. "These trials are making the AI revolution a reality for patients.


AI breast cancer screening project wins government funding for NHS trial

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UK researchers have secured government funding to study the use of artificial intelligence for breast cancer screening in NHS hospitals. The work builds on previous research which showed that artificial intelligence could be as effective as human radiologists in spotting breast cancer from X-ray images. Backed by funding through the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award, the next stages of the project aim to further assess the feasibility of the AI system to see how the technology could be integrated into the national screening programme in the future to support clinicians. The partnership, which includes Imperial College London, Google Health, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, St George's Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and the Royal Surrey NHS Foundation Trust builds on previous work, in which the researchers trained the algorithm on depersonalised patient data and mammograms from patients in the UK and US. The findings, published in Nature in January 2020, showed the AI system was able to correctly identify cancers from the images with a similar degree of accuracy to expert radiologists, and demonstrated potential to assist clinical staff in practice.


How computer science is creating a new generation of clinicians

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Eight years ago, Dr Dean Mohamedally, principal teaching fellow at University College London's computer science department, launched a new initiative aimed at ridding computer science programmes of fiction. "It's called the Industry Exchange Network (or IXN): it's a teaching methodology we developed with UCL and Microsoft, whereby we help students to engage with real-world problem-solving," Mohamedally explains. "Computer-science teaching across the country is basically about teaching maths, with very little implementation and activities in the real world. So we set about removing fiction from syllabuses. For instance, if students are learning about data, we give them some synthetic sample data and get them to clean it, make it ready, and see what happens when they use it in a machine learning environment."


The NHS AI iceberg: below the surface

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A new education focus around artificial intelligence for healthcare professionals and patients could be the way forward when it comes to the future of health. Jane Rendall from Sectra and Rachel Dunscombe, CEO of the NHS Digital Academy, explore. A crisis point could be on the horizon for NHS imaging disciplines. Rising demand and pervasive recruitment challenges mean there will be too few experts to go around based on current ways of working. We certainly don't want to reach that point, and to achieve that the health service will need to adopt artificial intelligence in new ways as an important mechanism in redesigning services.