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UK Government


Declaration of the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on Cooperation in Artificial Intelligence Research and Development

#artificialintelligence

Recommending priorities for future cooperation, particularly in R&D areas where each partner shares strong common interest (e.g., interdisciplinary research and intelligent systems) and brings complementary challenges, regulatory or cultural considerations, or expertise to the partnerships; Promoting research and development in AI, focusing on challenging technical issues, and protecting against efforts to adopt and apply these technologies in the service of authoritarianism and repression. We intend to establish a bilateral Government-to-Government dialogue on the areas identified in this vision and explore an AI R&D ecosystem that promotes the mutual wellbeing, prosperity, and security of present and future generations. Signed in London and Washington on 25 September 2020, in two originals, in the English language.


Artificial intelligence and intellectual property: call for views

#artificialintelligence

Intellectual Property rewards people for creativity and innovation. It is crucial to the proper functioning of an innovative economy. The UK is voted one of the best IP environments in the world. To keep it that way we are keen to look ahead to the challenges that new technologies bring. We need to make sure the UK's IP environment is adapted to accommodate them.


How computational modelling is transforming medicine – Physics World

Oxford Comp Sci

Computational modelling has been brought under the spotlight during the COVID-19 pandemic, with scientists trying to predict how the SARS-CoV-2 virus will spread. On 23 March 2020 UK prime minister Boris Johnson announced a lockdown to tackle the spread of coronavirus, following the example of other countries around the world who chose this strategy to halt the virus' progression. This decision came days after Johnson's government toyed with the idea of letting the virus spread and infect up to 70% of the population, in order to develop so-called "herd immunity". The stark policy shift left people wondering what had changed. They predicted that should no action be taken, the death toll in the UK could reach 500,000, and may exceed 2 million in the US.


How Could AI Industry in Britain Be Impacted Post Brexit?

#artificialintelligence

The United Kingdom is already one of the leading countries for AI and is home to some of the world's most advanced AI companies, academics, and research centres. As being said, the nation has the opportunity to be a global leader in AI, but navigating Brexit might be a challenge. On January 31, 2020, the UK formally called off its EU membership in Brussels, with a deal called the withdrawal agreement. However, the deal only set out the process of how the UK would leave the EU. It covers areas, including citizens' rights, info about ways to stop checks along the Irish border, and the UK's financial settlement.


Unraveling the Side-effects of Algorithm

#artificialintelligence

The side-effects of algorithms are perilous as it leads to discrimination and intrudes with privacy and Freedom Of Expression. Infact, it is the logic behind, the Artificial Intelligence. Right from getting recommendation about a particular gadget that we want to buy online to job applications online, algorithms play a major role. And as the competition amongst tech giants are improving, humans are presented with more cutting-edge technology that applies Artificial Intelligence. But algorithms are not new.


AI tech use by NHS to be sped up with £50m investment

#artificialintelligence

NHS patients will benefit from new artificial intelligence (AI) technologies thanks to a £50 million boost. A range of AI-powered innovations which can analyse breast cancer screening scans and assess emergency stroke patients will be tested and scaled. Take-home technology could also see patients given devices and software that can turn their smartphone into a clinical grade medical device for monitoring kidney disease, or a wearable patch to detect irregular heartbeats, one of the leading causes of strokes and heart attacks. The award is managed by the Accelerated Access Collaborative in partnership with NHSX and the National Institute for Health Research. The package also includes funding to support the research, development and testing of promising ideas which could be used in the NHS in future to help speed up diagnosis or improve care for a range of conditions including sepsis, cancer and Parkinson's.


Decoding the Impact of Brexit on Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

With BREXIT, a huge opportunity is provided to the artificial intelligence market of UK for flourishing. With only five weeks left before the United Kingdom and European Union can plan out a strategy that would ensure free trade, the changes with BREXIT are inevitable. The UK is already in a transition period until December 31, 2020, with a looming free trade deal, that will be decision-maker regarding the fate of trade relations between UK and EU. However, with all the unprecedented changes that are involved with BREXIT, technology has been observed as a blooming future. Experts believe that despite the many implications and reformations associated with BREXIT, AI has the potential for revolutionising industry in the near future. The BREXIT is an abbreviation for Britains Exit from European Union.


Big bad data: We don't trust AI to make good decisions

#artificialintelligence

The UK government's recent technological mishaps has seemingly left a bitter taste in the mouth of many British citizens. A new report from the British Computer Society (BCS), the Chartered Institute for IT, has now revealed that more than half of UK adults (53%) don't trust organisations that use algorithms to make decisions about them. The survey, conducted with more than 2,000 respondents, comes in the wake of a tumultuous summer, shaken by student uproar after it emerged that the exam regulator Ofqual used an unfair algorithm to predict A-level and GCSE results, after the COVID-19 pandemic prevented exams from taking place. Ofqual's algorithm effectively based predictions on schools' previous performances, leading to significant downgrades in results that particularly affected state schools, while favoring private schools. The government promptly backtracked and allowed students to adopt teacher-predicted grades rather than algorithm-based results.


Big bad data: We don't trust AI to make good decisions

ZDNet

The UK government's recent technological mishaps has seemingly left a bitter taste in the mouth of many British citizens. A new report from the British Computer Society (BCS), the Chartered Institute for IT, has now revealed that more than half of UK adults (53%) don't trust organisations that use algorithms to make decisions about them. The survey, conducted over 2,000 respondents, comes in the wake of a tumultuous summer, shaken by student uproar after it emerged that the exam regulator Ofqual used an unfair algorithm to predict A-level and GCSE results, after the COVID-19 pandemic prevented exams from taking place. Ofqual's algorithm effectively based predictions on schools' previous performances, leading to significant downgrades in results that particularly affected state schools, while favoring private schools. The government promptly backtracked and allowed students to adopt teacher-predicted grades rather than algorithm-based results.


Digital underclass: why upskilling is crucial for post-COVID future

#artificialintelligence

As companies of all shapes and sizes race to accelerate their digital transformation strategy, one important question weighs heavy: what is the future for the spare humans and how do we prevent the creation of a digital underclass? Just months into the coronavirus pandemic, everyone from chief executives to government ministers and employment charity leaders have seen the impact of digital transformation on people as well as operating models. Last year a report from the Office for National Statistics found that out of the 19.9 million jobs analysed in England in 2017, 1.5 million people were employed in jobs at high risk of automation. That was well before the current expert predictions that the economic fallout of coronavirus could see up to five million people put out of work. Chetan Dube, chief executive at IPsoft, an American multinational focused on artificial intelligence (AI), cognitive and autonomic solutions for enterprises, is well aware of the risks.