UK Government


Artificial intelligence could be used to catch paedophiles prowling on the web

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence could be used to help catch paedophiles operating on the dark web. The technology would target the most dangerous and sophisticated offenders in efforts to tackle child sexual abuse, the Home Office said. Earlier this month Chancellor Sajid Javid announced £30 million would be set aside to tackle online child sexual exploitation. The Government has pledged to spend more money on the Child Abuse Image Database (CAID), which since 2014 has allowed police and other law enforcement agencies to search seized computers and other devices for indecent images of children quickly against a record of 14 million images to help identify victims. The investment will be used to consider whether adding aspects of artificial intelligence (AI) to the system to analyse voices and estimate ages would help in tracking down child abusers.


Home Office to fund use of AI to help catch dark web paedophiles

The Guardian

Artificial intelligence could be used to help catch paedophiles operating on the dark web, the Home Office has announced. The government has pledged to spend more money on the child abuse image database, which since 2014 has allowed police and other law enforcement agencies to search seized computers and other devices for indecent images of children quickly, against a record of 14m images, to help identify victims. The investment will be used to trial aspects of AI including voice analysis and age estimation to see whether they would help track down child abusers. Earlier this month, the chancellor, Sajid Javid, announced £30m would be set aside to tackle online child sexual exploitation, with the Home Office releasing more information on how this would be spent on Tuesday. There has been debate over the use of machine learning algorithms, part of the broad field of AI, with the government's Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation developing a code of practice for the trialling of the predictive analytical technology in policing.


Police officers worry about 'biased' AI data

#artificialintelligence

Police officers have raised concerns about using "biased" artificial-intelligence tools, a report commissioned by one of the UK government's advisory bodies reveals. The study warns such software may "amplify" prejudices, meaning some groups could become more likely to be stopped in the street and searched. It says officers also worry they could become over-reliant on automation. And it says clearer guidelines are needed for facial recognition's use. "The police are concerned that the lack of clear guidance could lead to uncertainty over acceptable uses of this technology," the Royal United Services Institute (Rusi)'s Alexander Babuta told BBC News.


DeepMind, artificial intelligence and the future of the NHS

#artificialintelligence

One morning a few weeks ago Stephen Foot, a warehouseman from Enfield, woke up in a London hospital to discover the unlikely harbinger of a coming medical revolution. This Ghost of Healthcare to Come took the form of a nephrologist at the end of his bed. "That was the last thing I was expecting," he tells me. "Somebody from the renal department to come and say, 'Oh, by the way, there's something going on that has sparked an alert on your kidney.'" Foot had entered hospital because of his foot.


Minister sets out plan for new technologies to transform public services

#artificialintelligence

A plan for how the government can harness new technologies to transform public services has been set out by the Minister for Implementation, Oliver Dowden. In a speech at the start of London Tech Week today (10 June), the Minister launched a new guide to help government embrace artificial intelligence and an online marketplace to support tech start-ups sell to the public sector. These measures accompany a new Technology Innovation Strategy, setting out the government's approach to enabling widespread adoption of new technologies across the public sector. The new AI Guide will be used across government to help departments implement new opportunities for AI, such as how to make cancer diagnosis more reliable and reduce fraud, in an ethical and safe way. The guide also brings together, for the first time, research on how artificial intelligence is already being used by the public sector to save money and improve services.


How can Artificial Intelligence change transformation? [Q&A]

#artificialintelligence

In the same month it was announced that computer pioneer, codebreaker and the father of Artificial Intelligence (AI), Alan Turing, will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's £50 note, a report from IDC suggests that spending across Europe will hit $5.2 billion in 2019 up from 2018 by 49 percent and expected to rise to $13.5bn by 2022. The race to build machines capable of matching and beating human vision, language understanding, intelligence, and movement is on. Change management and business transformation is one area of business operations where AI could make an exciting impact. In this article, three experts share their thoughts to help to better understand what AI is, how much of what we know is real, what it can and should do, and, most importantly, how it might affect business transformation programs around the world. BN: We often see the terms AI mixed with automation, deep learning and machine learning, what do they all mean?


NHS Users Prefer Talking To AI Virtual Assistants Instead Of Humans

#artificialintelligence

The majority of NHS users would rather discuss their hospital and GP appointments with an artificial intelligence service instead of a human. That's according to new research from technology startup EBO.ai, which explores the growing role digital communication tools play in the NHS. It found that more than three quarters (76%) of NHS users would be happy to receive automated reminders from an AI-powered virtual assistant, compared to the 58% who'd rather interact with a human. Figures from NHS England claim that missed appointments cost the health service over £216 million annually, and many people believe that AI technology could help minimize this cost. Dr. Gege Gatt, CEO of EBO.ai, said: "The NHS has already invested millions in the latest technologies, but the enormous potential of AI remains largely untapped. "The adoption we have seen thus far has focused on primary patient care including assessment and diagnosis, but AI can improve patient experiences outside the treatment room too." "Virtual assistants help patients manage their care 24/7, with no need to wait for opening hours or spend time on hold in a phone queue.


Siri, sex and Apple's privacy problem

The Guardian

As Apple prepares to launch a new iPhone, Alex Hern explores the privacy scandal around its automated personal assistant, Siri.


Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

The majority of NHS users would rather discuss their hospital and GP appointments with an artificial intelligence service instead of a human. That's according to new research from technology startup EBO.ai, which explores the growing role digital communication tools play in the NHS. It found that more than three quarters (76%) of NHS users would be happy to receive automated reminders from an AI-powered virtual assistant, compared to the 58% who'd rather interact with a human. Figures from NHS England claim that missed appointments cost the health service over £216 annually, and many people believe that AI technology could help minimize this cost. Dr. Gege Gatt, CEO of EBO.ai, said: "The NHS has already invested millions in the latest technologies, but the enormous potential of AI remains largely untapped. "The adoption we have seen thus far has focused on primary patient care including assessment and diagnosis, but AI can improve patient experiences outside the treatment room too." "Virtual assistants help patients manage their care 24/7, with no need to wait for opening hours or spend time on hold in a phone queue.


NHS places £130m bet on AI to treat debilitating conditions

#artificialintelligence

The government will look to artificial intelligence (AI) to diagnose and treat long-term life-threatening conditions like cancer and Parkinson's with a financial package worth £133 million. Five Centres of Excellence, located in major cities across the UK, will use a £50 million fund to support existing work in digital pathology and imaging powered by AI. These facilities, which were established in November last year, can also partner with more NHS Trusts to design products based on the digital systems the centres are currently developing. The work predominantly involves improving the speed and accuracy of diagnostics as well as early intervention treatment. The centres themselves are based in Leeds, Oxford, Coventry, Glasgow and London.