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#NewProfilePic: Warning issued over viral app which hoovers data and sends it to Moscow

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new phone app which offers users a free digital avatar is taking facial-recognition quality photographs and sending them to Moscow, prompting major concerns within the cyber security community. Tens of thousands of people have already uploaded their photographs to the servers of the New Profile Pic app in return to the free avatar. However, many will be unaware that the company behind the app, Linerock Investments, is based in an apartment complex overlooking the Moscow River, beside Russia's Ministry of Defence and just three miles from Red Square. Jake Moore, Global Cybersecurity Advisor, ESET Internet Security told MailOnline that people have to be incredibly careful when uploading photographs or personal data to a brand new website. He said: 'This app is likely a way of capturing people's faces in high resolution and I would question any app wanting this amount of data, especially one which is largely unheard of and based in another country.'


Ukraine says drone destroyed Russian landing ship near Snake Island

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Ukraine's defense ministry on Saturday claimed it had sunk a Russian Serna-class landing boat off of the now-famous Snake Island which has stood as a symbol of resistance since the beginning of the war. Undated video footage posted to social media appears to show an airstrike hitting a landing vessel that had soldiers on board. Spokesman for the Odesa Regional Military Administration, Serhii Bratchuk, told Ukrainian news outlet Pravda that Zmiinyi Island – also known as Snake Island – has become "a symbol of our rock-hard endurance and our ability to shatter the enemy's most persistent efforts."


Small Drones Are Giving Ukraine an Unprecedented Edge

WIRED

In the snowy streets of the north Ukrainian town of Trostyanets, the Russian missile system fires rockets every second. Tanks and military vehicles are parked on either side of the blasting artillery system, positioned among houses and near the town's railway system. The weapon is not working alone, though. Hovering tens of meters above it and recording the assault is a Ukrainian drone. The drone isn't a sophisticated military system, but a small, commercial machine that anyone can buy.


Chernobyl scientists want robots and drones to monitor radiation risk

New Scientist

Drones and robots could form part of a new radiation-monitoring system at the Chernobyl power station in Ukraine, as scientists at the plant fear that existing sensor networks built after the nuclear accident in 1986 have been at least partially destroyed by Russian troops. When Russia seized the Chernobyl plant in February, the sensors monitoring gamma radiation levels quickly went offline and most remained that way.


Ukraine's Digital Battle With Russia Isn't Going as Expected

WIRED

When Russian president Vladimir Putin launched his full invasion of Ukraine in February, the world expected Moscow's cyber and information operations to pummel the country alongside air strikes and shelling. Two months on, however, Kyiv has not only managed to keep the country online amidst a deluge of hacking attempts, but it has brought the fight back to Russia. Even Ukrainian officials are surprised by how ineffective Russia's digital war has been. "I think that the root cause of this is the difference between our systems," says Mykhailo Fedorov, Ukraine's 31-year-old minister for digital transformation. "Because the Russian system is centralized. And it leads to the scale of corruption and graft that is becoming increasingly apparent as the war continues."


Chinese Drone Giant DJI Suspends Business in Russia, Ukraine

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

HONG KONG--China's SZ DJI Technology Co., the world's largest maker of consumer drones, said it is suspending business activities in Ukraine and Russia pending a compliance review. The disclosure by the Shenzhen-based company follows complaints from Ukrainian officials of technical glitches in its products that they said appeared to aid Russia's military activities in the country. DJI has said that it never tampered with its products and that it was trying to fix the malfunction problems.


Chinese drone giant DJI suspends business in Russia, Ukraine

Al Jazeera

DJI, the world's largest drone manufacturer, has announced it is temporarily halting operations in Russia and Ukraine, in a rare example of a Chinese firm suspending business in response to the war in Ukraine. The Shenzhen-headquartered company said on Wednesday it would suspend its business in the two countries while "internally reassessing compliance requirements in various jurisdictions". DJI, which was founded in Hong Kong in 2006, added it was "engaging with customers, partners and other stakeholders regarding the temporary suspension," according to a company statement. Adam Lisberg, DJI's director of corporate communications for North America, told Al Jazeera the company had taken the action "not to make a statement about any country, but to make a statement about our principles". "DJI abhors any use of our drones to cause harm, and we are temporarily suspending sales in these countries in order to help ensure no one uses our drones in combat," Lisberg said.


Is science fiction or reality? Is Russia using artificial intelligence weapons in Ukraine?

#artificialintelligence

The drone, loaded with explosives, crashed without exploding, crashing its nose into its stomach like a dead fish, twisting its rear propeller and crashing or firing. Initially overthrown by Ukrainian forces. The image of the plane quickly spread on social media, and armament experts have identified it as the "KUB-BLA" model produced by Russian arms manufacturer Kalashnikov's drone division "Sala Aero", colloquially known as the "Comics Drone". It can fly spontaneously to a specific area and then hover around it for up to 30 minutes before exploding itself, like a suicide bomber does. The most advanced Comicase suicide planes today belong to the category of weapons known as automatic weapons, and are considered by experts to be the third revolution in the world of war after gunpowder and nuclear weapons. The evolution from landmines to guided missiles was a precursor to true AI-powered autonomy.


Russia's Artificial Intelligence Boom May Not Survive the War

#artificialintelligence

The last year was a busy one for Russia's military and civilian artificial intelligence efforts. Moscow poured money into research and development, and Russia's civil society debated the country's place in the larger AI ecosystem. But Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine in February and the resulting sanctions have brought several of those efforts to a halt--and thrown into question just how many of its AI advancements Russia will be able to salvage and continue. Ever since Putin extolled the development of robotic combat systems in the new State Armaments Program in 2020, the Russian Ministry of Defense has been hyper-focused on AI. We have learned more about the Russian military's focus on AI in the past year thanks to several public revelations.


How the Ukraine-Russian Conflict Impacts Cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

With global conflict comes a whole slew of negative aspects. Many Americans wonder how the Russian invasion of Ukraine will impact our domestic security. While it's very unlikely that we'll see war on our sovereign land, there is a potential for cyber warfare between NATO and Russia. War is no longer about brute force, as countries typically utilize technology to get an edge on their enemies. Here's how the Ukraine-Russian conflict impacts cybersecurity in America and worldwide to better prepare you for what's to come.