Europe Government


UK and France agree artificial intelligence tie-up

@machinelearnbot

Ministers have agreed a technology tie-up with Emmanuel Macron's government that will see the UK unite with France in areas such as artificial intelligence and cyber security. Matt Hancock, the Culture Secretary, will this morning announce the two countries plan to work together to pool industry and academic research. Britain and France will host a conference later this year to encourage cross-Channel investment, targeting work on AI in particular. It comes as France's new government tries to shake off its reputation for protectionism and onerous employment rules that has held back start-ups in the country and seen Paris lose out to London as a tech hub. Last year more venture capital deals were signed involving French tech companies than British ones, the first time this has happened in half a decade, although the UK raises far more money in total and dominates rankings of European "unicorns", start-ups with valuations of more than $1bn (£720m).


UK And France Pledge To Bolster Tech & AI Links

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The government wants to establish a leading position in Europe as a tech finance and AI leader, with the news that it will strengthen links with France in the tech and artificial intelligence sectors. The cross channel collaboration has seen both countries agree to a digital conference later this year to promote deeper integration in the digital economy. It comes as the UK undertakes a charm offensive with the French in an effort to gain its support for a positive Brexit deal. For many years now the United Kingdom has been the top country in Europe for global tech investors. Indeed, its tech firms have attracted more venture capital funding than any other European country in 2017.


AI vs electricity: The AI startup playbook – Towards Data Science

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Michael Faraday is feeling good -- he's tinkering about with electromagnetic induction. William Gladstone, the Chancellor of the Exchequer (CFO of the British government) shows up in his lab and asks, "Electricity. What is it good for?" to which Faraday responded, "One day sir, you may tax it." This is a cute story, but not true. The data science community hunting for'machine learning use cases' reminds me of the Chancellor's question.


The firms that will win in battle of man vs machine - Independent.ie

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The surge in robot sales has seen the emergence of four major suppliers, two Japanese, Fanuc and Yaskawa, a Swiss/Swedish concern ABB and Germany's Kuka AG. The rise in robot demand has coincided with a jump in their share prices. Kuka made the news last year not because its robots were building Tesla and Porsche cars, but for its €4.5bn takeover by the Chinese appliance company Medea, which hopes to build small mobile robots for the home and consumer industry. However, the German government was unhappy with the takeover. While it has a right to block any non-EU company from acquiring more than a 25pc stake in any German entity, it is limited to public order being endangered or national security.


Cisco collaborates with startup for AI health and safety trial

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Artificial intelligence (AI) will in future be used to help reduce human error in physical safety in workplaces such as laboratories, operating theatres or building sites, pending the results of a UK government-funded trial of AI and video networking technology. Check out the latest findings on how the hype around artificial intelligence could be sowing damaging confusion. Also, read a number of case studies on how enterprises are using AI to help reach business goals around the world. You forgot to provide an Email Address. This email address doesn't appear to be valid.


Cisco collaborates with startup for AI health and safety trial

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) will in future be used to help reduce human error in physical safety in workplaces such as laboratories, operating theatres or building sites, pending the results of a UK government-funded trial of AI and video networking technology. Every conference this year contains a dead human genius reincarnated as software system or a robot. Yes, there is a lot of hype, but there is real worth in AI and Machine Learning. Read our counseling on how to avoid adopting "black box" approach. You forgot to provide an Email Address.


Startup Republic: How France reinvented itself for the 21st century by wooing entrepreneurs to Paris

ZDNet

This article was originally published as a TechRepublic cover story. The elegant Hôtel de Ville--the center of politics in Paris for nearly 700 years--has witnessed plenty of fancy receptions. But tonight's event is among the more unusual that the opulent Renaissance city hall has hosted. Above soars a ceiling crammed with gilt decoration and paintings, separated by the words liberté, égalité, fraternité, plus half a dozen blazing chandeliers. The crowd--with as many dressed in hoodies and trainers as there are in suits and ties--are munching on crickets along with more standard canapés.


Opening banking data and APIs: Land of opportunity or Pandora's box?

ZDNet

PSD2 stands for second payment standards directive, and was issued by the EU with the intent to open access to data and services previously only available to banks. In theory, PSD2 went into effect on January 13, and should provide a clear framework for implementation. The difference between theory and practice is small in theory, but big in practice. PSD2 is defined in a set of documents published by the EU, which are to be subsequently implemented as legislation by parliaments in EU countries and enforced by regulating bodies. PSD2 will effectively force financial institutions active in the EU to open up data and functionality previously only available to them to other parties.


'Roads for the Future': The UK's infrastructure transformation

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In last November's Autumn Budget, Chancellor Philip Hammond announced sweeping regulatory reforms, which he suggested will put the UK at the forefront of a post-Brexit technological revolution. To help realise this vision, the UK Government is offering rewards to individuals and teams that can develop ways to make the country's infrastructure ready for new developments, like electric and autonomous cars. The'Roads for the Future' competition, launched by Highways England and the National Infrastructure Commission (NIC), is offering £200,000 to people who can create and implement ways to adapt existing roads to fit these new technologies. The competition is particularly looking for ideas that can work on different types of roads (motorways, country lanes, etc). It is also looking at ways to ensure the safety of autonomous vehicles.


Tech predictions for 2018: Drones, crypto, and the rise of the robots

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The pace of technological change can seem exciting and daunting in equal measure. From Amazon to Uber, tech giants saw their practices and business models scrutinised more deeply than ever before, while regulators sought to get their arms around a rapidly evolving "new economy", driven by disruptive technology. While we can only guess at what's around the corner, here are five things to watch out for this year. Read more: A robot tax won't fix our public funding crisis Machine learning comprises a key component of artificial intelligence whose use is set to grow. Many businesses, especially consumer-facing ones that analyse data (think Google Translate), will start to deploy it, with high-end smartphones being a good example of where we can expect continued early adoption.