Europe Government


EU Parliament Votes to Control AI – but not to rescue those who lose their jobs to robots - Netopia

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MEPs have approved rules for keeping humans firmly in charge of Artificial Intelligence (AI). They have also called for ethical standards to be built in to AI algorithms and robots that work for humans, and standardisation across Member States to ensure a level playing field for technology companies. The people of Europe can also have a say: Parliament's Legal Affairs committee has opened an online public consultation that lasts until the end of April 2017. In my interview with her, Rapporteur Mady Delvaux Sèhres insists that MEPs are not trying to stop technological advances nor stifle innovation: "The European Parliament thinks there should be ethics by design… I understand that it will be difficult and time consuming but Parliament hopes by standardisation to prevent unethical robots from coming to the market" Delvaux's committee has developed ethical principles relating to human rights to safety, privacy, integrity, dignity, autonomy and data ownership They include creating legal liability and insurance for driverless vehicles and compensation for victims when they go wrong.


'My fingers were almost cut off by a drone'

BBC News

On Saturday, the government announced plans to introduce drone registration and safety awareness courses for owners of drones. Commenting on the new government plans, he added: "I think it's a good idea because we shouldn't have them in wrong hands. Last November, two orb-shaped drones got as close as 500m to a passenger jet flying into Heathrow Airport. Thirty minutes after the incident, another passenger jet approaching Heathrow flew within just 50m of what is believed to have been one of the drones.


The House of Lords is going to carry out a public inquiry into artificial intelligence

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The House of Lords has launched a public inquiry into advances in the field of artificial intelligence (AI). The House of Lords said on Wednesday that the new Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence will "consider the economic, ethical, and social implications of advances in artificial intelligence." AI is set to bring about major changes to the way humans live and work. Well-known scientists and entrepreneurs such as Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk have warned about the potential dangers superintelligent AI presents.


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Mashable

On Saturday, the UK government posted new rules governing the use of drones weighing over 250 grams (about half a pound), with input from the Department for Transport, the Civil Aviation Authority, and the Military Aviation Authority. The guidelines state that drone users will have to register their devices and undergo safety awareness testing to ensure that they're aware of UK security, privacy, and safety rules. "By registering drones, introducing safety awareness tests to educate users we can reduce the inadvertent breaching of airspace restrictions." "By registering drones, introducing safety awareness tests to educate users we can reduce the inadvertent breaching of airspace restrictions to protect the public."


Drones will have to be registered in UK safety clampdown

The Guardian

Drones will have to be registered and users forced to take a safety awareness test under new regulations announced by the UK government. The move follows research that showed strikes by drones of more than 400g could critically damage helicopter windscreens, while a bigger drone of about 2kg could critically harm airliner windscreens at higher speeds. It said the research tests, conducted on behalf of Balpa along with the government and military aviation authorities, showed that the impact of drones hitting aircraft windscreens and helicopter rotors could be catastrophic even at modest speeds with small drones. Commercial drone operators are already obliged to complete a training course and register their drones with the CAA.


House of Lords launches artificial intelligence inquiry » Banking Technology

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Is the current level of excitement surrounding AI warranted? The UK's House of Lords wants you to come clean on the rise of the machines – with a call for feedback on the economic, ethical and social implications of artificial intelligence (AI). The House of Lords Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence (AI) is asking for contributions to its inquiry and is looking for pragmatic solutions to the issues presented, and questions raised by the development and use of AI in the present and the future. Some of its questions include the current state of AI; development over the next five to 20 years; regulations; and whether the current level of excitement surrounding AI is warranted.


Lords to probe ethics of artificial intelligence

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The House of Lords Select Committee on artificial intelligence (AI) has called for academia, industry, technologists and the general public to have their say on the ethical, social and economic impact of advances in AI. You forgot to provide an Email Address. By submitting your personal information, you agree that TechTarget and its partners may contact you regarding relevant content, products and special offers. These include how the general public can be prepared for widespread adoption of AI, and the impact on everyday life, jobs, education and skills – as well as democracy, cyber security, privacy and data ownership; how AI can best be managed so it does not benefit one group in society over others; which industries are set to benefit most from AI, what barriers exist to its adoption; how to avoid data-based monopolies; the role of the government in supporting AI; and ethical issues around privacy, consent, safety, diversity and transparency.


Dogs Have Same Genes As Williams Beuren Syndrome Patients, And That Makes Them Friendly, Study Finds

International Business Times

The study found that hyper-social canines carry variants of the genes GTF2I and GTF2IRD1, the deletion of which, in humans, triggers the Williams-Beuren Syndrome, or more commonly known as the Williams syndrome. The National Organization for Rare Disorders characterizes WBS as a "rare genetic disorder characterized by growth delays before and after birth (prenatal and postnatal growth retardation), short stature, a varying degree of mental deficiency, and distinctive facial features that typically become more pronounced with age." "This exciting observation highlights the utility of the dog as a genetic system informative for studies of human disease, as it shows how minor variants in critical genes in dogs result in major syndromic effects in humans," she said, BBC reported. In this handout image provided by Kensington Palace, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge pose for a photograph with their son, Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge, surrounded by Lupo, the couple's cocker spaniel, and Tilly the retriever (a Middleton family pet) in the garden of the Middleton family home in Bucklebury, Berkshire, England, in Aug. 2013.


UK government launches artificial intelligence inquiry

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Facebook showed off some artificial intelligence at its F8 event. The United Kingdom's government has some questions about artificial intelligence. On Wednesday, the House of Lords announced a public call for experts to weigh in on issues surrounding AI, including its ethical, economic and social effects as the technology becomes more prevalent. "The Committee wants to use this inquiry to understand what opportunities may exist for society in the development and use of artificial intelligence, as well as what risks there might be," Lord Clement-Jones, chairman of the committee on AI, said in a statement.


AI data-monopoly risks to be probed by UK parliamentarians

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The committee says it is looking for "pragmatic solutions to the issues presented, and questions raised by the development and use of artificial intelligence in the present and the future". The risk of data-based monopolies and'winner-takes-all' economics from big tech's big data push to garner AI advantage should be loud and clear. In another twist pertaining to DeepMind Health's activity in the UK, the country's data protection watchdog ruled earlier this month that the company's first data-sharing arrangement with an NHS Trust broke UK privacy law. Patients' consent had not been sought nor obtained for the sharing of some 1.6 million medical records for the purpose of co-developing a clinical task management app to provide alerts of the risk of a patient developing a kidney condition.