Europe Government


Sir Michael Barber on getting ready for 21st century government

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The last time I sat down to interview Sir Michael Barber, the world looked and felt a very different place. Even a few years ago, Donald Trump's tweets were making international headlines, Brexit had its supporters and detractors, and North Korea was an unpredictable rogue state harbouring nuclear ambitions. And just like today, governments the world over were striving to gain control over a fast-changing environment pock-marked by new technologies, diverse policy approaches and different ways to improve public impact. But of course, some changes are hard to miss. Artificial intelligence (AI), for example, is fast moving from concept to reality.


'Connected' cars are hitting UK roads for the first time

Engadget

Slowly, the UK government is realising its dream of making the nation a self-driving research hub. UK Autodrive, a publicly funded consortium that includes Jaguar Land Rover, Ford and TATA Motors, has announced a new set of trials in Coventry today. They will focus on self-driving cars and vehicles that can instantly share information with other motorists and city infrastructure. Researchers will be testing a signal, for instance, that can be sent out by the emergency services -- ambulances, fire trucks and police cars -- to nearby drivers, advising them when and where to move aside. Other test features include a warning signal for intersections deemed too unsafe to cross, in-car information about accidents and traffic jams (negating the need for signs on bridges) and an alert system when a driver in front suddenly hits the brakes (the idea being that this can be hard to spot in rain and fog).


The future of government is digital - Raconteur

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At this year's Notting Hill Carnival, the Metropolitan Police used facial recognition technology for the first time. Paul Wiles, the biometrics commissioner, reported that it was a test to see how the technology performed in such a bustling scenario. In theory, police records of 20 million faces can be cross-referenced with other crime data to identify likely offenders. It's just the latest use of artificial intelligence (AI) in government. In fact, we are seeing an explosion in new tech across the public sphere.


Q&A: Google on Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

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There's no question that ad tech company Google are making some significant movements in the digital advertising space, most notably on the integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning. Jennifer Prior, lead of agency UK at Google, presented this at Thursday's (November 9) digital advertising conference, hosted by Independent PPC and digital agency Search Star, which emphasised the importance of advertisers moving away from manual tasks and letting machines complete the data collecting in an increasingly saturated market. With the move of automation across internal projects growing, how can advertisers best utilise this technology to improve ad performance and targeted campaigns? Fresh from her session at the Search Star conference, PerformanceIN caught up with Prior for her take on how advertisers can use AI and Machine Learning to engage more with customers and overcome certain challenges along the way. Jennifer Prior: I'm on the UK agency team and what we do is partner with UK leading agencies across the country and help them to effectively support their advertisers.


AI GDPR Compliance Reassurance

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The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the European Union's sweeping new data privacy law, is triggering a lot of sleepless nights for CIOs grappling with how to effectively comply with the new regulations and help their organizations avoid potentially hefty penalties. The GDPR, which goes into effect May 25, 2018, requires all companies that collect data on citizens in EU countries to provide a "reasonable" level of protection for personal data. The ramifications for non-compliance are significant, with fines of up to 4% of a firm's global revenues. Companies that do business in Europe have been scrambling to put new processes and platforms in place to improve data security and facilitate GDPR compliance at a time when data volumes are exploding across legacy IT and multi-cloud environments. A logical starting point for GDPR compliance, therefore, is a full understanding of where data is stored and how it is used.


Paradise Papers explained: Offshore assets of Apple, Queen Elizabeth II, others exposed in historical data leak

FOX News

The bombshell Paradise Papers are reportedly implicating key members of the Trump administration. On Nov. 5, one of the largest data leaks in history revealed the offshore endeavors of some of the world's most influential people. Here's what you need to know about the Paradise Papers, so named because many of the offshore assets are held in tropical places like Bermuda. The Paradise Papers refers to a trove of 13.4 million documents that expose the offshore assets of some of the world's biggest companies such as Nike, Apple, and Uber. The leak, which is one of the biggest in history and comes about 18 months after the Panama Papers leak, exposes how these companies and individuals "avoid taxes through increasingly imaginative bookkeeping maneuvers," according to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, a global network of more than 200 investigative journalists in 70 countries who collaborate on in-depth investigative stories, according to its website, which has access to the documents.


Time Is Right To Capitalise On Artificial Intelligence

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Just weeks after the publication of the UK government's review of the country's capabilities in artificial intelligence, Southampton Professor Dame Wendy Hall, co-chair of the review, says the time is right to capitalise while the time is right. Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been around for a long time as a concept but in reality, we're now seeing a major surge in the technological development of AI which is likely to see automation continue to escalate and accelerate. The machines we're building today are so much more powerful than ever before in terms of their processing power and storage ability, and because of the huge amounts of data available, we've vastly improved our capacity to build intelligent systems that can learn and begin to'think' for themselves, although it's still an open question as to whether they will ever really be able to outperform the human brain. As a result, we're seeing a huge surge in automation in every walk of life which places even greater importance on the recently-published government review of Artificial Intelligence in the UK which I co-chaired alongside Jérôme Pesenti, Chief Executive of BenevolentTech. But we now need to act in order to realise the full potential of AI and achieve the positive benefits it can deliver.


Stephen Hawking says A.I. could be 'worst event in the history of our civilization'

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Hawking explained that to avoid this potential reality, creators of AI need to "employ best practice and effective management." The scientist highlighted some of the legislative work being carried out in Europe, particularly proposals put forward by lawmakers earlier this year to establish new rules around AI and robotics. Members of the European Parliament said European Union-wide rules were needed on the matter. Such developments are giving Hawking hope. "I am an optimist and I believe that we can create AI for the good of the world.


Robots in Finance Bring New Risks to Stability, Regulators Warn

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Banks and hedge funds that rely on artificial intelligence threaten to inject risks into the financial system that could exacerbate a future crisis, according to global regulators. The financial industry's rush to adopt AI raises the potential that firms will become overly dependent on technologies that herd them toward the same view of risks and could "amplify financial shocks," according to a study published on Wednesday by the Financial Stability Board, a panel of regulators that includes the U.S. Federal Reserve and European Central Bank. "AI and machine learning applications show substantial promise if their specific risks are properly managed," the FSB said in a report that called for additional monitoring and testing of robotic technologies designed to lessen human involvement. "Taken as a group, universal banks' vulnerability to systemic shocks may grow if they increasingly depend on similar algorithms or data streams." The FSB, headed by Bank of England Governor Mark Carney, said that many of the technologies are being designed and tested in a period of low volatility in financial markets, and, as a result, "may not suggest optimal actions in a significant economic downturn or in a financial crisis."


Robots in Finance Bring New Risks to Stability, Regulators Warn

#artificialintelligence

Banks and hedge funds that rely on artificial intelligence threaten to inject risks into the financial system that could exacerbate a future crisis, according to global regulators. The financial industry's rush to adopt AI raises the potential that firms will become overly dependent on technologies that herd them toward the same view of risks and could "amplify financial shocks," according to a study published on Wednesday by the Financial Stability Board, a panel of regulators that includes the U.S. Federal Reserve and European Central Bank. "AI and machine learning applications show substantial promise if their specific risks are properly managed," the FSB said in a report that called for additional monitoring and testing of robotic technologies designed to lessen human involvement. "Taken as a group, universal banks' vulnerability to systemic shocks may grow if they increasingly depend on similar algorithms or data streams." The FSB, headed by Bank of England Governor Mark Carney, said that many of the technologies are being designed and tested in a period of low volatility in financial markets, and, as a result, "may not suggest optimal actions in a significant economic downturn or in a financial crisis."