Middle East Government


Xiaomi, Aramco Will Likely List in Hong Kong, Exchange Chief Says

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The proposed changes include permitting IPOs that restrict shareholders' voting rights, secondary listings by Chinese and international companies already listed elsewhere and primary listings by unprofitable biotech firms. The reforms are set to become effective April 30. The exchange will begin taking listing applications in early May, Mr. Li said. "This probably is the largest reform we've ever had in the last 25 years," he said, adding that it's "only a matter of time" before the likes of Alibaba and Xiaomi list in Hong Kong. Mr. Li is one of several speakers who are discussing some of the most compelling ideas emerging globally.


Israel hints it could hit Iran's 'air force' in Syria

The Japan Times

JERUSALEM – Israel released details on Tuesday about what it described as an Iranian "air force" deployed in neighboring Syria, including civilian planes suspected of transferring arms, a signal that these could be attacked should tensions with Tehran escalate. Iran, along with Damascus and its big-power backer Russia, blamed Israel for an April 9 airstrike on a Syrian air base, T-4, that killed seven Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) members. Iranian officials have promised unspecified reprisals. Israeli media ran satellite images and a map of five Syrian air bases allegedly used to field Iranian drones or cargo aircraft, as well as the names of three senior IRGC officers suspected of commanding related projects, such as missile units. The information came from the Israeli military, according to a wide range of television and radio stations and news websites.


Yemen's Houthis Say Launched Drone Attack on Southern Saudi Aramco Facility

U.S. News

"The air force announced the execution of air strikes with the Qasif 1 aircraft on Aramco in Jizan (province)," the channel said on its official Twitter account, referring to a drone the Houthis had previously unveiled.


Iran Threatens Israel Over Airstrike in Syria

NYT > Middle East

A senior Iranian foreign policy official warned Israel on Tuesday that its strike on an air base in Syria that killed several Iranians would "not remain without a response," the Lebanese news channel Al Mayadeen reported. Seven Iranian military personnel were killed on Monday in the strike on the Tiyas, or T4, air base near Homs, according to the Iranian news agency Tasnim. The semiofficial Fars news agency initially said that three were members of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, but the report was later withdrawn without explanation. Syria, Iran and Russia have accused Israel of mounting the attack, though Israel has neither confirmed nor denied involvement. Israel has carried out several strikes in Syria in the past, some aimed at stopping what it says is a military buildup by Iran and its regional ally, Hezbollah, along the Syrian-Israeli border.


At Gaza Fence, Violence Fades as Israel Warns of Broader Response

NYT > Middle East

Palestinian health officials said 15 Palestinians were killed by Israeli fire and more than 750 hit by live rounds Friday, making it the bloodiest day in Gaza since the 2014 cross-border war between Israel and Hamas. In Friday's confrontations, large crowds gathered near the fence, with smaller groups of protesters rushing forward, throwing stones and burning tires. Israeli troops responded with live fire and rubber-coated steel pellets, while drones dropped tear gas from above. Gen. Ronen Manelis, said that while thousands of Palestinians approached the border Friday, those engaged in stone-throwing were in the hundreds. General Manelis denied soldiers used excessive force, saying those killed by Israeli troops were men between the ages of 18 and 30 who were involved in violence and belonged to militant factions.


MIT hosts Saudi-U.S. innovation forum

MIT News

MIT on Saturday hosted an "Innovation to Impact" forum focused on Saudi Arabia, bringing together governmental leaders, business executives, and academic researchers in an effort to analyze and catalyze new directions for the Saudi economy and to discuss areas of shared interest. The event's participants included a royal delegation from Saudi Arabia, members of the MIT administration and faculty, and chief executives from several prominent Boston–area companies. Among the other components of the forum, separate, simultaneous roundtable discussions examined the state of health care, renewable energy, and the dynamics of entrepreneurship and venture capital. At the conclusion of the forum, MIT hosted an event in the MIT Media Lab that featured an "innovation gallery" of new technologies; presentations by Greater Boston students and scientists from Saudi Arabia; and demonstrations of new technologies. His Royal Highness Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in that second event, which included a signing ceremony to finalize a series of research and education collaborations with MIT and other area institutions.


AI News: Artificial Intelligence Surging Interest For Big Oil Companies Stock News & Stock Market Analysis - IBD

#artificialintelligence

Tech giants Apple (AAPL), Alphabet (GOOGL), Facebook (FB), and Microsoft (MSFT) have raced to apply artificial intelligence to their businesses, and the oil industry is starting to seize on AI's benefits too. The reason interest is surging now is because artificial intelligence is "actually doable," he said in an interview with IBD at CERAWeek, explaining that advancements in cloud computing and infrastructure have made AI more affordable and accessible. "The industrial world is waking up to best practices," he said. "They are all waking up to it." Several heavyweights in the energy industry are already investors in his company, including General Electric (GE), Chevron (CVX), Royal Dutch Shell (RDSA) and Saudi Aramco.


Governments must control the rise of artificial intelligence, experts say

#artificialintelligence

The dawn of the artificial intelligence age is upon us and the speed of technological development threatens to leave regulatory control in its wake.