Asia Government


FogHorn Augments Edge Computing With Machine Learning To Bring Intelligence To Industrial IoT

#artificialintelligence

FogHorn, a Silicon Valley-based startup, is one of the early movers in the IIoT and edge computing market. The company has raised a total of $47.5M in funding over four rounds. The latest funding came from a Series B round in October 2017 by Intel Capital and Saudi Aramco Energy Ventures. Founded in 2014, FogHorn has been squarely focused on edge analytics and edge intelligence. According to the company, its solution enables high-performance edge processing, optimized analytics, and heterogeneous applications to be hosted as close as possible to the control systems and physical sensor infrastructure that pervade the industrial world.


Twitter data could have been a source of Kremlin intelligence during the 2014 Ukraine conflict

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Kremlin analysts could have used Twitter as a source of military intelligence to inform their actions in the 2014 Russia–Ukraine conflict, a study has found. University of California experts showed that location-tagged tweets by Ukraine residents could have been used to map out sentiments towards Russia in real-time. The map they made of pro-Kremlin regions turned out to bear a striking resemblance to the actual areas to which Russia dispatched its special forces. Specifically, this included Crimea and regions in the far east of Ukraine -- where the incoming forces would have been most likely to be seen as liberators. In contrast, the data could also reveal those areas where dispatching forces would have lead to greater resistance and corresponding casualties and costs.


Iran MP offers $3 million 'to anyone who kills Trump': report

The Japan Times

TEHRAN – An Iranian lawmaker on Tuesday offered a $3 million reward to "anyone who kills" U.S. President Donald Trump to avenge the assassination of a top general, the semi-official news agency ISNA reported. Ahmad Hamzeh, a little-known member of the Majlis, made the offer on behalf of the people of Kerman, the hometown and final resting place of storied commander, Qassem Soleimani. "We will give $3 million to anyone who kills Trump," Hamzeh, who represents Kahnouj county near the southeastern city of Kerman, was quoted as saying by ISNA. He did not say who would pay the bounty offer, which comes a month ahead of a parliamentary election. Soleimani, one of the most popular public figures in Iran, was killed on Jan. 3 in a U.S. drone strike outside Baghdad airport.


Whoever leads in artificial intelligence in 2030 will rule the world until 2100

#artificialintelligence

A couple of years ago, Vladimir Putin warned Russians that the country that led in technologies using artificial intelligence will dominate the globe. He was right to be worried. Russia is now a minor player, and the race seems now to be mainly between the United States and China. But don't count out the European Union just yet; the EU is still a fifth of the world economy, and it has underappreciated strengths. Technological leadership will require big digital investments, rapid business process innovation, and efficient tax and transfer systems.


U.S. and Iraq resume joint military ops after Soleimani killiing

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – The United States on Wednesday resumed joint military operations with Iraq that had been put on pause after the U.S. drone strike that killed a top Iranian general in Baghdad, The New York Times reported. Two U.S. military officials quoted by the paper said the Pentagon wanted to resume these operations in order to pick up the fight against the Islamic State group. Washington began the pause on January 5 two days after the strike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani at the Baghdad airport. The same day of the suspension furious Iraqi lawmakers voted to expel the more than 5,000 U.S. troops that are in Iraq. It was not immediately clear if anyone in the Iraqi government had approved the resumption of the joint military operations, the Times reported.


Japan, U.S., South Korea agree: no easing of North Korea sanctions without progress in nuke talks

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO – The top diplomats of Japan, the United States and South Korea on Tuesday urged North Korea to refrain from military provocation and continue denuclearization talks, but ruled out any easing of crushing economic sanctions without progress in the stalled negotiations. Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi held discussions with his U.S. and South Korean counterparts, Mike Pompeo and Kang Kyung-wha, in East Palo Alto, just outside San Francisco, two weeks after a deadline set by Pyongyang for progress by the end of 2019 passed. "We agreed on the importance of North Korea making positive efforts in talks with the United States rather than going through with provocative moves," Motegi told reporters. The statement appeared to contradict remarks in a New Year speech by South Korean President Moon Jae-in a day earlier in Seoul, where he said that he could seek exemptions of U.N. sanctions to bring about improved inter-Korean relations that he believes would help restart the deadlocked nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington. Moon has previously made similar comments, despite outside worries that any lifting of sanctions could undermine U.S.-led efforts to eliminate North Korea's nuclear arsenal.


Regime change quest suspected as Trump seizes on new Iran protests

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – With presidential tweets in Persian and stern warnings to the regime, Donald Trump's administration is rallying behind the latest protests in Iran -- and renewing suspicions that his real goal is regime change. Just a week ago, massive crowds took to the streets in Iran to mourn powerful Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike in Baghdad, and Tehran fired retaliatory missiles at U.S. forces in Iraq without inflicting casualties. Trump's response was, briefly, unusually conciliatory -- seeking a de-escalation with Iran and noting that they shared common interests, including fighting the Islamic State group. But all has changed since Saturday, when Iran admitted that it accidentally shot down a Ukrainian passenger jet, killing 176 people, setting off a new round of protests by Iranians furious at the deaths and the regime's initial denial. The tragedy has "turned the tide against the Iranian leadership again," said Ali Vaez, director of the Iran Project at the International Crisis Group, which promotes conflict resolution.


AI, machine learning can help achieve $5 trillion target: Piyush Goyal - ET CIO

#artificialintelligence

Commerce and industry minister Piyush Goyal on Monday said artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning can help India achieve the $5 trillion economy benchmark over the next five years. "Our government believes artificial intelligence, in different forms, can help us achieve the $5 trillion benchmark over the next five years, but also help us do it effectively and efficiently," Goyal said while inaugurating the National Stock Exchange (NSE) Knowledge Hub. The hub is an AI-powered learning ecosystem for the banking, financial services and insurance (BFSI) sector. The minister referred to an Accenture report that said AI and machine learning have the potential to contribute nearly $1 trillion to the Indian economy by 2035 and said the Knowledge Hub created by NSE will fill in the gaps and help the financial sector to move into the future. Goyal said Prime Minister Narendra Modi sat through a whole day with officials from various ministries to get the sense of urgency to understand the importance of AI and how it can help put the Indian economy on the fast track.


High-gear diplomacy aims to avert U.S.-Iran conflict

The Japan Times

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – A flurry of diplomatic visits and meetings crisscrossing the Persian Gulf have driven urgent efforts in recent days to defuse the possibility of all-out war after the U.S. killed Iran's top military commander. Global leaders and top diplomats are repeating the mantra of "de-escalation" and "dialog," yet none has publicly laid out a path to achieving either. The United States and Iran have said they do not want war, but fears have grown that the crisis could spin out of Tehran's or Washington's control. Tensions have careened from one crisis to another since President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from Iran's nuclear deal with world powers. The U.S. drone strike that killed Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani and a senior Iraqi militia leader in Baghdad on Jan. 3 was seen as a major provocation.


'Doesn't really matter' if there was an imminent threat from Qassem Soleimani: Trump

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump on Monday morning defended his decision to kill Iranian commander Qassem Soleimani, contending Soleimani posed an impending threat to the United States but also saying that was not important, given the military leader's history. "The Fake News Media and their Democrat Partners are working hard to determine whether or not the future attack by terrorist Soleimani was'imminent' or not, & was my team in agreement." "The answer to both is a strong YES., but it doesn't really matter because of his horrible past!" Since confirming that Iranian military leader Qassem Soleimani had been killed by a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad, administration officials have claimed they acted because of an imminent risk of attacks on American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. Democrats and a few Republicans in Congress have questioned the justification of the attacks and said they have not been given adequate, detailed briefings. Last week Trump posited in an interview that Iran had been poised to attack four American embassies before Soleimani was killed in a U.S. drone strike on Jan. 3.