Asia Government


Academia's Facial Recognition Datasets Illustrate The Globalization Of Today's Data

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This week's furor over FaceApp has largely centered on concerns that its Russian developers might be compelled to share the app's data with the Russian government, much as the Snowden disclosures illustrated the myriad ways in which American companies were compelled to disclose their private user data to the US government. Yet the reality is that this represents a mistaken understanding of just how the modern data trade works today and the simple fact that American universities and companies routinely make their data available to companies all across the world, including in Russia and China. In today's globalized world, data is just as globalized, with national borders no longer restricting the flow of our personal information - trend made worse by the data-hungry world of deep learning. Data brokers have long bought and sold our personal data in a shadowy world of international trade involving our most intimate and private information. The digital era has upended this explicit trade through the interlocking world of passive exchange through analytics services.


Iran denies claim that US warship destroyed Iranian drone

FOX News

Iran's Revolutionary Guard claims the vessel was caught trying to smuggle Iranian oil to foreign ships; Trey Yingst reports. Iran on Friday denied President Trump's claim that a U.S. warship destroyed an Iranian drone near the Persian Gulf after it threatened the ship -- an incident that further escalated tensions between the countries. Trump said Thursday that the USS Boxer – which is among several U.S. Navy ships in the area – took defensive action after an Iranian drone came within 1,000 yards of the warship and ignored multiple calls to stand down. Trump blamed Iran for a "provocative and hostile" action and said the U.S. responded in self-defense. But Iran's foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, told reporters as he arrived for a meeting at the United Nations that "we have no information about losing a drone today."


A mind of its own: Russia unveils terrifying new AI 'superweapon'

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The race to incorporate artificial intelligence in modern weapons threatens to outstrip the technology's capabilities -- and the world's ability to control them. The Commander-in-Chief of Russia's air force, Viktor Bondarev, has told a gathering at the MAKS-2017 international airshow his aircraft would soon be getting cruise missiles with artificial intelligence capable of analysing their environment and opponents and make "decisions" about altitude, speed, course -- and targets. "Work in this area is under way," Russian news agency TASS reports Tactical Missiles Corporation CEO Boris Obnosov as adding. "As of today, certain successes are available, but we'll still have to work for several years to achieve specific results." While neither indicated which missiles were slated to get such enhanced artificial intelligence, there are two apparent contenders among the "super weapons" President Vladimir Putin bragged about last year: the "Avangard" hypersonic glide vehicle and the "Burevestnik" nuclear-powered cruise missile.


Peter Thiel says FBI, CIA should investigate if Chinese intelligence infiltrated Google: report

FOX News

Tucker examines Google's algorithms and how they benefit Democrat ahead of 2020. Billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel on Sunday called for the FBI and CIA to investigate whether Chinese intelligence had infiltrated Google, according to a report. Thiel, who supported Trump in 2016 and Facebook board member, made the comments during a speech at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington. He said the FBI and CIA needed to ask Google three questions to determine if the tech giant had been compromised by Chinese intelligence, Axios reported. FILE: A Google Home Hub is displayed in New York.


Russia's terrifying new 'superweapon' revealed

#artificialintelligence

The Commander-in-Chief of Russia's air force Viktor Bondarev has told a gathering at the MAKS-2017 international airshow his aircraft would soon be getting cruise missiles with artificial intelligence capable of analysing its environment and opponents and make "decisions" about altitude, speed, course -- and targets. "Work in this area is underway," Russian news agency TASS reports Tactical Missiles Corporation CEO Boris Obnosov as adding. "As of today, certain successes are available, but we'll still have to work for several years to achieve specific results." While neither indicated which missiles were slated to get such enhanced artificial intelligence, there are two apparent contenders among the "super weapons" President Vladimir Putin bragged about last year: the "Avangard" hypersonic glide vehicle and the "Burevestnik" nuclear-powered cruise missile. RELATED: Why the world's most holy place sends people crazy RELATED: Earth's magnetic pole is on the move and we don't know why Much modern weaponry is already capable of making choices -- such as the automated Gatling guns designed to react and shoot-down incoming missiles in the blink of an eye.


The Geopolitics of Artificial Intelligence

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Something stood out of the ordinary during a speech by China's president, Xi Jinping, in January 2018. Behind Xi, on a bookshelf, were two books on artificial intelligence (AI). Why were those books there? Similar to 2015, when Russia "accidentally" aired designs for a new weapon, the placement of the books may not have been an accident. Was China sending a message?


How AI is advancing across the world map London Business School

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has gained geo-strategic importance. Russian President Vladimir Putin asserted that whoever became the leader in the field would rule the world. Countries are jostling to stay ahead of the game. China, UK, France, Germany, Finland, Canada, Japan, South Korea, India, Singapore, Mexico, Kenya, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), among others, have released national plans to promote the development and use of AI. They are very different, each building on the country's strengths.


Robotic surgery set to transform medical care in the Gulf

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DUBAI: When it comes to man versus machine, many industries, including medical science, are at a critical juncture. Advancements in technology are creating a world where robots are performing tasks with speed and efficiency unmatched by their human counterparts. Increasingly, robots are becoming a familiar presence in operating theaters, especially in the Gulf. Experts predict that the region could become the leader in the field of robotic surgery. In June, Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare (JHAH) -- the result of a joint venture between Saudi Aramco and Johns Hopkins Medicine -- became the first hospital in the Kingdom to perform a robot-assisted hysterectomy.


Yamato and Rakuten to test delivery robots on Japan's public roads

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Yamato Transport and Rakuten are among a group of companies set to partner with the Japanese government to test unmanned delivery robots on public roads. The government will set up a council of officials from the public and private sectors next week to identify potential issues, including liability in the event of accidents and how to maintain safety. The group will also examine operating rules that could eventually be added to the Road Traffic Act. It is hoped that the robots will alleviate the labor shortage in Japan's logistics sector, as well as create new business opportunities. The robots are equipped with cameras and GPS to deliver goods without human intervention.


Iran vows to ditch more nuclear curbs in war of words with U.S.

The Japan Times

TEHRAN - Iran said Tuesday it will further free itself from the 2015 nuclear deal in defiance of new American sanctions as U.S. President Donald Trump warned the Islamic republic of "overwhelming" retaliation for any attacks. Tensions between Iran and the U.S. have spiraled since last year when Trump withdrew the United States from the deal under which Tehran was to curb its nuclear program in exchange for relief from economic sanctions. The two arch-rivals have been locked in an escalating war of words since Iran shot down a U.S. surveillance drone in what it said was its own airspace, a claim the US vehemently denies. On Monday, Washington stepped up pressure by blacklisting Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and top military chiefs, saying it would also sanction Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif later in the week. Tehran was defiant on Tuesday, saying the new US sanctions against Iran showed Washington was "lying" about an offer of talks.