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The NLP Cypher

#artificialintelligence

Around five percent of papers from the conference were on graphs so lots to discuss. A new paper (with authors from every major big tech), was recently published showing how one can attack language models like GPT-2 and extract information verbatim like personal identifiable information from just by querying the model. The information extracted derived from the models' training data that was based on scraped internet info. This is a big problem especially when you train a language model on a private custom dataset. Looks like Booking.com wants a new recommendation engine and they are offering up their dataset of over 1 million anonymized hotel reservations to get you in the game.


U.S. Air Force achieves first military flight with artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The U.S. Air Force has tested the ARTUμ integrated artificial intelligence system on the U-2 Dragon Lady strategic reconnaissance aircraft. This flight marks a major leap forward for national defense as artificial intelligence took flight aboard a military aircraft for the first time in the Department of Defense history. Air Combat Command's U-2 Federal Laboratory researchers developed ARTUµ and trained it to execute specific in-flight tasks that otherwise would be done by the pilot. During the reconnaissance flight, ARTUµ was responsible for the preliminary processing of information from the reconnaissance systems of the U-2 aircraft. At the same time, it must perform many more tasks, including monitoring the surrounding airspace and choosing the flight route.


AI controlled a US military aircraft for the first time

Engadget

As much as the US military relies on drones to bolster its aerial arsenal, it has still relied on human operators to guide its aircraft -- until now. Air Force Assistant Secretary Dr. Will Roper has revealed to Popular Mechanics that AI controlled a US military aircraft (and really, military system) for the first time, serving as the "co-pilot" aboard a U-2 Dragon Lady spy plane during a California flight on December 15th. ARTUμ, a variant of the μZero AI used for games like chess, had ultimate control over radar during a simulated missile strike on Beale Air Force Base. It determined when to focus on hunting for missiles and when to focus on self-preservation. Effectively, that made it the mission leader -- it wasn't flying, but it determined where the human pilot should fly.


U-2 Flies with Artificial Intelligence as Its Co-Pilot - Air Force Magazine

#artificialintelligence

One of the Air Force's oldest planes became the first military aircraft to fly with artificial intelligence as its copilot on Dec. 15. A U-2 from Beale Air Force Base, Calif., flew with an AI algorithm that controlled the Dragon Lady's sensors and tactical navigation during a local training sortie. The algorithm, developed by Air Combat Command's U-2 Federal Laboratory and named ARTUµ in a reference to the droid that serves as a copilot in the Star Wars film franchise, took over tasks normally handled by the pilot, in turn letting the flier focus on the flying. "ARTUµ's groundbreaking flight culminates our three-year journey to becoming a digital force," said Will Roper, the Air Force's assistant secretary of acquisition, in a release. Failing to realize AI's full potential will mean ceding decision advantage to our adversaries." The laboratory used more than a half-million simulated training missions to build the algorithm, which took over sensors after takeoff. The training scenario focused on a simulated missile strike, with ARTUµ finding enemy missile launchers and the pilot looking for adversary aircraft--both using the U-2's radar, according to the release. "We know that in order to fight and win in a future conflict with a peer adversary, we must have a decisive digital advantage," Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr said in the release. "AI will play a critical role in achieving that edge, so I'm incredibly proud of what the team accomplished.




Global Big Data Conference

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center has awarded a $93.3 million contract to General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI), makers of the MQ-9 Reaper, to equip the drone with new AI technology. The aim is for the Reaper to be able to carry out autonomous flight, decide where to direct its battery of sensors, and to recognize objects on the ground. The contract, announced at the end of last month, builds on a successful test earlier this year. In some ways this is not a major development, more of an incremental step using existing technology. What makes it significant is the drone that is being equipped, and what it will be able to do afterwards.


U.S. To Equip MQ-9 Reaper Drones With Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center has awarded a $93.3 million contract to General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI), makers of the MQ-9 Reaper, to equip the drone with new AI technology. The aim is for the Reaper to be able to carry out autonomous flight, decide where to direct its battery of sensors, and to recognize objects on the ground. The contract, announced at the end of last month, builds on a successful test earlier this year. In some ways this is not a major development, more of an incremental step using existing technology. What makes it significant is the drone that is being equipped, and what it will be able to do afterwards.



Pentagon sends B-52 bombers to Persian Gulf, as US launches airstrikes in Somalia after pulling out

FOX News

Former CIA director, author of the book'Undaunted,' John Brennan provides insight on'Fox News Sunday.' The U.S. military flew a pair of B-52 bombers to the Middle East Thursday from Barksdale AFB in Louisiana the second deterrence mission against Iran in recent weeks and comes on the same day U.S. drones attacked al-Qaeda-linked'explosives experts' in Somalia. "We have seen some indications of increased attack planning by Iranian-linked forces inside Iraq" said one U.S. military official who declined to be identified to discuss the sensitive nature of the information. "Presidential transitions are normally a time when our adversaries try to test us," the official added. U.S. military forces are drawing down to 2,500 in Iraq and Afghanistan before January 20th.