Immigration & Customs


The most profound technologies are those that disappear

Popular Science

JetBlue passengers flying from Boston to Aruba can now present a new kind of boarding pass, one impossible to misplace: their faces. In lieu of handing over a paper ticket or summoning up a smartphone version, beach-bound commuters simply walk up to the gate and pause in front of a camera. There, biometric software compares it against databases of passport, visa, and immigration images. If the computer finds a match, a screen at the gate flashes a green check mark--the universal "go" sign meaning you're cleared to drag your wheelie bag and stuffed-animal pillow down the gangway. Biometric boarding probably wasn't what Xerox PARC chief technologist Mark Weiser had in mind when he coined the term "ubiquitous computing" in 1988.


The Morning After: Friday, October 13th 2017

Engadget

Yesterday, we got a date for a giant robot battle, the chance to win tickets (and gadgets) for the Engadget Experience, and Virgin joined the Hyperloop... hype. Reviews Editor Cherlynn Low discusses the Department of Homeland Security's modified system of records, and how it would allow the DHS, Border Patrol and other immigration authorities to collect social media handles as part of an individual's official record. Malicious code spotted on Equifax's website As if the company didn't have enough problems, a malicious Flash pop-up appeared on its customer site. Epic giant robot battle scheduled for October 17th The MegaBots vs. Suidobashi fight will be streamed live on Twitch Are you ready for the world's first giant robot fight?


After Plastic Surgery In South Korea, Chinese Women Detained At Airport

International Business Times

According the Chinese publication, Shanghaiist, the women were not allowed onto their return flight after security officials couldn't confirm that their faces post the surgery matched with those in their passports. In pictures of the three women shared online, they were seen sitting at a South Korea airport, with their passports in hand, and their faces appeared to be swollen, wrapped up in bandages. According to reports, the photo was first posted on Weibo by Chinese TV presenter Jian Huahua on Sunday and has since been taken down. Jian captioned that these women were detained and questioned by the immigration authorities after they could not be identified from photos on their passports even after they displaying their tickets and various documents.


A Rare Joint Interview with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Bill Gates

Wall Street Journal

Nadella, more soft-spoken than his predecessors, Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer, assumed the company's helm amid one of its stormiest chapters. In the book's foreword, Gates, 61, who co-founded Microsoft, reigned atop the company for a quarter century and now co-chairs the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, lauds Nadella's humility and pragmatism. Satya Nadella: I ran into Steve Ballmer maybe a couple of months after he had finished as CEO, and I asked him, "Hey, are you writing a book?" SS: Elon Musk has fretted that artificial intelligence could turn humans into "house cats" once computers become smarter than us.


How AI is taking over the global economy in one chart

#artificialintelligence

Immigration activists interrupted House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi during a press conference in San Francisco, which she held with DREAMers to reaffirm her support for pro-DACA legislation. Drowned out by protestors, Pelosi responded, "Yes I have ... You don't know what you're talking about." The context: The activists said they protested Pelosi because she and other Democrats are negotiating with Trump and congressional Republicans about a legislative replacement for DACA, the Obama-era order that shielded about 800,000 illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation, and allowed them to apply for work permits. Worth noting: Pelosi and Chuck Schumer raised DACA with Trump at a White House meeting earlier this month, and have said replacing it will be a top priority in the coming weeks and months.


The Legal Case for DACA

Mother Jones

It only took a few hours for the first lawsuit to be filed against the Trump Administration for its decision on Tuesday morning to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA. At a press conference in Washington D.C., Attorney General Jeff Sessions called Obama's implementation of the policy in 2012 "an unconstitutional exercise of authority," and rescinded it in order to retain what he calls the country's "unsurpassed legal heritage." MJ: Both President Trump and AG Jeff Sessions in their statements claimed that the DACA program contributed to the child migrant crisis, which hit a peak in 2014. SYL: The attorneys general of ten states threatened to file suit today, claiming that the DACA program was illegal.


Putin: Whoever leads in AI will rule the world

#artificialintelligence

This is about young people who grew up in America – kids who study in our schools, young adults who are starting careers, patriots who pledge allegiance to our flag. Over the years, politicians of both parties have worked together to write legislation that would have told these young people – our young people – that if your parents brought you here as a child, if you've been here a certain number of years, and if you're willing to go to college or serve in our military, then you'll get a chance to stay and earn your citizenship. It is precisely because this action is contrary to our spirit, and to common sense, that business leaders, faith leaders, economists, and Americans of all political stripes called on the administration not to do what it did today. And I join my voice with the majority of Americans who hope they step up and do it with a sense of moral urgency that matches the urgency these young people feel.


It's up to Trump country to integrate immigrants now

Los Angeles Times

According to an analysis by the Wall Street Journal, the diversity index at least doubled in 244 U.S. counties between 2000 and 2015, and more than half of those counties were in Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota. The Wall Street Journal's analysis reported that Trump won two out of every three voters in counties where the diversity index rose by 150% or more. In earlier frontiers, public and civil society efforts focused on immigrants themselves --facilitating their language acquisition, their education, housing, healthcare and more general comfort. Immigration isn't just a coastal phenomenon: Middle American cities and towns are growing more diverse.


Automated English visa test struggles to understand English

Engadget

An Irish veterinarian's application for an Australian visa has been rejected after she failed to pass an automated English proficiency test, despite completing it in her native language of... English. Despite acing the reading and writing parts of the test she didn't score highly enough on oral fluency, as it seems the machines couldn't understand her accent. The Pearson Test of English (PTE) Academic is an automated system that asks applicants a number of questions and records their vocal responses which are analyzed and scored. Speaking to The Guardian, Kennedy -- who is now considering other options for staying in the county -- said: "There's obviously a flaw in their computer software when a person with perfect oral fluency cannot get enough points."


Data Sciences, ISIS and Predictions for 2016

@machinelearnbot

Do you know what is common between San Bernardino's shooting spree and the terrorist attacks in Paris last month? Can we run a simulation or train a deep learning neural network to find out what percentage of people is vulnerable for becoming radicalized? We have found millennials in Europe have 250 friends on average on Facebook, while the people with probability of radicalization have less than 100. First generation immigrants have a lot of ties back home, are connected with their communities, culture, food, and are usually more worried about the country back home than the county they are living in.