Fishing



AI and machine learning to be rolled out for more sustainable fishing

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From artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to CCTV and big data – computer scientists at the University of East Anglia are part of an international effort to make the fishing industry more sustainable. UEA are part of a new £5 million EU-funded project to revolutionise the fishing industry, which employs over 24,000 people in the UK and contributes around £1.4 billion to our economy. It is hoped that pioneering technology will contribute to making the industry more environmentally friendly, sustainable and profitable. The'SMARTFISH-H2020' project, co-ordinated by SINTEF Ocean in Norway, draws on research from universities in Norway, Denmark, Turkey, France and Spain, along with institutes and industry partners across Europe. Other UK partners include Marine Scotland, The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), and Safetynet Technologies Limited.


The Amazing Ways Google Uses Artificial Intelligence And Satellite Data To Prevent Illegal Fishing

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Google services such as its image search and translation tools use sophisticated machine learning which allow computers to see, listen and speak in much the same way as human do. Machine learning is the term for the current cutting-edge applications in artificial intelligence. Basically, the idea is that by teaching machines to "learn" by processing huge amounts of data they will become increasingly better at carrying out tasks that traditionally can only be completed by human brains. These techniques include "computer vision" – training computers to recognize images in a similar way we do. For example, an object with four legs and a tail has a high probability of being an animal.


Sushi robots, AI pianos and jump jetpacks on SXSW's show floor

Engadget

Japanese companies showed up at SXSW with a handful of concepts for the future, including Lunavity, a jetpack designed to help the wearer jump higher and farther. It simulates jumping in a low-gravity space -- hence the lunar namesake -- and opens up new sports possibilities. One developer specifically mentioned quidditch, for instance. The project itself is called Open Meals, and the goal is to digitize different foods and then have robots recreate those recipes anywhere in the world (or in space, as the marketing video demonstrates). The food itself will be constructed out of a gel that can take on a variety of textures.


8-bit sushi has arrived and #foodporn pics may never be the same again

Mashable

How about 3D-printed sushi that looks like it belongs in an 8-bit video game? At SXSW, Open Meals showed off a "Pixel Food Printer" that 3D prints edible pixelated sushi. SEE ALSO: Elon Musk drops epic Falcon Heavy launch trailers made by'Westworld' co-creator The guys at Open Meals want to do for food what Apple did for digital music: make it easy to download -- or in this case "teleport" -- food from anywhere in the world. Food Base is basically the iTunes of 3D printable food. To achieve this, they've created two key components.


How lasers and robo-feeders are transforming fish farming

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Fish farming is big business - the industry now produces about 100 million tonnes a year - and with salmon prices soaring, producers are turning to lasers, automation and artificial intelligence to boost production and cut costs.



Industrial Fishing Occupies a Third of the Planet

National Geographic News

How do you study the world's more widespread predator? When a team of researchers set out to see how prevalent industrial fishing was around the world--who was fishing where and when--they were met with a dearth of information. They lacked access to vessel monitoring systems closely held by regional fishery managers, says Juan Mayorga, a marine data scientist from National Geographic's Pristine Seas project. And that information would have shown only pieces of the puzzle. To circumvent this obstacle, Mayorga and a team of researchers took a step back--way back--and tracked marine vessels from space, using satellites to learn where industrial fishing vessels fished and when.


How lasers and robo-feeders are transforming fish farming

BBC News

Fish farming is big business - the industry now produces about 100 million tonnes a year - and with salmon prices soaring, producers are turning to lasers, automation and artificial intelligence to boost production and cut costs.