Agriculture


AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control

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In a departure from using AI and machine learning tools for tasks such as automating customer service, some companies are applying the technologies to grow better corn crops and exterminate bugs and vermin. The researcher defines machine learning (ML), a sub-field of AI, as algorithms leveraging technologies that operate based on existing information and are used in both unsupervised and supervised learning. Some of the company's 5,000 pest control technicians are using an Android mobile app developed by Accenture to identify bugs. The picture calls home to Google's image classification and machine learning software to sift through a number of pest images and identify the intruder, according to Nisha Sharma, a managing director in Accenture's mobility group.


Hands-free farming using autonomous tractors and drones

Daily Mail

Researchers have pioneered an autonomous tractor which can be steered by a farmer from a control room to carry out the drilling, seeding and spraying of the land. Researchers have pioneered an autonomous tractor which can be steered by a farmer from a control room to carry out the drilling, seeding and spraying of the land. Drilling of the spring crop of barley has already taken place on the land and over the coming months the crop will be cultivated before harvest in August and September. Drilling of the spring crop of barley has already taken place on the land and over the coming months the crop will be cultivated before harvest in August and September.


Automated agriculture: Can robots, drones, and AI save us from starvation?

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We produce more food than ever before -- but our current model is unsustainable, and as the world's population rapidly approaches the 8 billion mark, modern food production methods will need a radical transformation if they're going to keep up. One of Khot's main projects at the moment focuses on irrigation, experimenting with different irrigation techniques and amounts of water, and using drone imagery to track the subsequent health of plants. They adjust the amount of water used as part of their research, and use drone imaging to map the crops, testing "to see if we can go to 60 percent or 30 percent, and still the plant can grow and produce as good a yield." Advanced milking systems allow the cows to approach a milking robot when they feel like it.


FarmView - Work That Matters - Carnegie Mellon University

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Artificial intelligence experts at Carnegie Mellon University are teaming up with agricultural leaders and plant scientists to solve the emerging global food crisis. Enter Carnegie Mellon's FarmView, a multidisciplinary research team that is developing automated, data-driven decision tools to increase the yield of sorghum, a drought- and heat-tolerant grain that thrives in famine-prone parts of the world. Researchers are collecting data with drones, robots and stationary sensors on sorghum plants growing at Clemson University, a FarmView partner. Carnegie Mellon researchers are using their expertise to fight world hunger, and doing the work that matters.



BOSS Magazine Deep Learning AI Could Help End World Hunger

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It increasingly seems that "deep learning" artificial intelligence will have a significant role to play, and a number of notable technologies are now making a real difference for the world's farms. With a deep learning AI system distinguishing between weeds and the sprouts that farmers want to cultivate, Blue River's LettuceBot cuts those losses by up to 90 percent. Agricultural IoT provider OnFarm figures that this ramp-up will see the average farm generating four million data points each day by 2050. In the past, some fairly crude approaches produced notable successes of this basic kind.


AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control

@machinelearnbot

Seed retailers, for example, are using AI products to churn through terabytes of precision agricultural data to create the best corn crops, while pest control companies are using AI-based image-recognition technology to identify and treat various types of bugs and vermin. The researcher defines machine learning (ML), a sub-field of AI, as algorithms leveraging technologies that operate based on existing information and are used in both unsupervised and supervised learning. Some of the company's 5,000 pest control technicians are using an Android mobile app developed by Accenture to identify bugs. The picture calls home to Google's image classification and machine learning software to sift through a number of pest images and identify the intruder, according to Nisha Sharma, a managing director in Accenture's mobility group.


Artificial intelligence advances to make farming smarter

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Microsoft Research principal researcher Ranveer Chandra has been in New Zealand for a week offering insights into precision agriculture and advances the United States technology company is working on to improve farming and food production. The Indian-born researcher went to the US 18 years ago to complete post-graduate studies and has led Microsoft projects including in longer lasting batteries and TV white space networking. Chandra's research included aerial imagery work with drones and tethered balloons above cattle farms in the US to plot cow movements in a pasture farm to see if they were grazing properly and pastures were being grazed at the right level. Research for field crop farms in the US showed precision agriculture improved yields and returns on investment, but the sensors were expensive with five of them costing US$8000.


Is Machine Learning the Future of Soil Fertility?

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With its initiatives Springg and SoilCares, the company, Dutch Sprouts, works with Talend, a big data integration company, to blend a mix of hardware and software to gather and analyze soil samples around the globe. The key to success is having a broad database so the samples are correctly calibrated and can make accurate predictions about nutrient levels in the soil. "It improves with every sample added to the database," van Helvoort says. Currently, samples are being collected in the Fargo, N.D., area, a necessary step before launching broadly in the U.S. "We need a good database before we can enter a new market," van Helvoort says, adding that the future of farming will rely on easy-to-use tools like this that give farmers quick, easy access to a variety of information.


For Now, At Least, Genetically Engineered Babies Are Likely To Remain The Stuff Of Science Fiction

Forbes

The report, from the influential National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), concluded that clinical trials of genome "editing" of the human germline--cells that can be passed from one generation to the next--could one day be permitted, but only for serious inherited conditions and under stringent oversight. "Genome editing has great promise for preventing, ameliorating or eliminating many human diseases and conditions," the report concluded. While germline genome editing to eliminate inherited diseases might seem like a worthy goal, critics say it could lead to attempts to make healthy babies even healthier, not to mention smarter, more athletic and more attractive. While some people have said the NAS/NAM report cracks open the door to germline gene editing, Alta Charo, co-chair of the committee that wrote it, described it as more like knocking on the door.