Agriculture


How artificial intelligence is helping farmers and babies in the developing world

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Businesses and nonprofits are finding novel ways to employ artificial intelligence in the developing world, using the tools to improve agriculture yields, infant health care, and entrepreneur earnings, according to speakers at MIT Technology Review's EmTech Digital conference in San Francisco on Tuesday. Solomon Assefa, who oversees IBM's research labs in Kenya and South Africa, said the company has been using AI to more accurately predict crop yields in specific regions, based on shifting weather patterns, soil moisture, and other conditions. This insight into growing conditions has helped local farmers raise financing to expand their operations, or make better decisions about the right seeds, appropriate fertilizer, and ideal times to plant and harvest. Separately, the tech giant's research lab has partnered with a startup, Hello Tractor, that links farmers in need of tractors with owners looking to lease equipment. By forecasting demand for the vehicles, IBM has also helped owners raise money to expand their fleet, boosting their profits, Assefa said.


New Zealand farmers have a new tool for herding sheep: drones that bark like dogs

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You have probably read about robots replacing human labor as a new era of automation takes root in one industry after another. But a new report suggests humans are not the only ones who might lose their jobs. In New Zealand, farmers are using drones to herd and monitor livestock, assuming a job that highly intelligent dogs have held for more than a century. The robots have not replaced the dogs entirely, Radio New Zealand reports, but they have appropriated one of the animal's most potent tools: barking. The DJI Mavic Enterprise, a $3,500 drone favored by farmers, has a feature that lets the machine record sounds and play them over a loud speaker, giving the machine the ability to mimic its canine counterparts.


The Amazing Ways John Deere Uses AI And Machine Vision To Help Feed 10 Billion People

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In just 30 years' time, it is forecasted that the human population of our planet will be close to 10 billion. Producing enough food to feed these hungry mouths will be a challenge, and demographic trends such as urbanization, particularly in developing countries, will only add to that. To meet that challenge, agricultural businesses are pinning their hopes on technology, and that idea that increasingly sophisticated data and analytics tools will help to drive efficiencies and cut waste in agriculture and food production. Leading the way is John Deere – the 180-year-old manufacturer of farming and industrial machinery which has spent the past decade transforming itself into an artificial intelligence (AI) and data-driven business. I have covered John Deere before here.


Artificial Intelligence: Endgame for Farming or Fresh Start?

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In case you haven't noticed, human level machine intelligence is already here. The end of the world is coming … eventually. Shortly before his death last year, famed physicist Stephen Hawking left us with several rather grim predictions for the future of Earth and life on it. At the top of his list was the takeover of artificial intelligence (AI). In an interview with Wired, he was quoted as follows: "We need to move forward on artificial intelligence development, but we also need to be mindful of its very real dangers. I fear that AI may replace humans altogether. If people design computer viruses, someone will design AI that replicates itself. This will be a new form of life that will outperform humans."


Deveron Receives AI for Earth Grant from Microsoft

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Toronto, Ontario--(Newsfile Corp. - March 11, 2019) - Deveron UAS Corp. ("Deveron" or the "Company") and Deveron's wholly owned data analytics subsidiary, Veritas Farm Management ()Veritas") have been awarded an AI for Earth grant from Microsoft to help further our efforts in artificial intelligence ()AI") and making recommendations and predictions using agricultural data. This new grant will provide Deveron with Microsoft Azure computing resources and AI tools to accelerate our work on utilizing in-season imagery and AI to apply nitrogen fertilizer to corn. Deveron will help growers more fully utilize the nitrogen credit produced when cover crops are introduced into crop rotation. Additional nitrogen can then be applied as needed using variable rate applications around these credits, insuring that the nitrogen needs of the crop is met in an efficient way across the field. "We are excited to be chosen by Microsoft to participate in this transformational opportunity" reported David Macmillan, President and CEO of Deveron.


How machine learning and the Internet of Things could transform your business ZDNet

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This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, explores how infrastructure around the world is being linked together via sensors, machine learning and analytics. As growing numbers of internet-connected sensors are built into cars, planes, trains and buildings, businesses are amassing vast amounts of data. Tapping into that data to extract useful information is a challenge that's starting to be met using the pattern-matching abilities of machine learning (ML) -- a subset of the field of artificial intelligence (AI).


New Zealand farmers are using drones to herd sheep

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Lambeth's employer, Ben Crossley, confirmed that his fourth-generation farm is indeed using drones to control sheep. One favored model: the DJI Mavic Enterprise, which is already outfitted to play sounds -- such as barking -- over a speaker. The Washington Post noted that farmers are already using drones around the world for a variety of farming tasks, *including* surveying crops. The Washington Post noted that farmers are already using drones around the world for a variety of farming tasks, including surveying crops. Having the devices deal directly with animals is less common -- but it could be a vision of the future of agriculture.


Smart Farming: Mixed Reality and AI

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Even in our modern world, farming remains a core industry. Human beings engaged in agribusiness are working day and night to increase crop yield and livestock growth. Mixed reality (MR) and artificial intelligence (AI) technologies represent some of the latest and most exciting avenues these agribusiness innovators are pursuing to transform classical farming into smart farming. The new term "mixed reality" (or "hybrid reality") is becoming more popular these days. It refers to the layering on of digital or simulated information onto the real world: a mixing of "real" reality and "virtual" reality, leading to one "mixed" or "hybrid" reality.


Using Satellite Images and Artificial Intelligence to Improve Agricultural Resilience

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Big data and artificial intelligence offer new ways to solve age-old problems, such as how to feed a growing population. Under our Grand Challenge program, RTI is funding research and analysis based on these technologies to promote agricultural resilience and food security in Rwanda. Most of Rwanda's crop production comes from smallholder farms. The country's agriculture officials have historically had insufficient data on where crops are cultivated or how much yield to expect--a hindrance when planning for the future of their growing country. The government is looking to technology for a solution.


Robots Are Coming to Take Over Your Farms

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Advanced agriculture technology like Harvest CROO Robotics' automated strawberry harvester are poised to take on the heavy lifting for farmers. "Necessity is the mother of invention," so the saying goes. It's certainly appropriate when referring to advancements made in agriculture technology. The lack of available farm labor alone has given rise to automated smart harvesters. In a recently published article, two University of Florida researchers say robots and information technology will be the rule and no longer the exception on farms in the coming years.