Nuclear


Robots to the rescue!

Robohub

Robots and drones can be deployed quickly in areas deemed too unsafe for humans and are used to guide rescuers, collect data, deliver essential supplies or provide communication services. IEC TC 47: Semiconductor devices, and its SC 47F: Micro electromechanical systems, are responsible for compiling a wide range of International Standards for the semiconductor devices used in sensors and the MEMS essential to the safe operation of drone flights. IEC TC 2: Rotating machinery, prepares International Standards covering specifications for rotating electrical machines, while IEC TC 91: Electronics assembly technology, is responsible for standards on electronic assembly technologies including components. In addition to IEC TC 47: Semiconductor devices and IEC SC 47F: Microelectromechanical systems, mentioned above, other IEC TCs involved in standardization work for specific areas affecting rescue and disaster relief robots include IEC TC 44: Safety of machinery – Electrotechnical aspects; IEC TC 2: Rotating machinery; IEC TC 17: Switchgear and controlgear; and IEC TC 22: Power electronic systems and equipment.


IBM Is Clueless About AI Risks

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"The impact of AI is evident in the debate about its societal implications--with some fearful prophets envisioning massive job loss, or even an eventual AI'overlord' that controls humanity. "When you actually do the science of machine intelligence, and when you actually apply it in the real world of business and society--as we have done at IBM to create our pioneering cognitive computing system, Watson--you understand that this technology does not support the fear-mongering commonly associated with the AI debate today." But it requires hard work to solve the AI control problem to make sure increasingly autonomous AI would stop and return control to humans when those critical decisions need to be made." On the potential for poorly designed AI to create problems for humanity as it grows to eventually exceed human capabilities in virtually every area, Russell made mention of other notable "fearful prophets," including Alan Turing, the founder of computer science; Norbert Weiner, the mathematical pioneer of modern automation; Marvin Minsky, one of the "founding fathers" of AI itself; Bill Gates and Elon Musk--two of the "leading technologists of the last 50 years"--and "a great many of the current leaders of AI research."


'Petya' cyber attack: Chernobyl's radiation monitoring system hit by worldwide hack

The Independent

Though the attack began in the country – and most of the damage is still being done there – it is rapidly spreading across the world, hitting firms across Europe and America. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


First counterterror drill for drone attack held at nuclear plant in Ehime

The Japan Times

Some 60 people from the police and Japan Coast Guard participated in the exercise at the Ikata nuclear power plant, which simulated a drone launched from a boat planting a makeshift explosive device on the premises of reactor 3. Officials of Shikoku Electric Power Co., which runs the plant, and members of the bomb disposal unit in the Ehime Prefectural Police also took part. "We took into account the serious situation regarding terrorism in conducting this drill, and I think it is important to prepare for the unpredictable," said Hideto Murase, the local security chief of the Ehime Prefectural Police. Shikoku Electric plans to finish building by March 2020 a facility that is capable of withstanding major terror attacks, such as those involving intentional aircraft crashes, and preventing the release of radioactive materials.


VIDEO: Watch Drone Footage Of Fukushima's Rebuilding Post-Nuclear Disaster

International Business Times

The government in Fukushima, Japan released drone footage Thursday showing the progression made in the area's rebuilding process six years after an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown devastated the region. The prefectural government announced recently it had made "tremendous progress" in revitalization efforts, allowing some residents to return to evacuated areas. Read: 'Unimaginable' Nuclear Radiation Inside Fukushima So Destructive, Not Even Robots Can Survive Officials began welcoming residents back to towns nearby the defunct power plant in April, six years after 160,000 residents were evacuated from a 310 square mile uninhabitable zone. A home sits inside the uninhabitable zone caused by the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, Feb. 26, 2016.


David Carpenter: Purpose driven to the core

MIT News

When he first reported to MIT's Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) as an undergraduate in 2002, David Carpenter anticipated a challenging research opportunity. After 15 years at the NRL conducting research and earning degrees in nuclear science and engineering, Carpenter's appetite for scientific discovery remains sharp, as does his commitment to improving both the performance and safety of current and next-generation nuclear reactors. "The design is intrinsically safe because the fuel doesn't melt, and the salt can withstand high temperatures without requiring thick, pressurized containment buildings," he says. The challenges to designing this new kind of reactor involve finding optimal construction materials, since super-hot radioactive salt is highly corrosive.


Artificial Intelligence is shaping the future of Energy - Open Energi

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In the UK, large fossil fuelled power stations are being replaced by increasing levels of widely distributed wind and solar generation. We have spent the last 6 years working with some of the UK's leading companies to manage their flexible demand in real-time and help balance electricity supply and demand UK-wide. Using artificial intelligence and machine learning means we can find creative ways to reschedule the power consumption of many assets in synchrony, helping National Grid to balance the system while minimising the cost of consuming that power for energy users. Artificial Intelligence can help us to unlock this demand-side flexibility and build an electricity system fit for the future; one which cuts consumer bills, integrates renewable energy efficiently, and secures our energy supplies for generations to come.


Nobel-winning Belarusian writer Alexievich speaks on nuclear disasters and the future of human hubris

The Japan Times

Svetlana Alexievich, winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in literature, called the nuclear catastrophes at Chernobyl and Fukushima events that people cannot yet fully fathom and warned against the hubris that humans have the power to conquer nature. The Nobel laureate, who writes in Russian, is known for addressing dramatic and tragic events involving the former Soviet Union – World War II, the Soviet war in Afghanistan, the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster and the 1991 collapse of the communist state. Alexievich, who visited the Tomari nuclear power plant in Hokkaido in 2003, recalled a remark by an official there that a catastrophe like Chernobyl would not happen in Japan because "Japanese are well-prepared for quakes and are not drunken, unlike Russians." Referring to the policies of Japan and other countries to stick with nuclear power even after Chernobyl and Fukushima, she said: "I think that, unless we change our thinking, nuclear power generation will continue."


Yes, the experts are worried about the existential risk of artificial intelligence

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Oren Etzioni, a well-known AI researcher, complains about news coverage of potential long-term risks arising from future success in AI research (see "No, Experts Don't Think Superintelligent AI is a Threat to Humanity"). Thus, in our view, Etzioni's article distracts the reader from the core argument of the book and directs an ad hominem attack against Bostrom under the pretext of disputing his survey results. As Bostrom's data would have already predicted, somewhat more than half (67.5 percent) of Etzioni's respondents plumped for "more than 25 years" to achieve superintelligence--after all, more than half of Bostrom's respondents gave dates beyond 25 years for a mere 50 percent probability of achieving mere human-level intelligence. It's like arguing that nuclear engineers who analyze the possibility of meltdowns in nuclear power stations are "failing to consider the potential benefits" of cheap electricity, and that because nuclear power stations might one day generate really cheap electricity, we should neither mention, nor work on preventing, the possibility of a meltdown.


Experts are worried that advancements in AI could threaten humanity

#artificialintelligence

Oren Etzioni, a well-known AI researcher, complains about news coverage of potential long-term risks arising from future success in AI research (see "No, Experts Don't Think Superintelligent AI is a Threat to Humanity"). He then surveys the opinions of AI researchers, arguing that his results refute Bostrom's. As Bostrom's data would have already predicted, somewhat more than half (67.5 percent) of Etzioni's respondents plumped for "more than 25 years" to achieve superintelligence--after all, more than half of Bostrom's respondents gave dates beyond 25 years for a mere 50 percent probability of achieving mere human-level intelligence. It's like arguing that nuclear engineers who analyze the possibility of meltdowns in nuclear power stations are "failing to consider the potential benefits" of cheap electricity, and that because nuclear power stations might one day generate really cheap electricity, we should neither mention, nor work on preventing, the possibility of a meltdown.