Oil & Gas


Surprise! Some PC games have ad-tracking software installed

Engadget

A smattering of PC games are tracking where you go and what you do on the internet when you aren't playing. Reddit sleuths have discovered that games including Civilization VI, Elder Scrolls Online, Kerbal Space Program (above), Hunt: Showdown and Warhammer: Vermentide II included a tracker called Red Shell. Essentially, it's software that, if installed, discerns whether you were exposed to the marketing campaign for the game you're playing, and if said campaign led to you purchasing the game. In a FAQ section of Red Shell's website (written to developers), it says the following: "All data we collect is YOURs. We do not aggregate, distribute or sell ANY data."


Using AI to Tag your Pictures Business Process Outsourcing Farmout Call Center Philippines and Accredited Call Center Philippines Trainers

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In today's online market place, visual marketing is an integral part of reaching out to customers. Research show that the human brain is more visual. Up to 80% of people remember what they see compared to only 20% of what they read. This is one of the main reasons why visual content resonates more than written content. It has a greater chance of going viral.


How to easily do Object Detection on Drone Imagery using Deep learning

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Man has always been fascinated with a view of the world from the top -- building watch-towers, high fortwalls, capturing the highest mountain peak. To capture a glimpse and share it with the world, people went to great lengths to defy gravity, enlisting the help of ladders, tall buildings, kites, balloons, planes, and rockets. Today, access to drones that can fly as high as 2kms is possible even for the general public. These drones have high resolution cameras attached to them that are capable of acquiring quality images which can be used for various kinds of analysis. With easier access to drones, we're seeing a lot of interest and activity by photographers & hobbyists, who are using it to make creative projects such as capturing inequality in South Africa or breathtaking views of New York which might make Woody Allen proud.


Increasing E&P efficiency with the cloud and machine learning

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The IT industry is experiencing an important transformation as companies invest in new technologies to drive growth and innovation. This trend is strongly reflected in our industry as E&P companies deal with enormous amounts of legacy, and increasing volumes of new data along with the expense and complexity of software to analyze and interpret this information. Challenges faced include operational efficiency, increasingly short project cycle times, communicating with a regional or global workforce, data silos, legacy software and restricted resources. Due to the industry's dynamics and its need for flexibility and information security, the cloud is increasingly seen as a viable and practical solution for the oil & gas industry, particularly now that Cloud service providers are building security into their software development processes. Security of data in the Cloud is often better today than in company's own networks.


AI Nationalism

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The central prediction I want to make and defend in this post is that continued rapid progress in machine learning will drive the emergence of a new kind of geopolitics; I have been calling it AI Nationalism. Machine learning is an omni-use technology that will come to touch all sectors and parts of society. The transformation of both the economy and the military by machine learning will create instability at the national and international level forcing governments to act. AI policy will become the single most important area of government policy. An accelerated arms race will emerge between key countries and we will see increased protectionist state action to support national champions, block takeovers by foreign firms and attract talent.


Why Diversity in the Artificial Intelligence Sector Is Critical

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Artificial intelligence offers limitless potential for the financial industry, but at Fortune's MPW International Summit on Tuesday Mastercard vice chairman Ann Cairns also called attention to some of its existential risks. Cairns had recently been in China, where she said it was clear to her that AI was taking off there in a big way--just as it has in Silicon Valley. The question, she says, is whether we will "perpetuate an East-West divide by having different philosophical views as we teach the computers how to think." This human element of AI is also why it's important to get more women into STEM, she said. Cairns, who became vice chairman of Mastercard (ma) earlier this month, noted that if we don't have a diverse group of people working on AI, "we're going to get computers that think like some bro culture on the West Coast."


CGG: Increasing E&P efficiency with the cloud and machine learning

#artificialintelligence

The IT industry is experiencing an important transformation as companies invest in new technologies to drive growth and innovation. This trend is strongly reflected in our industry as E&P companies deal with enormous amounts of legacy, and increasing volumes of new data along with the expense and complexity of software to analyze and interpret this information. Challenges faced include operational efficiency, increasingly short project cycle times, communicating with a regional or global workforce, data silos, legacy software and restricted resources. Due to the industry's dynamics and its need for flexibility and information security, the cloud is increasingly seen as a viable and practical solution for the oil & gas industry, particularly now that Cloud service providers are building security into their software development processes. Security of data in the Cloud is often better today than in company's own networks.


Big Oil harnesses power of data analysis to ensure survival

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Eni's Sannazzaro oil refinery, 60km south-west of Milan, is an industrial island surrounded by agriculture. But as well as the jumble of pipes, furnaces and storage tanks that characterise such sites, there is a less familiar scene. Rising from a football pitch-sized parcel of land on the edge of the refinery are six futuristic buildings -- grey, rectangular and windowless -- without any obvious association to the production of petroleum and diesel taking place nearby. These buildings are home to one of the world's most powerful computers with capacity of 18.6 petaflops, a measure of computing speed. That is three times quicker than Facebook's fastest and twice that of Nasa's, according to the Top 500 global ranking of supercomputers.


Why Diversity in the Artificial Intelligence Sector Is Critical

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence offers limitless potential for the financial industry, but at Fortune's MPW International Summit on Tuesday Mastercard vice chairman Ann Cairns also called attention to some of its existential risks. Cairns had recently been in China, where she said it was clear to her that AI was taking off there in a big way--just as it has in Silicon Valley. The question, she says, is whether we will "perpetuate an East-West divide by having different philosophical views as we teach the computers how to think." This human element of AI is also why it's important to get more women into STEM, she said. Cairns, who became vice chairman of Mastercard (ma) earlier this month, noted that if we don't have a diverse group of people working on AI, "we're going to get computers that think like some bro culture on the West Coast."


Los Alamos machine learning discovers patterns that reveal earthquake fault behavior

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Scientists can predict where an earthquake might occur, but predicting when it will occur and how strong it will be has been an intractable challenge. A new artificial intelligence-based method identifies sounds that indicate when a fault is about to rupture. An earthquake occurs when massive blocks of Earth, often near the interface between tectonic plates, suddenly slip along fractures in the earth, or faults. The same stress that holds the rock in place under pressure--friction--builds up to a point that the rocks slip past one another rapidly and forcefully, releasing energy via seismic waves. Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers and colleagues discovered a way to successfully predict earthquakes in a laboratory experiment that simulates natural conditions.