Energy Storage


Tesla's South Australian battery to begin final testing

ZDNet

The world's largest lithium-ion battery being built in South Australia to store renewable energy is about to enter final testing. State Premier Jay Weatherill has said Elon Musk's Tesla has finished installing the battery powerpacks at Jamestown, in the state's mid-north, where they are linked to an adjacent wind farm. Weatherill said the 100-megawatt battery will now be energised and tested to ensure it meets all energy market and state government regulatory requirements, and will be up and running in time for the Southern Hemisphere's summer season. When first announced in July, the battery came with a guarantee from Musk that it would be working within 100 days of the grid interconnection agreement being signed, or it would be free for the South Australian government. The 100MW/129MWh battery is expected to provide backup and stability services through energy storage to the South Australian grid.


Battery safety and fire handling

Robohub

Lithium battery safety is an important issue as there are more and more reports of fires and explosions. Fires have been reported in everything from cell phones to airplanes to robots. If you don't know why we need to discuss this, or even if you do know, watch this clip or click here. I am not a fire expert. This post is based on things I have heard and some basic research.


Volkswagen and Google to bring quantum computing benefits to cars

#artificialintelligence

Computers have changed cars at least as much as they've changed our daily lives, but a new partnership between Google and Volkswagen could transform transportation further still: The two are collaborating on how to apply quantum computing to solving some fundamental car-related problems, including optimizing traffic flow, making machine learning more intelligent, and helping to crack the issue of building new battery technologies that can extend range and improve charging rates. Of course, quantum computing isn't a magic panacea that can deliver all of the above just by flicking a switch, but it can calculate much more efficiently than a tradition computer, which is great for dealing with high volume work like artificial intelligence and running simulations. Roadshow reports that the collaborative effort is hoping to add a number of elements into the mix in figuring out traffic optimization, including availability of EV charging spots and parking spaces, for example. Computer power is a limiting factor in both artificial intelligence, which is crucial to the future of autonomous driving, and basic and applied materials science, essential to developing longer-lasting EV batteries. This partnership is just a study for now, but it could become something more later on, especially as automakers focus more on the broader issue of transportation and moving around cities, instead of focusing more narrowly on cars and vehicles themselves.


Fabriq Chorus review: This Alexa-powered smart speaker is an excellent value

PCWorld

I'm a big fan of Amazon's Echo line of smart speakers when it comes to smart home control, and the second-generation Echo is a big improvement over the first. But the Alexa-powered Fabriq Chorus delivers more bang for the buck and it sounds better, too. Where the Echo requires an AC outlet to operate, the Chorus features a 2200mAh rechargeable battery that Fabriq says can deliver up to 6 hours of performance, so you can take the speaker with you. The Chorus also comes with a contact-based charging cradle, so you don't need to bother with plugging and unplugging a USB cable to run the speaker--or charge its battery. The 6.3-inch tall cylindrical speaker is wrapped in wooly fabric (you can choose from four designs), with a thin LED ring around its base.


The Engine announces investments in first group of startups

MIT News

The Engine, founded last year by MIT, today announced investments its first group of seven startups that are developing innovations poised for transformative impact on aerospace, renewable energy, synthetic biology, medicine, and other sectors. To genetically engineer organisms, scientists expose cells to an electric field, which opens pores within the cell membrane, allowing customized DNA to flow into the cell. Buie and his Kytopen co-founder, MIT research scientist Paulo Garcia, developed a microfluidics device that shocks cells continuously. "Anyone in the energy industry will recognize that turning renewable energy into baseload electricity available all day, every day, is an extremely ambitious goal," Chiang says.


Why Bill Joy Is Investing in Solid-State Batteries

WIRED

Are you saying that after all of these years, you've found your black swan with this new Ionic battery technology? To power mobile devices like camcorders, [the industry] went to lithium chemistry--to get rechargeable batteries, they gave up safety and cost, and that's where we are now. And so we went looking for a breakthrough in thermally driven water desalination and didn't find one. But in the long run, advanced alkaline--the chemistry used in the ones you buy in the drug store [that have been] made rechargeable--has a chance of upending the reign of lithium ion batteries, because the materials are cheaper.


Kit Cummins awarded the American Chemical Society Pauling Medal

MIT News

Department of Chemistry Professor Christopher (Kit) Cummins has been honored with the 2017 Linus Pauling Medal, in recognition of his unparalleled synthetic and mechanistic studies of early-transition metal complexes, including reaction discovery and exploratory methods of development to improve nitrogen and phosphorous utilization. It is presented annually in recognition of outstanding achievement in chemistry in the spirit of, and in honor of, Linus Pauling, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1954 and the Nobel Prize for peace in 1962. Cummins joins several current members of the Department of Chemistry in being named a Linus Pauling Medal awardee, including Tim Swager (2016), Stephen Buchwald (2014), and Stephen Lippard (2009), as well as former department members Alexander Rich (1995) and John Waugh (1984). In addition, Cummins Group researchers work to develop new starting materials in phosphate chemistry, including acid forms that provide a starting point for synthesizing new phosphate-based materials with applications in next-generation battery technologies and catalysis.


Ring Video Doorbell review

Popular Science

Like most other smart doorbells, Ring lets you see who's at your door and interact with your guests before letting them in. Since our test home doesn't have built-in doorbell wiring, we chose the wireless installation option. That's partly due to our unique front door situation, and partly due to the Ring's 5-by-2.4-by-1-inch The former was too thin to serve as an adequate base, while the latter were too short to accommodate the Ring's entire length. Our review unit came with the Chime Pro, a $49 chime/Wi-Fi range extender that, once plugged into an outlet, boosts the Ring's network signal and amplifies the sound of the doorbell alerts.


Startup Twenty Two Motors to create smart scooter powered by artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

MUMBAI: A prototype of a smart electric scooter is taking shape at the Gurugram-based Twenty Two Motors complete with GPRS, GPS and devices such as gyroscope and accelerometer. The startup, founded in August 2016 by automobile-loving engineer Parveen Kharb and Vijay Chandrawat, a software engineer with a career spanning startup roles, raised Rs 10 crore last week from a clutch of high-net-worth individuals in auto industry and plans to launch their innovative scooter at the next Auto Expo in February 2018. "The smart scooter is powered by artificial intelligence and all information is accessible on our server through a cloud system," said chief executive Kharb. The rider is always connected to the scooter via the mobile application that allows remote control and access. The cloud system allows for troubleshooting automatically.


Startup Twenty Two Motors to create smart scooter powered by artificial intelligence - ETtech

#artificialintelligence

A prototype of a smart electric scooter is taking shape at the Gurugram-based Twenty Two Motors complete with GPRS, GPS and devices such as gyroscope and accelerometer. The startup, founded in August 2016 by automobile-loving engineer Parveen Kharb and Vijay Chandrawat, a software engineer with a career spanning startup roles, raised Rs 10 crore last week from a clutch of high-net-worth individuals in auto industry and plans to launch their innovative scooter at the next Auto Expo in February 2018. "The smart scooter is powered by artificial intelligence and all information is accessible on our server through a cloud system," said chief executive Kharb. The rider is always connected to the scooter via the mobile application that allows remote control and access. The cloud system allows for troubleshooting automatically.