School Nutrition


Accenture Labs and Akshaya Patra Use Disruptive Technologies to Enhance Efficiency in Mid-Day Meal Program for School Children

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Accenture Labs and Akshaya Patra Use Disruptive Technologies to Enhance Efficiency in Mid-Day Meal Program for School Children "Million Meals" project applied artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things and blockchain to drive efficiency and timeliness of lunch program in government schools across India BENGALURU, India; Apr. 20, 2017 – Accenture (NYSE: ACN) and Akshaya Patra, the world's largest NGO-run Mid-Day Meal Program, collaborated on an innovative project that used disruptive technologies to exponentially increase the number of meals served to children in schools in India that are run and aided by the government. The "Million Meals" project revolutionized Akshaya Patra's supply chain and operations, resulting in improved food quality and expanded service reach. Rooted in a vision to eliminate child hunger, the "Million Meals" project demonstrated how disruptive technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT) and blockchain can help address significant challenges in mass meal production and delivery. Accenture Labs, the research and development arm of Accenture, executed the project over a period of six months in Akshaya Patra's Bengaluru kitchen. An analysis of the project indicated a potential to improve efficiency by 20 percent, which could boost the number of meals served by millions.


Meet BIG-i, the 'first personalised household robot'

Daily Mail

The concept of a robot assistant in the home is moving from sci-fi to reality thanks to a new product that claims to be the first personalised household robot. BIG-i is able to interpret voice commands and perform simple household tasks, such as controlling other smart devices and providing reminders. NXROBO, the company behind the robot, believes that in the future every family will have a robot which will act as the'hub for all smart home appliances.' BIG-i is a natural-interaction robot with mobility, 3D vision, voice programming, and active perception. The robot, which stands 2ft 6ins (80 centimetres) tall, is able to move freely around the home as necessary, avoiding obstacles and can be controlled via a smartphone app as well as voice commands. It also has facial recognition technology that allows it to recognise family and friends in order to carry out specific tasks, such as reminding the children to remember their school lunchbox before they leave the house.


Tuesday's TV highlights: 'Cosplay Melee' on Syfy

Los Angeles Times

The Flash Continuing a crossover storyline that started on "Supergirl," Barry (Grant Gustin) and his team are taken aback when Mon-El and Hank Henshaw (guest stars Chris Wood and David Harewood, respectively) appear on their Earth with Supergirl (Melissa Benoist), who is comatose after the Music Meister's (guest star Darren Criss) attack in this new episode. New Girl Jess (Zooey Deschanel) uses her time taking care of her dad (guest star Rob Reiner) as an excuse to avoid thinking about her feelings for Nick (Jake Johnson), while Nick panics about his relationship with Reagan (Megan Fox). Bones Each of the principal characters gets a chance to shine as this long-running mystery series reaches its next-to-last episode. Brennan (Emily Deschanel) is in court, testifying on behalf of Dr. Zach Addy (guest star Eric Millegan), while Aubrey and Jessica (John Boyd, Laura Spencer) reach a decision about their future.


How to use Swarm AI instead of polls for market research - TechRepublic

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In May 2016, TechRepublic challenged a startup called Unanimous A.I. to predict what some thought would be impossible: The superfecta at the Kentucky Derby. Hardly anyone, including Louis Rosenberg, CEO of Unanimous A.I., thought this would actually work--but he accepted the challenge, creating an artificial "swarm" through an AI-based platform called UNU that picked the top four horses, in order, at the 2016 Derby. The swarm consisted of a group of 20 people with some knowledge of horse racing, chosen anonymously, who participated on the UNU platform. The model, based loosely on the concept of nature's swarms--How do honeybees decide where to migrate to?--incorporated a kind of group intelligence, a collective decision. The swarm correctly predicted the superfecta, beating 540-1 odds.


What would a computer cook for dinner? - BBC News

AITopics Original Links

Anybody who has been to British chef Heston Blumenthal's world-famous Fat Duck restaurant in the UK village of Bray will know that strange flavours do work together. There egg and bacon ice cream, snail porridge and tobacco-infused chocolate were born. Blumenthal has acquired something of a mad scientist reputation - half chef, half molecular physicist - but even he might raise an eyebrow at the possibility that a computer could create such daring and flavoursome recipes. But that is exactly what IBM is setting out to do as its increasingly intrepid supercomputer Watson takes on that most human of activities - cooking. Watson's flavourbots will be churning out recipes at the annual interactive, film and music festival SXSW, offering visitors to its base in Austin, Texas some hopefully algorithmically delicious dishes, served via a food van.