K–12


Google's AI is no smarter than a first grader, study says

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Google's AlphaGo may have unseated Ke Jie as the Go world champion but it's no smarter than a kindergartner. A study published Saturday showed Google's artificial intelligence technology scored best out of 50 systems that Chinese researchers tested against an AI scale they created, although it's still no smarter than a six year old, CNBC reported Monday. At 47.28, it's almost twice as smart as Apple's virtual assistant, Siri. AI systems have developed so quickly that it's been able to act as an assistant, take an exam and even outperform us at strategy games.


Episode 2: A Conversation with Oren Etzioni

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Our first project is the Aristo project, and that's about building a computer program that's able to answer science questions of the sort that we would ask a fourth grader, and now we're also working with eighth-grade science. It turns out, paradoxically, that things that are relatively easy for people are really quite hard for machines, and things that are hard for people--like playing Go at world championship level--those are actually relatively easy for the machine. Certainly our goal is to give it the background knowledge and understanding ability to be able to answer those types of questions, which combine both basic knowledge, basic reasoning, and enough understanding of language to know that, when you say "a nickel," you're not referring to the metal, but you're referring to a particular coin, with a particular size, and so on. And it's really a much harder AI problem to answer fourth-grade science questions than it is to solve Go.


Google's AI is no smarter than a first grader, study says

#artificialintelligence

Google's AlphaGo may have unseated Ke Jie as the Go world champion this year, but the artificial intelligence behind AlphaGo is actually no smarter than a 6-year-old child. A study published Saturday showed Google's artificial intelligence technology scored best out of 50 systems that Chinese researchers tested against an AI scale they created, CNBC reported Monday. With a IQ score of 47.28, Google's AI was almost twice as smart as Apple virtual assistant Siri, which scored 23.94. The systems included Google's AI, Siri and Chinese search engine Baidu.


How Artificial Intelligence Will Change School Forever

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No, she's not wielding a crystal ball; instead, she has AI-powered software to study your child's learning habits and social interactions through a combination of cognitive modeling and machine learning. "Essentially, we're talking about the same sorts of systems that beat the best poker players in the world … being repurposed to understand high school students," says Ming, explaining how they will help today's pupils build better futures. From AI systems that warn when and where a student will struggle to intelligent personalized tutors, here's a glimpse of education's future. What AI can do in a high school context is … finally focus on the core of any high school experience -- coming to understand your emotions and your relationship to your world; coming to understand metacognition, your own thought processes; and being able to self-assess and structure your plans.


Robot from Boston Dynamics totally eats it during demo

Mashable

A robot fail usually sends shockwaves throughout the internet, but a Boston Dynamics demo that went awry last month is just now getting a reaction. At the annual Congress of Future Science and Technology Leaders at UMass Lowell, Boston Dynamics presented its humanoid robot, Atlas, performing cool tricks on stage. Somehow Boston Dynamics was spared the immediate online ridicule that comes with this type of thing--especially impressive considering it was in front of a huge group of high school students with their phones out. The robotics company was sold from Google to the Japanese company Softbank earlier this year, just before the robot fall.


More random searches, a savings consultant and Dallas' worst elementary school: What's new in education

Los Angeles Times

More random searches, a savings consultant and Dallas' worst elementary school: What's new in education L.A. Unified is pushing principals to meet district requirements for using random searches and metal detector scans to find students' weapons. L.A. Unified is pushing principals to meet district requirements for using random searches and metal detector scans to find students' weapons. A new report found that California's rural school districts don't have access to enough teacher professional development resources to ensure a smooth implementation of the Common Core. A new report found that California's rural school districts don't have access to enough teacher professional development resources to ensure a smooth implementation of the Common Core.


AI2 lists top artificial intelligence systems in its Visual Understanding Challenge

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Some of the world's top researchers in AI have proved their mettle by taking top honors in three challenges posed by the Seattle-based Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. Charades Activity Challenge: Computer vision algorithms looked at videos of people performing everyday activities – for example, drinking coffee, putting on shoes while sitting in a chair, or snuggling with a blanked on a couch while watching something on a laptop. THOR Challenge: The teams' computer vision systems had to navigate through 30 nearly photorealistic virtual scenes of living rooms and kitchens to find a specified target object, such as a fork or an apple, based solely on visual input. Textbook Question Answering Challenge: Computer algorithms were given a data set of textual and graphic information from a middle-school science curriculum, and then were asked to answer more than 26,000 questions about the content.


Love of anime prompts young Filipinos to pursue Japanese studies in select high schools

The Japan Times

The Filipino Department of Education started offering the Japanese language and culture program to high school students in 2009, together with Spanish and French, to prepare young Filipinos for both local and international opportunities that would require communicative competence in a second foreign language, after English. When the education department decided to introduce the Japanese program, it partnered with Japan Foundation Manila to train Filipino teachers, a task that proved challenging. Franza and Chee of Makati Science High School won third place, representing their school as a pair, during a Japanese quiz bee earlier this year. Agreeing that the program helps foster better relations between the Philippines and Japan, Education Secretary Briones said, "Young people connect to young people, everywhere.


Girl Power in the World of AI

@machinelearnbot

As co-founder of SAILORS (Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's Outreach Summer), America's first AI summer camp for teen girls, Olga reflects on what she refers to as a "transformative experience." According to a report by The American Association of University Women (AAUW), the number of women in the computing field plunged from 1990 when it was 35 percent to just 26 percent in 2013. "Fei-Fei has a clear mission," Olga asserts, "to change the world –and the world of AI – through research and her work on diversity. Six other alumnae have won the she #include Fellowship, which supports high school students to develop computer science outreach initiatives in the communities.


Dean Kamen: "The magic is out there!"

MIT News

Two superstars in the world of engineering -- Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway transporter and the stair-climbing wheelchair iBot, and Woodie Flowers, MIT professor emeritus and former host of PBS' "Scientific American Frontiers" -- in back-to-back talks to students at MIT last week touted the fun, satisfaction, and potential for global impact that careers in engineering can provide. The talks, called Inspiring Engineering, preceded the annual head-to-head robotic competition that is the culmination of the mechanical engineering class 2.007 (Design and Manufacturing I). Both speakers described the history and remarkable growth and popularity of the robotic competition for high-school students called FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), which Kamen and Flowers co-founded in 1992. These research institutions, Kamen said, in many cases have already developed such regenerative technologies in laboratory-scale tests, including work that could lead to 3-D "printing" of entire organs for transplantation, but they have not been able to cross the chasm that separates promising research from actual commercial production.