Fine Arts


'Superhero' 3D printed hands help kids dream in Argentina

Daily Mail

Hundreds of Argentine kids like Kaori who were born without limbs are now able to write, play sports and make music thanks to low-cost prosthetic hands devised by Gino Tubaro, a 21-year-old inventor whose work was praised by President Barack Obama during a visit to Argentina last year. In this June 12, 2017 photo, Kaori Misue attends art class in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In this May 30, 2017 photo, Gino Tubaro, right, fits a prosthetic arm on Juan Pablo Pelaez in Buenos Aires, Argentina. In this May 30, 2017 photo, Juan Pablo Pelaez stands in Gino Tubaro's workshop, as he waits for a 3D printer to finish a piece for his prosthetic arm, in Buenos Aires, Argentina.


When Robots Come for Our Jobs, Will We Be Ready to Outsmart Them?

#artificialintelligence

They looked at 702 types of jobs in the United States and made judgments about whether there was a low, medium, or high risk that technology would displace workers in those jobs over the next 10 to 20 years. Their startling conclusions: 47 percent of total U.S. employees have a high risk of being displaced by technology, and 19 percent have a medium risk. That means that 66 percent of the U.S. workforce has a medium to high risk of job destruction. Frey and Osborne predict that the low-risk jobs are in science, engineering, the arts, education, health care, law, and business management.