Computer Literacy & Computer Science


How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy

#artificialintelligence

People who create this type of technology must be able to build teams, work in teams, and integrate solutions created by other teams. The number of students taking Advanced Placement exams in computer science is growing dramatically, but the 58,000 students taking the AP Computer Science A (APCS-A) test last year still pales in comparison to the 308,000 who took the AP Calculus AB test. Few U.S. high schools now go beyond the core training necessary to prepare for the APCS-A exam, though we have a few stunning success stories -- Stuyvesant High School in New York City, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia, and TAG (The School for the Talented and Gifted) in Dallas, among others. As with science and math, we need governmental standards driving K-12 computer science education, along with textbooks, courses and ultimately a highly trained national cadre of computer science teachers that are tied to those standards.


How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy

#artificialintelligence

People who create this type of technology must be able to build teams, work in teams, and integrate solutions created by other teams. The number of students taking Advanced Placement exams in computer science is growing dramatically, but the 58,000 students taking the AP Computer Science A (APCS-A) test last year still pales in comparison to the 308,000 who took the AP Calculus AB test. Few U.S. high schools now go beyond the core training necessary to prepare for the APCS-A exam, though we have a few stunning success stories -- Stuyvesant High School in New York City, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia, and TAG (The School for the Talented and Gifted) in Dallas, among others. As with science and math, we need governmental standards driving K-12 computer science education, along with textbooks, courses and ultimately a highly trained national cadre of computer science teachers that are tied to those standards.


10 Free Must-Read Books for Machine Learning and Data Science

@machinelearnbot

The typical text on Bayesian inference involves two to three chapters on probability theory, then enters what Bayesian inference is. The many topics include neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and boosting--the first comprehensive treatment of this topic in any book. The textbook is laid out as a series of small steps that build on each other until, by the time you complete the book, you have laid the foundation for understanding data mining techniques. The book is based on Stanford Computer Science course CS246: Mining Massive Datasets (and CS345A: Data Mining).


Computational Thinking for Teacher Education

Communications of the ACM

Enthusiasm has grown in recent years for computer science education in many countries, including Australia, the U.S, and the U.K.14,15 For example, in 2012, the Royal Society in the U.K. said, "Every child should have the opportunity to learn concepts and principles from computing, including computer science and information technology, from the beginning of primary education onward, and by age 14 should be able to choose to study toward a recognized qualification in these areas."26 And in 2016, the College Board in the U.S. launched a new computer science curriculum for high schools called "Computer Science Principles"6 focusing on exposing students to computational thinking and practices to help them understand how computing influences the world. Within the computer science education community, computational thinking is a familiar term, but among K-12 teachers, administrators, and teacher educators there is confusion about what it entails. Computational thinking is often mistakenly equated with using computer technology.11,29 In order to address this misrepresentation, the scope of this article includes a definition of computational thinking and the core constructs that would make it relevant for key stakeholders from K-12 education and teacher-training programs.


Why Democracy Needs Computer Science Education » CCC Blog

AITopics Original Links

The following is a special contribution to this blog from Henry Kautz, Chair of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Rochester. His research interests are in knowledge representation, satisfiability testing, pervasive computing, and assistive technology. He is currently President of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). If you have comments on this essay, e-mail Henry or add an entry to the bottom of this blog post. Countless gallons of ink (real and virtual) have been spilled on the need to infuse the humanities into science and engineering education.


CSAIL shows off demos to 150 high-schoolers for "Hour of Code"

AITopics Original Links

On Friday, MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) hosted 150 local high school students for its second annual "Hour of Code" event, tied to the international initiative focused on getting kids interested in programming. Researchers showed off robots, 3-D-printing technology, and other projects to math and computer science students from schools throughout the greater Boston area, including Cambridge, Charlestown, Roxbury, and Somerville. The event also included a surprise video message from John Green, author of the bestselling young-adult novels-turned-movies "The Fault In Our Stars" and "Papertowns." Green commended the students on participating the event and elaborated on why coding is important. "I cannot emphasize enough how much I believe in learning computer science, not least because I am basically a first-grader when it comes to computer literacy," Green said.


Mining of Massive Datasets

#artificialintelligence

The book is based on Stanford Computer Science course CS246: Mining Massive Datasets (and CS345A: Data Mining). CS246: Mining Massive Datasets is graduate level course that discusses data mining and machine learning algorithms for analyzing very large amounts of data. Students work on data mining and machine learning algorithms for analyzing very large amounts of data. If you are not a Stanford student, you can still take CS246 as well as CS224W or earn a Stanford Mining Massive Datasets graduate certificate by completing a sequence of four Stanford Computer Science courses.


Root Is a Little Robot on a Mission to Teach Kids to Code

WIRED

Dubrovsky leads a bio-inspired robotics team at Harvard's Wyss Institute, and knows a lot about spark. He's pretty sure he's figured out a way of creating that spark, too: Root, an educational robot designed to teach kids--and adults--how to code. Zivthan Dubrovsky, Harvard Wyss Institute But the really neat part is the stacking of commands. Shay Pokress, a computer science curriculum developer and lead writer on the National Framework for K-12 Computer Science, got an early preview of Root and was impressed by its functionality.


Is the End of Computer Literacy in Sight? - Smarter With Gartner

#artificialintelligence

In the future, smart agents will remove the burden on organizations to train up tech-literate people by enabling people literate-tech. They will converse with these smart advisors, or virtual personal assistants, in their natural language via touch, speech, keyboards, written text, gestures and other mechanisms. Mr. Austin added that we are witnessing evidence of smart agents driving this transformation and not just with conversation aids like Siri and Cortana. IPSoft's Amelia offers virtual customer assistants that learn from observing person-to-person interactions, and IBM's Watson offers a broad suite of natural-language processing and generation capabilities.


This Girls' Summer Camp Could Help Change the World of AI

#artificialintelligence

It's presentation day at SAILORS, the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's Outreach Summer program, the country's first AI summer camp for girls. Before they become women, the camp gives teenage girls the gift of computer literacy--particularly, literacy in artificial intelligence, one of the fastest-growing branches of computer science. SAILORS was the brainchild of Olga Russakovsky, a recently graduated PhD student who spent eight years at the Stanford AI lab. The enthusiasm continues during the panel, as the campers ask how Google AI engineers spend their work days (one product manager's answer: lots of meetings) and explore the pros and cons of working in industry versus academia.