Computer Literacy & Computer Science


How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy

#artificialintelligence

People who create this type of technology must be able to build teams, work in teams, and integrate solutions created by other teams. The number of students taking Advanced Placement exams in computer science is growing dramatically, but the 58,000 students taking the AP Computer Science A (APCS-A) test last year still pales in comparison to the 308,000 who took the AP Calculus AB test. Few U.S. high schools now go beyond the core training necessary to prepare for the APCS-A exam, though we have a few stunning success stories -- Stuyvesant High School in New York City, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia, and TAG (The School for the Talented and Gifted) in Dallas, among others. As with science and math, we need governmental standards driving K-12 computer science education, along with textbooks, courses and ultimately a highly trained national cadre of computer science teachers that are tied to those standards.


How to Prepare the Next Generation for Jobs in the AI Economy

#artificialintelligence

People who create this type of technology must be able to build teams, work in teams, and integrate solutions created by other teams. The number of students taking Advanced Placement exams in computer science is growing dramatically, but the 58,000 students taking the AP Computer Science A (APCS-A) test last year still pales in comparison to the 308,000 who took the AP Calculus AB test. Few U.S. high schools now go beyond the core training necessary to prepare for the APCS-A exam, though we have a few stunning success stories -- Stuyvesant High School in New York City, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Virginia, and TAG (The School for the Talented and Gifted) in Dallas, among others. As with science and math, we need governmental standards driving K-12 computer science education, along with textbooks, courses and ultimately a highly trained national cadre of computer science teachers that are tied to those standards.


Root Is a Little Robot on a Mission to Teach Kids to Code

WIRED

Dubrovsky leads a bio-inspired robotics team at Harvard's Wyss Institute, and knows a lot about spark. He's pretty sure he's figured out a way of creating that spark, too: Root, an educational robot designed to teach kids--and adults--how to code. Zivthan Dubrovsky, Harvard Wyss Institute But the really neat part is the stacking of commands. Shay Pokress, a computer science curriculum developer and lead writer on the National Framework for K-12 Computer Science, got an early preview of Root and was impressed by its functionality.


Is the End of Computer Literacy in Sight? - Smarter With Gartner

#artificialintelligence

In the future, smart agents will remove the burden on organizations to train up tech-literate people by enabling people literate-tech. They will converse with these smart advisors, or virtual personal assistants, in their natural language via touch, speech, keyboards, written text, gestures and other mechanisms. Mr. Austin added that we are witnessing evidence of smart agents driving this transformation and not just with conversation aids like Siri and Cortana. IPSoft's Amelia offers virtual customer assistants that learn from observing person-to-person interactions, and IBM's Watson offers a broad suite of natural-language processing and generation capabilities.


This Girls' Summer Camp Could Help Change the World of AI

#artificialintelligence

It's presentation day at SAILORS, the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's Outreach Summer program, the country's first AI summer camp for girls. Before they become women, the camp gives teenage girls the gift of computer literacy--particularly, literacy in artificial intelligence, one of the fastest-growing branches of computer science. SAILORS was the brainchild of Olga Russakovsky, a recently graduated PhD student who spent eight years at the Stanford AI lab. The enthusiasm continues during the panel, as the campers ask how Google AI engineers spend their work days (one product manager's answer: lots of meetings) and explore the pros and cons of working in industry versus academia.