Security & Alarm Services


The 4 Largest Small Business IT Trends to Watch for in 2018

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Small and medium-sized businesses are getting their 2018 plans under way, putting ideas in motion to attract new customers, grow revenue and profits, and ride the waves of change in their industries. They are also likely considering the IT investments they will need to make to do all of that. How will SMBs approach technology in 2018, and how will the changing IT landscape affect business decisions? Radical changes are unlikely next year, as trends that suffused 2017 will evolve, according to small business IT analysts. Next year, artificial intelligence applications will become a larger part of small business' cloud usage, according to surveys and analysts, as SMBs take advantage of AI advancements from Microsoft, Google, IBM and others.


Netvue Releases World's First Artificial Intelligence Doorbell

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It offers a leading-edge approach to respond to visitors and surroundings of the house. Belle will be available on Kickstarter on Jan. 16, 2018, starting at $129, as well as on exhibit at #42925, Sands Hall at CES 2018. Powered by an HD live camera and two-way audio, Belle functions as a 24/7 on-shift liaison between the house owners and their visitors. Through Netvue's mobile app, the real-time view in front of the home entrance is available with a network connection and communicates with guests on a constant basis even when the house owner is away from home. With the infrared night vision, video monitoring in the dark is no longer a blurry sight.


Maximus Camera Floodlight review: Brand X is trying harder

PCWorld

Ring is the brand most people think of when it comes to floodlight cams, but Maximus (and its corporate ally Kuna, which provides the underlying technology) is trying harder to get noticed. The Maximus Camera Floodlight, first announced way back at last year's CES is finally available--and it's a compelling value. The biggest difference is in the floodlight itself. Both companies build their floodlights with LEDs, but where the Ring's are inside somewhat conventional cans, the Maximus' lights are flat rectangular panels. The large motion passive-infrared sensor that hangs down and in between the two panels like a round proboscis imbues the Maximus with an insect-like appearance.


Column

AI Magazine

"British astronomers have just begun to operate RoboNet-1.0, It's a dream come true for the astronomers at Liverpool John Moores University who pioneered the development of a fully automated intelligent robotic network. They developed the network to allow astronomers to follow up unpredictable events or appearances of objects in the sky as rapidly as possible, something that isn't ordinarily possible with a single telescope at a fixed position.... ESTAR, a joint project of Liverpool John Moores University and Exeter University, developed intelligent autonomous software programs, known as agents, that will function as the brains of the network. Acting as'virtual astronomers,' the agents will collect and analyze data 24 hours a day, alerting their flesh-andblood counterparts only when they catch sight of something noteworthy." "A highly advanced system of video surveillance that Chicago officials plan to install by 2006 will make people here some of the most closely observed in the world.


Survey Says: Software Systems Spur Security Slowdown, but AI Can Help

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Security staff are spending too much time on tasks that can be better handled by software. As noted by ZDNet, IT decision-makers estimate that employees waste three hours per day dealing with issues from application feature gaps, and security admins see that waste reach 10 hours per week, according to a study commissioned by LogRhythm. Teams can't work as quickly as they'd like. In a landscape driven by emerging threat vectors and insider threats, speed underpins great security response. How can software systems keep pace with security expectations?


Researchers use Twitter, AI to develop flood warning system

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Researchers are combining Twitter, citizen science and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to develop an early-warning system for flood-prone communities in urban areas. In a study, published in the journal Computers & Geosciences, the researchers showed how AI can be used to extract data from Twitter and crowdsourced information from mobile phone apps to build up hyper-resolution monitoring of urban flooding. "By combining social media, citizen science and artificial intelligence in urban flooding research, we hope to generate accurate predictions and provide warnings days in advance," said Roger Wang from University of Dundee in Britain. Urban flooding is difficult to monitor due to complexities in data collection and processing. This prevents detailed risk analysis, flooding control and the validation of numerical models.


Researchers use Twitter, AI to develop flood warning system

#artificialintelligence

Researchers are combining Twitter, citizen science and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to develop an early-warning system for flood-prone communities in urban areas. In a study, published in the journal Computers & Geosciences, the researchers showed how AI can be used to extract data from Twitter and crowdsourced information from mobile phone apps to build up hyper-resolution monitoring of urban flooding. "By combining social media, citizen science and artificial intelligence in urban flooding research, we hope to generate accurate predictions and provide warnings days in advance," said Roger Wang from University of Dundee in Britain. Urban flooding is difficult to monitor due to complexities in data collection and processing. Artificial Intelligence: Here's all it can do with Machine Learning and Deep Learning This prevents detailed risk analysis, flooding control and the validation of numerical models.


Beware! AI-Enabled Smart Eyes Will Catch You If You Break The Law!

#artificialintelligence

AI-enabled cameras will soon scan you on the streets, and will detect and identify you if you break any law on the road. A Brazilian security company, Polsec, is bringing security cameras based on artificial intelligence (AI) technology to the streets of Delhi, Mumbai and Agra, starting next month. The company will keep on adding more cameras as necessary and new features will be installed on all cameras as they are available. Smart Eyes is AI-enabled security cameras system which can detect any unusual movements, breaking of traffic rules, unauthorised parking of any vehicle in violation areas in addition to many more features. These cameras are designed to make it easier for the authorities to catch the law-breakers within a short span of time.


Las Vegas Casinos Are Now Testing Covert Gun-Sensing Technology

WIRED

Activate satellite view in Google Maps and head to the Las Vegas strip, and you'll see it: a strange smattering of Y-shaped buildings. Their blueprints put gambling at the center of everything, funneling visitors past slot machines and card tables whether they're en route to a show, their room, a restaurant, or a retail shop. For years, the casino floor was where Vegas resorts made most of their money, and the Y was devilishly good at monetizing it. The Westgate Las Vegas Resort and Casino was the first megacasino to feature the design--a bit of trivia that Mark Waltrip, Westgate Resort's chief operating officer, relays with a mixture of pride and irony. Y-shaped buildings have their issues, after all.


Snoopers beware: Google's AI can now spot shoulder-surfers peeking at your screen

ZDNet

Researchers show off Google's fast shoulder-surfing detector on a Pixel. Google researchers have developed a privacy application that can instantly detect when a stranger glances at your screen over your shoulder. Researchers See Jung Ryu and Florian Schroff will demonstrate their shoulder-surfing warning system at next month's Neural Information Processing Systems Conference in California. The pair haven't released a paper that explains technology, but a video demonstration suggests they've installed a lightweight machine-learning model on a Pixel smartphone that uses its front-facing camera for rapid gaze detection. When the user holds a phone up to chat or view a private video, say, on a train or other crowded place, the algorithm will detect when someone else from behind begins looking at the screen too.