Trading


No, Artificial Intelligence and 'The Blockchain' Don't Go Together - Bitcoinist.com

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If one types in "define blockchain" into Google, this is the definition they receive: A system in which a record of transactions made in bitcoin or another cryptocurrency are maintained across several computers that are linked in a peer-to-peer network. Likewise, if one searches for "define artificial intelligence," they receive the following answer: The theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks normally requiring human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. As noted by Kailash Nadh at LiveMint, these two technological advancements aren't related -- and shouldn't be shoehorned together. Examine almost any whitepaper for an initial coin offering (ICO) from 2017 or 2018 and there's a good chance you will find that the project plans on miraculously marrying the blockchain to artificial intelligence in order to not only provide business solutions but also solve all of the world's problems. Throw in some stock images of astronauts and robots, and you've got the complete package.


3 Top Artificial Intelligence Stocks to Watch in March -- The Motley Fool

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The artificial intelligence market is often cited as the next frontier for many tech companies, since AI algorithms can quickly crunch large amounts of data to automate decisions. However, AI is frequently tossed around as a buzzword, which makes it tough for investors to identify the top investments in the market. Today, a trio of our Motley Fool contributors will highlight three companies that have established firm footholds in the nascent AI market: Baidu (NASDAQ:BIDU), NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA), and AMD (NASDAQ:AMD). Leo Sun (Baidu): Chinese tech giant Baidu, which owns the country's largest search engine, is also one of the world's biggest players in artificial intelligence. Like its overseas counterpart Alphabet's Google, Baidu accumulated large amounts of data through its search engine, mapping platform, mobile app, and cloud services.


The Quantum Revolution Is Coming, Ready Or Not

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The Redmond, Washington-based tech giant is competing with Alphabet Inc.'s Google, International Business Machines Corp. and a clutch of small, specialized companies to develop quantum computers – machines that, in theory, will be many times more powerful than existing computers by bending the laws of physics. Two recent articles caught my eye. The first was in Financemagnates.com It was an interview with Michael Bancroft of Bloomberg TV, in which he spoke of the spreading popularity of blockchain technology, not just for protecting cryptocurrencies but for a growing number of uses including cybersecurity. He said that before too long, "what we're likely to see is blockchain being employed for cybersecurity… [in] governments who are looking to secure important files and records safe from hackers."


Machine Learning meets Blockchain - Sefik Ilkin Serengil

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Solutions come after problems but exceptionally blockchain is a solution looking for its problems. We cannot find a completely solution except bitcoin based on blockchain. There are all around proof of concept studies just aiming to use blockchain. They wouldn't solve real world problems. Herein, meeting of blockchain and machine learning might become a remarkable revolution.


Apple Co-Founder Wozniak on Zuckerberg, AI, Crypto

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Apple Inc. Co-Founder Steve Wozniak discusses how he lost respect for Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg after his congressional testimony. He also comments on the future of AI, tech startups, cryptocurrencies, and Apple's next innovation.


#Blockchain Artificial Intelligence and Cryptocurrency: Separating Hype from Reality

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Pick an industry – any industry – and you can virtually guarantee that AI will have been hailed as its next big thing. The cryptocurrency sector is no different, with many of 2017's ICOs shoehorning the concept into their whitepapers somewhere in a bid to appear "cutting edge" and in touch with the zeitgeist. But beyond all the hype, what impact will artificial intelligence have on the crypto industry, and could its rise ultimately render human traders obsolete? AI is to tech what "blockchain" is to the cryptocurrency industry: a concept whose genuine applications are significantly outnumbered by the projects interested solely in latching onto the buzzword and surfing it for all it's worth. Given that startups described as being involved with AI attract 15-50% more funding than other tech firms, it's understandable why companies are so keen to cash in on the hype.


Dubai is world's top city for foreign investments in artificial intelligence, robotics

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According to the law published in the Official Gazette, a foreign direct investment unit is to be established in the Ministry of Economy. This will be "responsible for proposing foreign direct investment policies in the country and determining its priorities, and setting up associated plans and programmes, and work on their implementation following their approval by the UAE cabinet."


If you're worried that quantum computers will crack your crypto, don't be – at least, not for a decade or so. Here's why

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Special report Quantum computing has been portrayed as a threat to current encryption schemes, but the ability of finicky vaporware to overthrow the current security regime looks like it's massively overstated. Richard Evers, cryptographer for a Canadian security biz called Kryptera, argues that media coverage and corporate pronouncements about quantum computing have left people with the impression that current encryption algorithms will soon become obsolete. As an example, Evers points to remarks made by Arvind Krishna, director of IBM research, at The Churchill Club in San Francisco last May, that those interested in protecting data for at least ten years "should probably seriously consider whether they should start moving to alternate encryption techniques now." In a post Evers penned recently with his business partner Alastair Sweeny, he contends, "The hard truth is that widespread beliefs about security and encryption may prove to be based on fantasy rather than fact." And the reason for this, he suggests, is the desire for funding and fame.


How Artificial General Intelligence might be created

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The goal of creating thinking machines is not a new one. It has been theorized and fantasized about for almost as long as humans have been capable of attributing intelligence to the non-living. From Frankenstein's monster to Alan Turing's famous "Imitation Game," we have dreamed about various entities that can think and reason as we can. Let's break down what we mean by "Artificial General Intelligence," and separate it from the more commonplace terms of "artificial intelligence" and "machine learning." For our purposes, we imagine an Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) as a machine (or network of machines) that is capable of understanding, rationalizing and acting.


9 Artificial Intelligence Startups in Lebanon - Nanalyze

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With roughly the same population as the State of Missouri, Lebanon is a small country of six million people that borders Syria and Israel. Due to its location, the country has been subjected to a multitude of political and religious factions inhabiting the state. People frequently fight over whose invisible friend is better, and the country has faced long periods of instability including wars with Israel, civil wars and internal conflicts, and most recently some spillover from the Syrian war – which means lots of Syrians flying around on motorcycles. All of this turmoil has contributed to structural problems in the economy such as chronic fiscal deficits that have increased Lebanon's debt-to-GDP ratio to the third highest in the world. Economic growth has slowed to 1-2% over the past decade which constrains government investments in necessary infrastructure improvements.