Aerospace & Defense


Boeing promises hypersonic passenger planes in a DECADE

Daily Mail

'I think in the next decade or two you're going to see them become a reality,' Boeing Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg told CNBC at the Paris Air Show. 'I think in the next decade or two you're going to see them become a reality,' Boeing Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg told CNBC at the Paris Air Show. The Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) low-boom flight demonstrator aims to produce a much lower'boom' than other supersonic aircraft, and NASA is hoping to see the first flight tests take place in 2021, according to Aviation Week. NASA is backing plans to return to supersonic flight, with its Quiet Supersonic Transport (QueSST) low-boom flight demonstrator aims to produce a much lower'boom' than other supersonic aircraft, and NASA is hoping to see the first flight tests take place in 2021 The XS-1 program envisions a fully reusable unmanned vehicle, roughly the size of a business jet, which would take off vertically like a rocket and fly to hypersonic speeds.


Predictive maintenance for the Oxford Data Science for IoT Course

@machinelearnbot

After my first post on Anomaly Detection for Time Series post, I would like to continue presenting what I did during the course at for the Data Science for IoT Course at Department of Continued Education of the University of Oxford with Ajit Jaokar. For instance, we can run a clustering algorithm on the dataset to be able to separate data showing failure modes from those which do not show a failure mode. The criticality of the problem can expressed in terms of cost for the organization running predictive maintenance. For instance in the aerospace industry, False Negative for engine failure are more costly than False Positive (in this case this amounts to the cost of servicing the engine plus the cost of opportunity of not using it).


Time to embrace AI BAE Systems

#artificialintelligence

Properly employed, it has the power to help us move our civilisation forward in so many positive and ethically sound ways. All of these reasons are behind why I represented BAE Systems Applied Intelligence recently at the first meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Artificial Intelligence at the House of Commons. ', which is timely in putting AI more firmly on the agenda by looking closely at what it can help us to achieve. We all need to recognise and acknowledge that there is no hiding from AI, as I stated at the parliamentary group hearing, AI is coming and will fundamentally change what and how we do things, like it or not.


Would You Fly on an AI-Backed Plane Without a Pilot?

#artificialintelligence

The aerospace giant is currently studying ways to make already-existing autopilot technology safe enough to fly an aircraft by itself, Reuters reports. The most important ingredient for making autopilots safer, according to Boeing Vice President Mike Sinnett, is artificial intelligence. Sinnett tells Reuters that Boeing will "fly on an airplane next year some artificial intelligence that makes decisions that pilots would make." Even if the technology works, the flying public and government regulators still have to accept it, a dilemma that parallels a key challenge for companies working on self-driving cars.


Boeing to test pilotless planes next year

Daily Mail

The idea may seem far-fetched but with self-flying drones available for less than $1,000 (£774), 'the basic building blocks of the technology clearly are available,' said Mike Sinnett, Boeing's vice president of product development. Mike Sinnett, Boeing's vice president, a pilot himself, plans to test the technology in a cockpit simulator this summer. Airlines are among those backing the idea, in part to deal with a projected need for 1.5 million pilots over the next 20 years as global demand for air travel continues to grow. Airlines are among those backing the idea, in part to deal with a projected need for 1.5 million pilots over the next 20 years as global demand for air travel continues to grow.


Boeing studies pilotless planes as it ponders next jetliner

FOX News

Boeing is looking ahead to a brave new world where jetliners fly without pilots and aims to test some of the technology next year, the world's biggest plane maker said in a briefing ahead of the Paris Airshow. Jetliners can already take off, cruise and land using their onboard flight computers and the number of pilots on a standard passenger plane has dropped to two from three over the years. Self-flying aircraft would need to meet the safety standards of air travel, which had its safest year in 2016, according to the Aviation Safety Network. After in-depth talks with nearly 60 customers it concluded that current wide-body planes have too much range for most of the routes narrow-body planes fly, Boeing Commercial Airplanes Chief Executive Kevin McAllister said in a separate briefing.


Artificial Intelligence: Does it have a Place in GIS? – Geo.Appsmith

#artificialintelligence

What you should know about deep machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). Why companies are investing heavily in developing algorithms capable of processing large data-sets. DigitalGlobe is also heavily using AI deep machine learning to process and classify large volumes of satellite imagery. And according to Orbital Insight deep learning is the key to developing Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machines that perceive and understand the world.


Dutch start-up launches next generation mapping drone

Robohub

Drone company Atmos UAV has launched Marlyn, a lightweight drone which flies automatically, effortlessly and at high wind speeds. One of the first customers that signed up is Skeye, Europe's leading unmanned aircraft data provider. "With her unique properties, Marlyn allows us to tackle even our most challenging jobs," says Pieter Franken, co-founder of Skeye, one of Europe's leading unmanned aircraft data providers. About Atmos UAV Atmos UAV is a high-tech start-up that designs and manufactures reliable aerial observation and data gathering solutions for professional users.


China's new powerful military drone image released

Daily Mail

In addition, the alleged drone would be able to avoid radar detection as it could fly at an extremely low altitude above the waters, according to Chinese news website Sina. It's said to be a member of the CH drone series and can fly at a low altitude above the sea The picture, thought to be of China's new military drone, was first posted by a Chinese internet user on Weibo on May 3. According to the report, the alleged drone could carry up to one tonne of aerial torpedoes, and could strike and defend at altitudes as low as one metre (3.2 feet) above the sea. The military channel of Chinese news website Sina said the aircraft is an anti-ship drone that could carry out'lethal strikes' on warships with aerial torpedoes It is also said to be the latest member of China's military drone series, known as Rainbow or CH.


Mining the moon could give us rocket fuel to get to Mars

Daily Mail

A second rover, the Constructor, would follow along behind, building a launch pad and packing down roadways to ease movements for the third rover type, the Miners, which actually collect the ice and deliver it to nearby storage tanks and an electrolysis processing plant that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen. The Constructor would also build a landing pad where the small near-moon transport spacecraft we call Lunar Resupply Shuttles would arrive to collect fuel for delivery as newly launched spacecraft pass by the moon. The fuele depot (artist impression) would have large solar arrays powering an electrolysis module for melting the ice and then turning the water into fuel, and large fuel tanks to store what's made Our plans also require a few small robotic shuttles to meet up with nearby deep-space mission vehicles in lunar orbit.