New Finding


Smart system could cut test times for self driving cars

Daily Mail

The process, which was developed using data from more than 25 million miles of real-world driving, can cut the time required to evaluate robotic vehicles' handling of potentially dangerous situations by 300 to 100,000 times, saving 99.9 percent of testing time and costs, the researchers say. Yet for consumers to accept driverless vehicles, the researchers say tests will need to prove with 80 percent confidence that they're 90 percent safer than human drivers. Michigan Transportation Director Kirk Steudle says the laws put Michigan ahead of most other states with the possible exception of Florida in specifically allowing tests without a human driver. Steudle says the laws put Michigan ahead of most other states with the possible exception of Florida in specifically allowing tests without a human driver.


Researchers find a more effective way to test self-driving cars

Engadget

It's tricky to test self-driving cars. If you want to gauge the car's reaction to someone cutting you off, for instance, you just focus on that -- you use stat analysis to determine how the car would behave in "boring" moments. You could match Waymo's yearly driving experience (635,000 miles in 2016) in the space of a day. The researchers are aware that they need to account for many, many more situations before this testing method is ready for practical use.


Learning to read rewires the brain in just six months

Daily Mail

Pictured is an artist's impression of the brain Researchers studying Indian women learning to read for the first time in their 30s found looking at books can prompt the brain to reorganise itself. Instead, researchers found that reorganisation took place deep inside the brain, particularly in the brainstem. Instead, researchers found that reorganisation took place deep inside the brain, particularly in the brainstem and thalamus, a walnut-sized structure that relays sensory and motor information. 'We observed that the so-called colliculi superiores, a part of the brainstem, and the pulvinar, located in the thalamus, adapt the timing of their activity patterns to those of the visual cortex,' said co-researcher Michael Skeide, scientific researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig.


Paris school using AI to monitor if pupils are distracted

Daily Mail

Starting in September, two online classes from the ESG business school will be using a facial recognition program called Nestor to measure students' engagement, and it will even give them warnings when they start to slack off. Nestor, a software from LCA Learning, tracks eye movements and facial expressions using the computer's webcam Nestor, a software from LCA Learning, tracks eye movements and facial expressions. Nestor, a software from LCA Learning, tracks eye movements and facial expressions using the computer's webcam, and analyzes these features to assess the student's engagement, valence, and attention. Starting in September, two online classes from the ESG business school will be using a facial recognition program called Nestor to measure students' engagement.


AI provides breakthrough in treatment for motor neuron disease

#artificialintelligence

The Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) and AI start-up BenevolentAI have announced a potentially major breakthrough in the treatment of motor neuron disease, thanks to artificial intelligence. The groundbreaking development for the disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), came about as scientists from SITraN assessed the efficacy of a drug candidate proposed by BenevolentAI's AI technology. The scientists, led by Dr. Richard Mead and Dr. Laura Ferraiuolo, found there are significant and reproducible indications that the drug prevents the death of motor neurones in patient cell models, and delayed the onset of the disease in the gold standard model of ALS. Ken Mulvany, founder and chairman at BenevolentAI, added: "We understand from SITraN their research demonstrates that the hypothesis and drug candidate that our technology identified has delayed the onset of cell death in the gold standard model of ALS.


AI Deconstructs Phone Sales Pitches Sales

#artificialintelligence

Men tended to speak at a faster pace, averaging about 2.88 words per second compared to the average 2.79 seconds for women, the study found. Men also paused longer -- averaging about 1.5 seconds compared to women's 1.3 seconds. To carry out the research, Gong used artificial intelligence and machine learning technology that was developed to recognize sales conversation patterns. "The danger is that there can be an over reliance on machine learning to create the right formula for a sales call, which is really as much an art as it is science," Local Search Association's Sterling added.


Bad bots do good: Random artificial intelligence helps people coordinate

#artificialintelligence

To figure out whether random AI can help people coordinate, Hirokazu Shirado, a sociologist and systems engineer, and Nicholas Christakis, a sociologist and physician, both at Yale University, asked volunteers to play a simple online game. In some networks, every 1.5 seconds the bots picked whatever color differed from the greatest number of neighbors--generally a good strategy among people playing the game. The noise level of bots influenced the noise level in people--even those several nodes away, suggesting a ripple effect. If you see a neighbor (bot or human) change color frequently, you might decide to do so, too.


AI for Good Global Summit

#artificialintelligence

A number of distinguished speakers and organizations have committed to participating in the Summit, including: Rupert Stadler CEO and Chairman of the Board of Management of AUDI AG Margaret Chan Director-General of World Health Organization (WHO) Peter Norvig Director of Research at Google Professor at University of Padova, and Research Scientist at IBM Watson Corporate Vice President of Microsoft AI and Research Head of Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA), and Canada Research Chair in Statistical Learning Algorithms Fei-Fei Li Director of Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab (SAIL), and Chieft Scientist of AI at Google Cloud Professor in Computer Science and Robotics at Carnegie Mellon University, and Former President of AAAI Vicki Hanson President of ACM, and Distinguished Professor of Computing at the Rochester Institute of Technology Salil Shetty Secretary General of Amnesty International Pedro Domingos Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at University of Washington Gary Marcus Professor of Psychology and Neural Science at James Martin Research Fellow, Future of Humanity Institute, at University of Oxford Director of United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) Jü rgen Schmidhuber Scientific Director, Swiss AI Lab, IDSIA; Professor of AI, USI & SUPSI, Switzerland; President of NNAISENSE Eric Horvitz (Remote) Technical Fellow and Managing Director of Microsoft Research Founder and CEO of Hanson Robotics Stuart Russell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC-Berkeley, and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery at UC-San Francisco Click here for full list The event will convene representatives of government, industry, UN agencies, civil society and the AI research community to explore the latest developments in AI and their implications for regulation, ethics and security and privacy. Breakout sessions will invite participants to collaborate and propose strategies for the development of AI applications and systems to promote sustainable living, reduce poverty and deliver citizen-centric public services. The event will convene representatives of government, industry, UN agencies, civil society and the AI research community to explore the latest developments in AI and their implications for regulation, ethics and security and privacy. Breakout sessions will invite participants to collaborate and propose strategies for the development of AI applications and systems to promote sustainable living, reduce poverty and deliver citizen-centric public services.


Learning to read as an adult might change the way your brain works

Popular Science

But new research suggests that learning to read does more than make life easier: it literally changes how the brain works by increasing connectivity between its regions. "We're trying to understand the basic principle of how the brain works," says Falk Huettig, a researcher in the department of psychology of language at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics. To understand how reading affects the brain, Huettig and a team of researchers took two groups of illiterate Hindi-speaking Indian adults in their thirties and matched them for gender, handedness (right handed vs left), income, number of literate family members, and intelligence. Afterwards, one group undertook six months of literacy instruction in the Devanagari script, a writing system used for several languages including Hindi.


Social Network In Monkey Brains Is Clue To Evolution Of Human Mind

International Business Times

Monkey brains have sections dedicated solely to social interactions, a new finding that researchers say could help us better understand the human mind. Scientists scanning the brains of rhesus macaques found that certain parts were active when the monkeys watched videos of social interactions between other monkeys, but that same network was largely inactive in response to other images. With this new research about the social network in rhesus monkey brains, scientists may have found a brain structure of which humans have a more evolved version -- what the study called "an evolutionary forerunner of human mind-reading capabilities." Rhesus monkeys have an entire brain network that is dedicated to social interactions.