New Finding


Computer Learns To Play Go At Superhuman Levels 'Without Human Knowledge'

NPR

According to the researchers, there are 10 to the power of 170 possible board configurations in Go -- more than the number of atoms in the known universe. According to the researchers, there are 10 to the power of 170 possible board configurations in Go -- more than the number of atoms in the known universe. A year after a computer beat a human world champion in the ancient strategy game of Go, researchers say they have constructed an even stronger version of the program -- one that can teach itself without the benefit of human knowledge. The program, known as AlphaGo Zero, became a Go master in just three days by playing 4.9 million games against itself in quick succession. "In a short space of time, AlphaGo Zero has understood all of the Go knowledge that has been accumulated by humans over thousands of years of playing," lead researcher David Silver of Google's DeepMind lab said in remarks on YouTube.


Computer Learns To Play Go At Superhuman Levels 'Without Human Knowledge'

#artificialintelligence

According to the researchers, there are 10 to the power of 170 possible board configurations in Go -- more than the number of atoms in the known universe. A year after a computer beat a human world champion in the ancient strategy game of Go, researchers say they have now constructed an even stronger version of the program -- one that can teach itself without the benefit of human knowledge. The program, known as AlphaGo Zero, became a Go master in just three days by playing 4.9 million games against itself in quick succession. "In a short space of time, AlphaGo Zero has understood all of the Go knowledge that has been accumulated by humans over thousands of years of playing," lead researcher David Silver of Google's DeepMind lab said in remarks on YouTube. "Sometimes it's actually chosen to go beyond that and discovered something that the humans hadn't even discovered in this time period."


How chatbots can help reduce customer service costs by 30%

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Key Points: – Businesses spend $1.3 trillion on 265 billion customer service calls each year – Chatbots can help businesses save on customer service costs by speeding up response times, freeing up agents for more challenging work, and answering up to 80% of routine questions – Learn how you can increase productivity and performance at your call centers by seamlessly integrating chatbots and live agents It's 3 AM on a Monday. Maria, a product design engineer, is preparing her presentation of a new ergonomic adjustable standing desk. The weekend flew by, and now it's crunch time to finalize the presentation. Maria opens the product design application, and starts the login process and the application requests an activation code. Maria frantically looks for the code in her email and cloud storage, but to no avail.


French scientists find anomaly in retinal cells that may be the cause of dyslexia

The Japan Times

PARIS – A duo of French scientists said Wednesday they may have found a physiological, and seemingly treatable, cause for dyslexia hidden in tiny light-receptor cells in the human eye. In people with the reading disability, the cells were arranged in matching patterns in both eyes, which may be to blame for confusing the brain by producing "mirror" images, the co-authors wrote in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. In non-dyslexic people, the cells are arranged asymmetrically, allowing signals from the one eye to be overridden by the other to create a single image in the brain. "Our observations lead us to believe that we indeed found a potential cause of dyslexia," study co-author Guy Ropars of the University of Rennes, told AFP. It offers a "relatively simple" method of diagnosis, he added, by simply looking into a subject's eyes. Furthermore, "the discovery of a delay (of about 10 thousandths of a second) between the primary image and the mirror image in the opposing hemispheres of the brain, allowed us to develop a method to erase the mirror image that is so confusing for dyslexic people" -- using an LED lamp.


Could this explain why boys more likely to have autism?

Daily Mail

It is a question that has long stumped researchers. But now light has been shed on why boys are more at risk of autism. University of Iowa scientists believe they have collected the first ever evidence of a'protective effect' in females. Trials on mice showed males who had a known genetic cause of autism showed signs of being on the spectrum. This genetic deletion, or a missing stretch of DNA, plays a role in one in every 200 cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), experts claim.


The human brain has tripled in size as we ventured further

Daily Mail

While previous studies have suggested that our brains evolved to become larger as our social group size got larger, a new study is calling this into question. The research indicates that instead, our brains enlarged because of ecological factors, such as expanding home range of diet. Researchers hope their findings will shed new light on the evolution of our species. While previous studies have suggest that our brains evolved to become larger as our social group size got larger, a new study is calling this into question. The researchers pooled two large sets of data on primate brain size.


Marijuana May Cause Damage To Brain, Research Suggests

International Business Times

Marijuana is said to cause permanent damage to the brain and can make users dependent on it, a new study suggested. A team of neuroscientists wanted to determine what makes marijuana addictive through long-term exposure to the drug, according to research published Monday in the journal JNeurosci. Scientific research has previously confirmed that frequent marijuana use can lead to addiction, but this study provides further detail into why this outcome is possible. Researchers at Brigham Young University's (BYU) neuroscience department injected teenage male mice test subjects with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -- marijuana's active ingredient -- for a weeks time. BYU researchers examined the mice's brain's ventral tegmental area (VTA), a cluster of neurons positioned near the midline in the midbrain.


How we determine who's to blame

MIT News

How do people assign a cause to events they witness? Some philosophers have suggested that people determine responsibility for a particular outcome by imagining what would have happened if a suspected cause had not intervened. This kind of reasoning, known as counterfactual simulation, is believed to occur in many situations. For example, soccer referees deciding whether a player should be credited with an "own goal" -- a goal accidentally scored for the opposing team -- must try to determine what would have happened had the player not touched the ball. This process can be conscious, as in the soccer example, or unconscious, so that we are not even aware we are doing it.


Automation could wipe out third of jobs by 2030's

Daily Mail

The rise of robots could lead to'unprecedented' change and wipe out over a third of jobs in some areas by the 2030's a new report warns. A'heat map' of Britain shows the areas most at risk of automation, with workers in the ex industrial heartlands of the North and Midlands most likely to lose their jobs. The upheaval tossed up by'supercharged' technological change over the next 15 years could make the industrial revolution pale in comparison, the study says. The report, The impact of AI in UK constituencies, by think-tank Future Advocacy, slams the government for failing to prepare for the rapid change looming. Researchers said the results are'startling' and told ministers to urgently look at new education and training to help the country adapt to the challenge.


How dating apps like Tinder are changing societies

Daily Mail

While online dating used to be somewhat taboo, millions of people around the world are now using apps and websites to find love. And a new study indicates that online dating is even impacting the nature of society. Researchers suggest that this new way of looking for love is connecting communities in novel ways, and even leads to more interracial and stable marriage. A new study indicates that online dating is even impacting the nature of society. In their study, the researchers simulated what happened when extra links are introduced into a social network made up of men and women from different races.