Experimental Study


New robotic system can diagnose neurodegenerative diseases through eye movements

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A new robotic system developed by UPM researchers and AURA Innovative Robotics Company can help diagnose neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia and Parkinson, through the analysis of eye movements. OSCANN Desk is a non-invasive technology developed by researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) and the company AURA Innotive Robotics, led by Cecilia García Cena that with a simple and fast test can provide data about brain functioning through the measurement of eye movements. This new system is in the phase of clinical trial authorized by the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices in six Spanish hospitals and, thanks to techniques of imaging processing and machine learning, its results will allow doctors to early diagnose neurodegenerative diseases and carry out customized treatments. The diagnosis process of a neurodegenerative disease takes time since symptoms are complex to assess in the early stages of the disease. Besides, there are symptoms that are common to other neurodegenerative diseases such as tremors.


Listening to audiobooks is more engaging than watching films – even if you don't realise it, study finds

The Independent

Audiobooks are more emotionally engaging than TV and film – even if you don't realise it, according to a landmark new study. The new research from UCL suggests that having a book read to you causes physiological changes including an increased heart rate and heat spreading through your body. During the experiment, scientists had 103 participants of various ages listen to a range of different books, and compared their responses to how they felt when they watched the same scene in a film or TV adaptation. The study included emotional scenes from Game of Thrones and the Girl on the Train, for instance, both from the original book and their hugely popular adaptations. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Why Are We Behind In Piecing Together How Neuroscience Relates To Mental Illness?

Forbes Technology

Why are we behind in neuroscience and the association with mental illness? Why are we behind in neuroscience and the association with mental illness? We're behind because mental illness is difficult to measure quantitatively, and the brain as a whole is both amazingly complex and poorly-understood. Like chronic pain, which is another tough-to-treat disorder, many symptoms of mental illness are subjective, and under these circumstances you need a very large number of patients and an enormous amount of rigor to do good clinical studies. The functional or structural correlates (i.e., the actual physical issues) underlying mental illness are only now coming to light with modern brain mapping technology, and often there is not a one-to-one correspondence between a certain structural change in the brain and a given diagnosis.


How Artificial Intelligence Could Help Us Live Longer

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What if we could generate novel molecules to target any disease, overnight, ready for clinical trials? Imagine leveraging machine learning to accomplish with 50 people what the pharmaceutical industry can barely do with an army of 5,000. It's a multibillion-dollar opportunity that can help billions. The worldwide pharmaceutical market, one of the slowest monolithic industries to adapt, surpassed $1.1 trillion in 2016. In 2018, the top 10 pharmaceutical companies alone are projected to generate over $355 billion in revenue.


The AI That Spots a Stopped Heart

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A woman in Copenhagen hears a loud crash in the next room and rushes in to discover her father sprawled on the floor, unresponsive. She quickly calls Denmark's health-emergency hotline, where a person answers the phone--but a computer is eavesdropping. As the operator runs through a series of questions--the patient's age, physical condition, what he was doing when he fell--the computer quickly determines the man's heart has stopped and issues an alert. "This software can help them save lives." Corti's AI employs machine learning to analyze the words a caller uses to describe an incident, the tone of voice, and background noises on the line.


Now, AI can detect heart attacks over a phone call

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A Danish software company has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) programme that can detect heart attacks, according to a report in Bloomberg. The report said that the Corti SA's AI employs machine learning based on neural networks to analyse the words used in a panic call describing the incident, the tone of voice, and background noises. It then issues an alert about the likelihood of a heart attack. The software accurately detected cardiac arrests in 93% of cases versus 73% for human dispatchers, according to a study by the University of Copenhagen, the Danish National Institute of Public Health, and Copenhagen Emergency Medical Services. In addition, the software was able to make a decision in 48 seconds on an average, more than half a minute faster than humans.


Busy Britons are suffering from 'gadget confusion', study claims

The Independent

Busy Britons are suffering from "gadget confusion," a study has found. Research revealed millions are baffled by the number of buttons, symbols and switches on devices which are difficult to use. It also emerged a large percentage claim they don't have the time to read instructions and three quarters confessed to being confused by gadgets. Why the connected home's best place might be the garden New at-home beauty gadgets you need to try The latest smart gadgets keep homes cosy -- and safe -- all year round The best kitchen gadgets for creating healthy meals, fast Why the connected home's best place might be the garden Another eight in 10 admitted using a "trial and error" approach when it comes to their devices and appliances. And more than a third can't be bothered to try different settings or options.


Facebook is building a big new $750 million data center in Alabama

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Facebook has got big plans for a new $750 million data center in Huntsville, Alabama. On Thursday, the social networking giant announced it was building a new 970,000 square foot facility in Huntsville, a city in the northern part of the US state. "As a growing tech hub, Huntsville seemed like a natural fit for Facebook," the company wrote on a new Facebook post dedicated to the planned data center. "It also provides reliable access to renewable energy, strong local infrastructure, a great set of community partners, and very importantly, an outstanding pool of talent." A Facebook spokesperson confirmed to Business Insider that it is investing $750 million in the project.


In Enterprise Software, The End Goal Comes First

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CHICAGO, IL – A typical enterprise's journey towards becoming digital involves investing in several different technologies to drive growth and thrive in this complex era. Thus, you might see multiple tools being deployed in an enterprise trying to solve disparate challenges – ranging from provisioning/de-commissioning cloud, managing networks, process automation, and so forth. On average, every enterprise has tens and sometimes 100s of tools to provide a'point' or a'specific' solution. In fact, one of the top company representatives I recently met at a trade show mentioned that their enterprise with more than 3500 tools. They bought into this with the idea that they'd reach one cohesive outcome – which isn't happening because of the massive effort needed for integration to make them all work together Unfortunately, for them and many other companies, this'siloed' approach proves to be quite costly – a recent study suggested that more than 70% of the digital transformation programs are expected to fail.


Can Aparito's Wearable Tech Solve Big Pharma's Billion-Dollar Crisis?

Forbes Technology

As many as 42% of pediatric clinical trials end up in failure and inconclusive results. "That means we don't know one way or the other if a drug works or not," says Aparito founder Elin Haf Davies. This isn't just a problem for the big pharma companies who are spending billions of dollars developing successful studies. It's a problem for you, the patient, who pays a mark up on medication to cover these costs--and for taxpayers supporting healthcare services like the NHS. "Society as a whole is losing out," notes Davies, a former research nurse for medical institutions like London's Great Ormond Street Hospital.