Research Report


Is Artificial Intelligence Ready To Overhaul Healthcare Sector - CXOtoday.com

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) which is changing the world, is making its presence felt in the healthcare sector. The rapid pace at which the scientific innovations are taking place, the expansion of AI into various healthcare verticals and the fact that the efficiency of systems can be improved using AI are some of the factors that are currently driving the market, believe researchers. The use of artificial intelligence in the medical and healthcare sector has revolutionized the industry with artificial intelligence being used in several practices such as diagnostics, personalized medicine, the development of drugs, and continuous monitoring and care of the patients. Numerous companies have invested in the application of artificial intelligence in healthcare. IBM's Watson is being used for oncology and cancer treatment in the hospitals.


Artificial intelligence could spark 'radical' economic boom, according to new research

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From Amazon's Alexa learning which restaurants its users like, to Apple's iPhone predicting the next word in a text message, artificial intelligence (AI) is already having a significant influence on everyday life. But Northwestern economist Benjamin Jones and his colleagues are now asking what happens to economic growth if artificial intelligence starts generating original thought. They are among the researchers looking at how much more human work AI can automate, including the generation of new ideas. "If machine learning can really take over all human tasks and take over ideas of innovation, then it would be possible to get a radical change in the growth rate" of the economy, Jones told CNBC in an interview. "But the real question is going to be: can AI take over all of the essential tasks?"


How to AI-Wash Your Company in 3 Easy Steps – Jason Kowal – Medium

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The wait is over, Artificial Intelligence is here. If your company isn't doing it, start looking for a new job. Obsolescence, decline, and/or bankruptcy are around the corner. Take for example drinks giant Coca-Cola, which used the mighty power of Artificial Intelligence to come up with a new flavor, Cherry Sprite, based on the mixes we puny humans selected from their make-your-own "Freestyle" machines. Greg Chambers, Coca-Cola's head of digital innovation summed up their AI-powered strategy at a conference recently: It's hard to argue with that.


A statistical fix for the replication crisis in science

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In a trial of a new drug to cure cancer, 44 percent of 50 patients achieved remission after treatment. Without the drug, only 32 percent of previous patients did the same. The new treatment sounds promising, but is it better than the standard? That question is difficult, so statisticians tend to answer a different question. They look at their results and compute something called a p-value.


Our 'selfish brain' wins when competing with muscle power

Daily Mail

Human brains take a lot of energy to run, and keeping our sophisticated grey matter going comes at an evolutionary cost. Researchers found a trade-off occurs when we have to think fast and work hard at the same time - and our'selfish brain' is always prioritised over the rest of our body. Our ability to allocate more glucose to the brain could have helped our species survive and thrive by becoming quick thinkers, researchers found. Researchers found a trade-off occurs when we have to think fast and work hard at the same time - and our'selfish brain' is less affected than our physical capacity (stock image) The rowers performed two separate tasks: one memory, a three minute word recall test; and one physical, a three minute power test on a rowing machine. They then performed both tasks at once, with individual scores compared to those from previous tests.


Researchers analyze Kuroda's facial microexpressions to predict central bank policy moves

The Japan Times

For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central bankers but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft, are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting news conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called yield curve control policy in September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


In Kuroda's face - researchers find ways to predict central bank changes

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TOKYO (Reuters) - For decades, economists have tried to guess central bank policy direction by studying subtle changes in official language -- now, researchers are finding new clues on policy, not in the words of central banker but in their faces. In Japan, two artificial intelligence researchers, one from Nomura Securities and the other from Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), are using software to analyze split-second changes in the facial expressions of Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda at his post-meeting press conferences. Their study found that Kuroda showed fleeting signs of "anger" and "disgust" at news conferences that preceded two recent major policy changes -- the January 2016 introduction of negative interest rates and the adoption of the so-called "yield curve control" policy September last year. The implication is that Kuroda was beginning to sense the constraints of existing policies about six or seven weeks before the central bank's board actually decided to change them, the researchers concluded. The research was presented last weekend to a subcommittee meeting of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI).


Dogs Show 'Sad Puppy Face' More Often When Being Watched

National Geographic News

Dogs change their facial expressions when they know people are looking at them--perhaps in an effort to communicate. For instance, canines in the study would make the classic "sad puppy face"--raising their inner eyebrows to make their eyes look larger and more infant-like--when looking into a human's eyes. The discovery adds to scientists' ever-growing understanding of man's best friend, one of our species's longest companions. Humans and dogs have lived side by side by some 30,000 years, and along the way, evolution seems to have sculpted dogs' behavior. Research has shown that dogs constantly monitor humans, intently watch our gestures, and in comparison to hand-reared wolf puppies, tend to look up at human faces more often.


How AI and robots are eating desperately-needed jobs in India

ZDNet

If I were under the age of 40, a category that encompasses approximately 65 percent of Indians, I would be absolutely terrified right about now. For that matter, if I were below or above those ages, I would also be petrified. If ever a country faced the prospect of a dystopian future marked by gangs of unemployed youth in the millions wandering about creating mayhem, pillaging and plundering for lack of anything else to do, it's India -- unless it is able and willing to do something about it very quickly and efficiently. Sophia got to share her views with some powerful leaders. AI and robotics are part of this story but to understand the gigantic swamp of quicksand that India is in, we have to go back a little.


Google Test Of AI's Killer Instinct Shows We Should Be Very Careful

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If climate change, nuclear weapons or Donald Trump don't kill us first, there's always artificial intelligence just waiting in the wings. It's been a long time worry that when AI gains a certain level of autonomy it will see no use for humans or even perceive them as a threat. A new study by Google's DeepMind lab may or may not ease those fears. There are two unmistakable sides to the debate concerning the future of artificial intelligence. The researchers at DeepMind have been working with two games to test whether neural networks are more likely to understand motivations to compete or cooperate.