Goto

Collaborating Authors

New South Wales


UNSW announces a glove to mimic touch and a grant for VR-based spinal cord injury relief

ZDNet

Engineers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have claimed the invention of a soft wearable device they say simulates the sense of touch. Haptic technology mimics the experience of touch by stimulating localised areas of the skin in ways that are similar to what is felt in the real world through force, vibration, or motion. "When we do things with our hands, such as holding a mobile phone or typing on a keyboard, all of these actions are impossible without haptics," Scientia lecturer and director of the UNSW Medical Robotics Lab Dr Thanh Nho Do said. "The human hand has a high density of tactile receptors and is both an interesting and challenging area to encode information through haptic stimulation, because we use our hands to perceive most objects every day." He said there are many situations where the sense of touch would be useful, but is impossible.


NSW wants to be known as digital capital of the southern hemisphere by 2023

ZDNet

The New South Wales Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello has vowed to make the state the digital capital of the southern hemisphere in the next three years, releasing its inaugural artificial intelligence (AI) strategy to help achieve that goal. "AI stands for absolutely imperative for the new New South Wales. As we get out of this COVID period, we need to make sure we create a new New South Wales, which is technology-focused … AI is absolutely at the heart of this," he said. "When you think about what's happening around us, AI is already here. AI is in the drones as it protects us from sharks. AI is looking after us in the hospitals. AI is helping us on the roads as we try to avoid traffic. AI is already part of lives; we don't see it, but it is already here, and it is going to grow exponentially in the years ahead. "New South Wales is unashamed to be the digital capital of the southern hemisphere in the next three years.


Australia Hopes Artificial Intelligence Can Curb Harassment of Women

#artificialintelligence

SYDNEY, AUSTRALA - Artificial intelligence that automatically detects threatening behavior at train stations is part of a new trial to improve safety for women traveling at night in Australia. The New South Wales state government says nine out of 10 Australian women have experienced harassment on the street. It asked researchers to submit ideas to improve safety as part of its Safety After Dark Innovation Challenge. Four entries have been chosen and will be tested over the next six months. One group from the University of Wollongong will develop artificial intelligence (A.I.) software that will examine real-time feeds from security cameras and alert an operator when it detects suspicious activity or an unsafe environment.


Tech apparently the solution to stop harassment on NSW public transport

ZDNet

Instead of focusing on upping enforcement action against those causing grief to women on public transport at night, Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) will trial "innovative data and technology ideas" to improve safety for women in Greater Sydney. After running a Safety After Dark Innovation Challenge, TfNSW has settled on a handful of ideas that will be trialled over the next six months, including artificial intelligence in CCTV to automate the detection of threatening behaviours, using datasets and algorithms to create routing that prioritises safety, and a new platform for public safety and assistance. "We want all our customers to feel safe on the network and it is not good enough that 9 out of 10 Australian women experience harassment on the street and modify their behaviour in response," Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said. "We're excited to be working with entrepreneurs and universities to implement innovative technology solutions to keep women safe." TfNSW received 44 applications for the Safety After Dark Innovation Challenge and the winners were selected by a panel after a virtual pitch event.


NSW bushfire inquiry calls for use of more advanced drones and remote sensors

ZDNet

The NSW bushfire inquiry final report has underscored a need to equip firefighters with more advanced technology, such as drones, remote sensors, data science, and artificial intelligence (AI), to help them better understand, model, and predict bushfire behaviour, and respond more quickly. "While noting that the 2019-20 fires were unlike anything seen in NSW before, the inquiry also notes that modern day technology and research advances have made us more capable of responding to them than at any time before," the report stated. "But we need to push our technological and our research capabilities much harder so that we can make massive improvements in fire and fire risk interpretation and response." The final report [PDF] is the result of an independent inquiry that examined the causes, preparation, and response to the state's devastating 2019-20 bushfires. A total of 76 recommendations were made and the state government have accepted them all.


NSW government taps into AI and satellite data for bushfire detection and prevention

ZDNet

The New South Wales government has announced it will be investigating how artificial intelligence, combined with data from satellites and local sensor networks, can be used to help speed up bushfire detection and predict fire behaviour. The research will be part of the 2020 Bushfire Data Quest, a week-long online sprint event that will see participation from universities, research institutes, philanthropy, and technology companies. NSW Deputy Premier and Minister responsible for Disaster Recovery John Barilaro said being able to help predict future bushfire activity will help prevent a repeat of Australia's catastrophic bushfire season last summer. "Predicting the behaviour of bushfires is a hugely difficult problem, made more complicated by a myriad of factors such as fuel load, atmospheric conditions, soil moisture, and availability of water," he said. "Using data from satellites is a great advancement on the tools we have traditionally used with much of the task of planning on-the-ground bushfire response relying on the experience and instincts of fire-fighters -- who are often volunteers. "We are investigating further how we use the data from multiple satellites and local sensor networks to create algorithms that will help detect fires earlier, predict fire behaviour, and help emergency services respond more effectively to protect homes, people and nature." The challenge is being carried out in partnership with the Minderoo Foundation wildlife and disaster resilience program, which aims to deliver a plan on how Australia and the rest of the world can prevent, mitigate, and defeat bushfires. The Minderoo Foundation program is currently being overseen by Adrian Turner, former CEO of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's (CSIRO) Data61. He explained earlier this year how as part of developing a fire disaster strategy, new technologies would be piloted to help map where fires are likely to start and when they are most likely to occur, for instance. "We're looking at new satellite technology, we're looking at spatial intelligence infrastructure, we're looking at new classes of drones to be able to help with early detection," he said at the time. "Ultimately, we may get to a place where we have unmanned vehicles dropping new types of fire retardants.


General health orientation based psychological motivations for masters athletes, a consideration of clustering utilizing t-distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding

#artificialintelligence

Dr. Joe Walsh is with Sport Science Institute www.sportscienceinstitute.com Ian Timothy Heazlewood is Associate Professor and Theme Leader Exercise and Sport Science in The School of Psychological and Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Health, Science and the Environment, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. Dr. Mike Climstein (FASMF, FACSM, FAAESS) is with Clinical Exercise Physiology, Southern Cross University, School of Health and Human Sciences, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; Physical Activity, Lifestyle, Ageing and Wellbeing Faculty Research Group, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 2006. An exploration of clustering of general health orientation psychological motivations for participation in sport was conducted using t-distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE). The aim of this research was to assess the suitability of applying t-SNE to creating two-dimensional scatter plots to visualise the relationship between different general health orientation motivators. The data source used for this investigation was survey data gathered on World Masters Games competitors using the Motivations of Marathoners Scales (MOMS). Application of t-SNE plots could assist in visually mapping general health orientation psychological constructs and gaining greater understanding of the underlying patterns in the MOMS tool.


UNSW switches cloud-based data lakes for AI and ML capabilities

ZDNet

It was clear to the University of New South Wales (UNSW) that at the end of 2018, when it was developing its data strategy, it needed to improve the turnaround time it took to get information into the hands of decision makers. But to do that, the university had to set up a cloud-based data warehouse, which it opted to host in Microsoft Azure. The cloud-based warehouse now operates alongside the university's legacy data warehouse, which is currently hosted in Amazon Web Service's (AWS) EC2. "Our legacy data warehouse has been around for 10 to 15 years. But we started looking at what platforms can let us do everything that we do now, but also allows us to move seamlessly into new things like machine learning and AI," UNSW chief data and insights officer and senior lecture at the School of Computer Science and Engineering, Kate Carruthers said, speaking to ZDNet.


Artificial intelligence impact on society

#artificialintelligence

Three friends were having morning tea on a farm in the Northern Rivers region in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, when they noticed a drilling rig setting up in a neighbor's property on the opposite side of the valley. They had never heard of the coal seam gas (CSG) industry, nor had they previously considered activism. That drilling rig, however, was enough to push them into action. The group soon became instrumental in establishing the anti-CSG movement, a movement whose activism resulted in the NSW government suspending gas exploration licenses in the area in 2014.2 By 2015, the government had bought back a petroleum exploration license covering 500,000 hectares across the region.3 Mining companies, like companies in many industries, have been struggling with the difference between having a legal license to operate and a moral4 one. The colloquial version of this is the distinction between what one could do and what one should do--just because something is technically possible and economically feasible doesn't mean that the people it affects will find it morally acceptable. Without the acceptance of the community, firms find themselves dealing with "never-ending demands" from "local troublemakers" hearing that "the company has done nothing for us"--all resulting in costs, financial and nonfinancial,5 that weigh projects down. A company can have the best intentions, investing in (what it thought were) all the right things, and still experience opposition from within the community. It may work to understand local mores and invest in the community's social infrastructure--improving access to health care and education, upgrading roads and electricity services, and fostering economic activity in the region resulting in bustling local businesses and a healthy employment market--to no avail. Without the community's acceptance, without a moral license, the mining companies in NSW found themselves struggling. This moral license is commonly called a social license, a phrase coined in the '90s, and represents the ongoing acceptance and approval of a mining development by a local community. Since then, it has become increasingly recognized within the mining industry that firms must work with local communities to obtain, and then maintain, a social license to operate (SLO).6 The concept of a social license to operate has developed over time and been adopted by a range of industries that affect the physical environment they operate in, such as logging or pulp and paper mills. What has any of this to do with artificial intelligence (AI)?


Lifeguards with drones keep humans and sharks safe

#artificialintelligence

A teenager in New South Wales recently died after a fatal shark bite, adding to four other unprovoked shark-related deaths this year. These tragic events send shockwaves through the community and re-ignite our fear of sharks. They also fuel the debate around the best way to keep people safe in the water while minimising impacts on marine wildlife. This was the aim of a five-year trial of shark-mitigation technology--the Shark Management Strategy – which finished recently. The NSW government created this initiative in response to an unprecedented spike in shark bites in 2015, particularly on the north coast of NSW.