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The Current State Of AI In Customer Service And CX (Customer Experience): An Expert Roundup

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Go Moment is the home of the smart concierge Ivy that is well known in the hospitality industry. Singh is also a product design expert and public speaker, and blogs at RajSinghLA.com. Rathinam is also well known and loved in the Seattle tech community and as a mentor to local startups. I caught up with the two of them, in the course of curating and hosting the Rethink CX webinar series sponsored by Freshworks. Like Paddy, I live in the Seattle, Washington area.)


Underwater forest of hydrothermal vents off the coast of Washington is mapped for the first time

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Deep below the Pacific Northwest is an underwater forest of massive hydrothermal chimneys that stretch for miles across the seafloor. At the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, located 220 miles northwest of Washington State, the seabed is ripping apart and underwater geysers and vents are still forming. Using sonar ships and underwater vehicles, researchers have mapped this area for the first time to reveal 527 chimneys - with some standing nearly 90 feet tall. The spirals are created from a buildup of minerals that flow to the surface in heated liquid -- as hot as 750 degrees Fahrenheit. The hydrothermal chimneys, known as the Endeavour vents, are located in a long, narrow valley that stretches about 8.6 miles long and almost a mile wide.


Washington becomes the first state in the US to LEGALIZE facial recognition for law enforcement

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The state of Washington has made it legal for law enforcement and other state agencies to use facial recognition. The new law makes Washington the first state in the US to legalize facial recognition software for government business. Facial recognition has been used by a number of law enforcement agencies at the city and county level, but it has never been formally legalized at either the state or federal level. Washington has become the first state in the US to officially legalize facial recognition software for law enforcement, which it says will be limited to finding missing persons, identifying the deceased, and'for the purposes of keeping the public safe' According to the law, facial recognition will be limited to a handful of uses, including efforts to'locate or identify missing persons, and identify deceased persons, including missing or murdered indigenous women, subjects of Amber alerts and silver alerts, and other possible crime victims, for the purposes of keeping the public safe.' Agencies that want to use facial recognition technology will have to file a notice of intent with the state government along with an accountability report that details how and why they need the technology, according to a report in InfoSecurity.


Microsoft president calls Washington state's new facial recognition law 'a significant breakthrough'

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Microsoft President Brad Smith took a break from responding to the COVID-19 outbreak Tuesday to praise Washington state's landmark facial recognition regulations. Jay Inslee signed a bill Tuesday that establishes rules specifically governing facial recognition software. Smith called the law an "early and important model" and "a significant breakthrough" in a blog post published Tuesday. Some cities have enacted their own facial recognition rules, but Washington is the first to establish statewide regulations. "This balanced approach ensures that facial recognition can be used as a tool to protect the public, but only in ways that respect fundamental rights and serve the public interest," Smith said.


Speeding up machine learning WSU Insider Washington State University

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A self-driving car has a split second to determine whether the image it sees is a person and whether that person has stepped on or off a curb. A mistake, of course, would have deadly consequences. Such is the increasingly challenging world of artificial intelligence and machine learning with demand for computers and robots that can instantly analyze images, reason and solve problems. One of the biggest challenges in AI is that computers simply can't do the computations fast and accurately enough, especially in regards to understanding fast-changing images. Washington State University researchers have recently developed a computer architecture that achieves similar accuracy as conventional graphical processing units (GPUs) but works more than 50 times faster.


Edison, Morse and Watson? AI poses question of who's an inventor

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON/SEATTLE – Computers using artificial intelligence are discovering medicines, designing better golf clubs and creating video games. Patent offices around the world are grappling with the question of who -- if anyone -- owns innovations developed using AI. The answer may upend what's eligible for protection and who profits as AI transforms entire industries. "There are machines right now that are doing far more on their own than to help an engineer or a scientist or an inventor do their jobs," said Andrei Iancu, director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. "We will get to a point where a court or legislature will say the human being is so disengaged, so many levels removed, that the actual human did not contribute to the inventive concept."


CI/CD for Machine Learning

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Rosenbaum: This is the video of a machine-learning simulation learning to walk and facing obstacles, and it's there only because I like it. Also, it's a kind of metaphor for me trying to build the CI/CD pipeline. I'm going to be talking about CI/CD for machine learning, which is also being called MLOps. The words are hard, we don't have to really define these things, but we do have to define some other things and we're going to talk about definitions a lot actually. I'm going to start by introducing myself. I'm on the left, this picture is from DevOpsDays Chicago, our mascot is a DevOps Yak. You can come check out the conference. I work for Microsoft on the Azure DevOps team. I come from a developer background, and then, I did a lot of things with DevOps CI/CD and such. I'm not a data scientist, I did some classes on machine learning just so I can get context on this, but I'm coming to this primarily from a developer perspective. I also run another conference, this is a shameless plug, it's DeliveryConf, it's the first year it's happening, it's going to be in Seattle, Washington, on January 21 and 22. You should register for it right now because it's going to be awesome. The first thing I want to do is I want to set an agenda.


AI-powered 'Otterbot' chatbot helps students navigate choppy waters of financial aid applications

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A new Washington state initiative will harness artificial intelligence to make sure high school graduates get the chance to boost their own smarts. Otterbot is a free, AI-powered texting service that can help high school seniors apply for financial aid that covers tuition and fees for college and other training. Last year, Washington ranked 48th among U.S. states for the percent of students who completed federal financial aid applications or FAFSA, a standardized form used for awarding state and federal financial grants. Only 46% of students here completed FAFSA applications. And this fall, more seniors will be eligible for more generous state support for high education thanks to an increase in funding for the Washington College Grant (formerly known as the State Need Grant).


MicroVision is looking for a great Staff Test Engineer.

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MicroVision is the creator of PicoP scanning technology, an ultra-miniature laser projection and sensing solution based on the laser beam scanning methodology pioneered by the company. The technology is well suited to support a wide array of applications including interactive projection, 3D LiDAR sensing for applications such as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), robotics and industrial applications, and Augmented and Virtual Reality (AR/VR). MicroVision is an independently recognized leader for its formidable intellectual property portfolio. The company is based in Redmond, Washington. MicroVision is seeking a Staff Test Engineer to join the Test Engineering team.