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Unbound Medicine Integrates Machine Learning Into Digital Platform

#artificialintelligence

Charlottesville, VA, USA, March 31, 2021--Unbound Medicine, a leader in knowledge management solutions for healthcare, today announced a major upgrade to their end-to-end digital publishing platform. To enhance clinical decision support capabilities for professional societies and healthcare institutions, Unbound developed Unbound Intelligence (UBI)‒exclusive artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to help clinicians keep up to date with current research, as well as discover and fill knowledge gaps. Unbound Intelligence quickly analyzes large volumes of data and recommends options for next steps in patient management. While clinicians answer questions or research areas of interest on the Unbound Platform, UBI instantly filters through available resources, including the most up-to-date primary literature, to suggest closely related topics and relevant, recently published journal articles. This allows clinicians to quickly expand their reach and discover evidence-based guidance that may have otherwise gone unnoticed.


Machine Learning Meets Local Art to Reflect a Broader Community

#artificialintelligence

Last month, we had the chance to immerse ourselves among Charlottesville, VA's leading civic organizers, entrepreneurs, tech innovators, and futurist visionaries at the 2018 Tom Tom Founders Festival. As a co-sponsor of the Festival's Applied Machine Learning Summit, our team at Capital One wanted to do more than just talk about machine learning -- we sought to create an interactive experience showcasing a real-live example of the technology in an engaging, participatory way, while also highlighting some of the area's amazing local artists. A central theme of Tom Tom is "learn[ing] to see your world in a new way." We took inspiration from that ethos to create a pop-up art gallery that would further explore the idea of viewing the world from a new perspective, powered by a machine learning technique called style transfer. Enter our Style Transfer Gallery, where festival participants were invited to have their picture taken, which was then superimposed into the style and technique of each featured artist -- Laura Wooten, Theodore Taylor, Shannon Wright, and Brandon Robertson -- and projected among an array of digital screens.


This Ex-NSA Hacker Is Building an AI to Find Hate Symbols on Twitter

#artificialintelligence

In August of this year, a white supremacist plowed through a crowd of protesters gathered in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia. The attack injured around 20 people and killed 32-year-old Heather Heyer. The violent clashes that weekend shocked Americans, among them Emily Crose, who wanted to be there to protest against the white supremacists but couldn't make it. A friend of hers was there, and was attacked and hurt by neo-Nazis.


Dog Days of Summer Are Gone Again

Slate

Michelle Goldberg profiles Daryle Jenkins, who's taken on the complicated task of trying to explain the antifa movement, a loose network of militant left-wing anti-fascist activists who often physically confront their opponents, to outsiders. Aisha Harris headed down to the Dixie Stampede, Dolly Parton's "Medieval Times–style dine-in attraction where seven nights a week and at occasional weekend matinees, the South rises again." Last week, OkCupid proudly boasted that it had banned Christopher Cantwell, the white supremacist who became widely known after the Charlottesville, Virginia, rallies. Christina Cauterucci points out that the dating service has long welcomed racists like Cantwell and that overall banning them won't make dating sites any safer. Isaac Chotiner debates Mark Lilla, liberal scholar and author of The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics, about why Democrats keep losing elections.


Dating Apps OkCupid And Tinder Are Kicking Neo-Nazis Offline

International Business Times

Silicon Valley is taking steps to make sure mobile apps don't accidentally set users up on dates with Nazis. Racism and hate are not welcome on Tinder. Choose love, respect, and inclusion. In the wake of white supremacists rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, companies like OkCupid are weeding out users who participate in hate groups. "If any OkCupid members come across people involved in hate groups, please report it immediately," the company tweeted.


Google's New Site Uses Artificial Intelligence to Track Hate Crimes

#artificialintelligence

Many observers and commentators were shocked by the violence that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. But "incidents of hate are actually all too common" in the U.S., according to the journalism nonprofit ProPublica, which has launched a tool to help Americans better understand that reality. The Documenting Hate News Index, built in partnership with Google's News Lab and the data visualization studio Pitch Interactive, collects news reports on hate incidents and makes them searchable by name, topic, and date.


Google's New Site Uses Artificial Intelligence to Track Hate Crimes

#artificialintelligence

Many observers and commentators were shocked by the violence that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. But "incidents of hate are actually all too common" in the U.S., according to the journalism nonprofit ProPublica, which has launched a tool to help Americans better understand that reality. The Documenting Hate News Index, built in partnership with Google's News Lab and the data visualization studio Pitch Interactive, collects news reports on hate incidents and makes them searchable by name, topic, and date. The site is certainly eye-opening, and grim. More than just a list, the site allows hate-related stories to be browsed by date, and shows fluctuations in overall reports of hate crimes over time.


Google uses machine learning to help journalists track hate

Engadget

Hate crimes have sadly existed long before last weekend's tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia but tracking them has been difficult. To help fix that, the Google News Lab has partnered with ProPublica, the New York Times, BuzzFeed News, the Southern Poverty Law Center and the University of Miami's School of Communications on the Documenting Hate News Index. Machine learning is used to pull locations, names and events from some 3.000 news stories published since this February into an easy-to-navigate feed of articles. "The feed is generated from news articles that cover events suggestive of hate crime, bias or abuse -- such as anti-semitic graffiti or local court reports about incidents," Google writes. "We are monitoring it to look our for errant stories that slip in, i.e. searches for phrases that just include the word'hate' -- it hasn't happened yet, but we will be paying close attention."


Boston Univ. student transfers out because of death threats after rally - White supremacist kicked off dating site OkCupid - MEDIA BUZZ: Trump rips the press as Charlottesville backlash intensifies

FOX News

Nicholas Fuentes, an 18-year-old student who attended the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend, said that he's received death threats for months over his conservative viewpoints -- enough for him to decide it's time to leave Boston University. Fuentes said he made the decision to abandon his Political Science degree a month ago after being constantly threatened over his conservative views. He said no longer felt safe on campus, and will not return for the fall semester. Still, despite the intensity of the backlash he's received, he has absolutely "no regrets" about taking part in the controversial white-nationalist movement. "I went to represent this new strain of conservatives, of people in the right wing who are opposed to mass immigration and multiculturalism," Fuentes told Fox News on Thursday.


White supremacist Chris Cantwell kicked off dating site OkCupid

FOX News

White supremacist Chris Cantwell has been kicked off the dating website OkCupid following his participation in the recent Charlottesville, Va. In a series of tweets, OkCupid (owned by Match.com) said it had kicked Cantwell off the platform after being alerted of his profile. We were alerted that white supremacist Chris Cantwell was on OkCupid. Within 10 minutes we banned him for life. "We were alerted that white supremacist Chris Cantwell was on OkCupid," OkCupid wrote in a tweet.